Simuflite Lear 60

starcheckdriver

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Hey guys/gals,

I went to Simuflite for a 135 SIC qual on the Lear 35. I am now headed there for my ATP and type in the Lear 60. I am quite nervous as this is my first type rating in my career. I have no idea what to expect, what to study, how the checkrides are handled, the check airmen, etc. Any help/guidance/tips on this subject would be greatly appreciated. Lear 35 SIC did not require any checks at Simuflite so I am kinda in the dark on this ATP/Type ride. Thanks!
 

airbus_jas

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Some advice:

Your instructor is on your side. So will the Examiner who will most likely be another highly qualified Simuflite instructor. Relax.

On the checkride everyone makes mistakes. If you dwell on them it will be evident to everyone in the room (Simulator). Examiners want to see you be able to pull yourself up from your bootstraps after making an error. If you are thinking about an error you made three minutes ago you are GAURANTEED to miss something and make another big mistake in the near future. This one could be fatal.

Good luck and PM me if you want more info. I have spent several thousand hours in the sim.

Regards
 

Dangerkitty

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Starcheckdriver,

Remember not to call the Bombardier Facility Simuflite. Even though they are attached they are completely different companies. For some reason the Bombardier folks get kinda peeved if you refer to them as Simuflite.

I had to have it explained to me before I understood it.

Have fun in training.
 

MNR

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The guys over at Bombardier who do the instruction on the 60 are great. The 60 flies alot like the 35 just has a little more power. If you can fly the 35 you can fly the 60. There is a flight training device that is made avaiable too all the students. Make use of that. The biggest difficulty in that transition, especially comeing from the 35s you were flying is in the EFIS and FMS. Programming the FMS to do what you want when you want it in a timely manner can be a challenge for someone who has not done it before. Thats why you have two guys in the sim. Make use of the person not flying. Make use of the FTD. Its got all the FMS/EFIS stuff in there and you can play around with it all day if nobody is in there. If you have more questions feel free too PM me.

...oh and welcome to the Dark Side
 

shelley

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If you are doing your training at Simuflite make sure that you ask to have the same instructor for your training. I just did an initial there on a different type, but I had 10 different instructors. Not very conducive to learning IMHO. They all seemed to know their stuff, but there were a lot of gaps in what was covered.
I have heard from several others that they had the same experience.
 

G100driver

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All good advice from above.

As far as the checkride goes:

1. Know all of your limitations down pat
2. Know all of your memory items down pat
3. Be able to talk the DE through all systems of the airplane while using a scamatic.
5. Know your annaciator panal.
4. Fly the airplane within the limitations as required by the ATP PTS.

Provided you fly the airplane to PTS standards and know the limitations everything else is bonus. While it might be nice to know the fuel pressure annunciator light illumiates when the pressure goes below 4.6 psi, (or whatever it is in a Lear 60) who cares. All that matters is you know what that annuciator is and WHY it alluminates. Do not waste your time trying to learn the non-memory items. This is for recurrent. You will be busy enough with important stuff.

Relax. Get the most out of your training. Remember that you are the customer and demand excellence out of your instructors. If you are not working well with your instructor get another. You are in charge.

Very Important. At night, throw your book aside and drink a beer and watch a movie. 2 weeks is a long time be looking at that book. Once you start working the sim and are done with class, you can go over the book again.

Good Luck. I am sure that you will do just fine. Once you get done you will laugh at how nervous you are now. I was the same way before I went to Simuflight for my 1st type rating.
 

some_dude

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To add one thing to G100driver's excellent advice, if you do give a number (such as 4.6 PSI or whatever), make darn sure it's the CORRECT number!

I've seen lots of people get in trouble because they gave a number or factoid that was really not required, and it was wrong! That is an invitation to the DE to start digging deeper, often with bad results.

G100driver said:
Provided you fly the airplane to PTS standards and know the limitations everything else is bonus. While it might be nice to know the fuel pressure annunciator light illumiates when the pressure goes below 4.6 psi, (or whatever it is in a Lear 60) who cares. All that matters is you know what that annuciator is and WHY it alluminates. Do not waste your time trying to learn the non-memory items. This is for recurrent. You will be busy enough with important stuff.
 

fly4kix

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G100 and some dude are right on the money. Don't talk yourself into a hole. Answer the question and no more, if you don't know be honest and offer to look it up. Know your way around the AFM and checklist.
 

HS125

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All the advice above is right on, have fun in training and relax. But when it comes to the checkride remember this one very important thing, "It's Your Checkride". Don't let the examiner rush you, you control the pace of the checkride. If you want an extra turn in the hold to set up for the appraoch ask for it, you'll get it. If you keep the pace of the ride slowed down, you will be more relaxed and less likely to make mistakes.
 

jasonwb

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G100driver said:
All good advice from above.

Remember that you are the customer and demand excellence out of your instructors. If you are not working well with your instructor get another. You are in charge.

Very Important. At night, throw your book aside and drink a beer and watch a movie. 2 weeks is a long time be looking at that book. Once you start working the sim and are done with class, you can go over the book again.

Good Luck. I am sure that you will do just fine. Once you get done you will laugh at how nervous you are now. I was the same way before I went to Simuflight for my 1st type rating.

G100 has hit the nail on the head.....take your time, you've got 2 weeks and that is plenty of time. i know everyone has their own study habits but if there is one thing i reccomend is make flash cards with all the limitations and mem items and the rest of the stuff will fall into place. Good luck and have fun with it!
 

pilotmiketx

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Bombardier Lear 60 program is great. The instructors aren't a bunch of crusty old 707 Captains. Don't stress too much. Just know the systems and memory items like any other checkride. Make flash cards or use the little pocket Annunicator thing to study. Take a day off after the first week and go to Wilhoits (sp?) and get your drink on.
 

BOZO

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starcheckdriver -

Relax. I was in your very position not too long ago and found myself at Simuflite DFW for the 60. Great group of guys (Jim H. is a hoot.) They aren't out to get you. Do as much dry time in the mockup as possible. I typed in the 60 before the 35 and felt that the 35 was the more difficult one! Their training materials I thought were better than FSI's. But that's another debate I'd rather not start. You'll have fun. Good luck!
 

pilotmiketx

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We need to clear something up: As previously mentioned, Simuflite DFW does not do training for the Lear 60. It is Bombardier that does training for the 60, 40/45, 300, 604, and GX (Montreal). This is true Factory Training, as only they have resources that no other provider has. They only share a building w/ Simuflite and use their sim techs. The courseware, instructors and simulators are all separate. I know it's confusing, but it really is two separate animals. The first time I went, I did International Procedures with Simuflite (Blech!) and then LJ-60 a few doors down.

They have an agreement where Simuflite cannot provide training for any current production Bombardier aircraft, so if you go for 35/C-21, 31A, or 55 you'll be training w/ Simuflite. The difference in quality of training is readily apparant to anyone who has done FSI or Simuflite. Where else can you ask a question of your classroom instructor and if he doesn't have the answer (rare), he'll call the flight test engineers during a break and get the answer.
(I'd like to continue flying Bombardier a/c so I never have to return to FSI.) No I don't work for them, just a big fan.

And Jim H. is on the 300 now.
 

BOZO

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Hey it's hard enough having to wear this big red nose but now I must put on my dunce cap?!!! Stupid BOZO!! :smash: 100% correct...they are in no way part of Simuflite and I humbly stand corrected for being lax in the discussion. Tailwinds!
 

USC328

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Starcheckdriver,

I'm pretty sure I know who you are. How long did you fly the Lear on the freight side? If you got comfortable with that, then I would recommend focusing more time on the FMS and technology that the Lear60 has to offer. My sim partner and I (both starcheck alumni on the Lear35) at SkyWest had the most difficulty working with the technology and "the box." Starcheckers are soo used to green needles and not wanting to fly the flight director, but once you get used to it and know how to program the box, it really is a piece of cake. Forget trying to figure the 3-1, 2-1 or in AirNet's case 1-1 descents. Just follow the banana. (Uh oh, Glowinthedark, I GOT THAT SONG STUCK IN MY HEAD AGAIN) Since I have not done a type yet, I would agree with what others are saying. Know your systems, schematics etc. Be able to talk them through each system. I know that the freight guys on their 35 types also had to know all the numbers for the arcs on oil press, oil temp, etc. Just stay in the books and you will do fine. Be sure to use both of you in the sim. It is a two man airplane. GOOD LUCK!!

USC328
 
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G100driver

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One other thing ... this may seem a bit old fashoned. Show up for your check ride in a PRESSED shirt and a tie. POLISHED shoes are in order as well. If anything you sending the unconcious message that this is important to you and you take yourself and this checkride seriously. Good luck.
 

LR60guy

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BOZO said:
starcheckdriver -

Relax. I was in your very position not too long ago and found myself at Simuflite DFW for the 60. Great group of guys (Jim H. is a hoot.) They aren't out to get you. Do as much dry time in the mockup as possible. I typed in the 60 before the 35 and felt that the 35 was the more difficult one! Their training materials I thought were better than FSI's. But that's another debate I'd rather not start. You'll have fun. Good luck!
Jim H., AKA Hollywood, IS a hoot! Enjoyed having him in the sim.

I was going to offer some advice when I first saw this topic, but others have already done so in very good fashion.
 
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