RVSM Airspace

CE-560 DRVR

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I have a question regarding RVSM airspace. I am aware of the requirements for RVSM and the aircraft that I operate is not equipped for this airspace. My question is in regards to airspace labeled RVSM Transition Area, an example of which is located along the West Coast. Is this airspace considered RVSM Airspace and do the same requirements apply?
 

Timebuilder

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We have the same "transition" idea here on the east coast. Since we are not yet equipped for RVSM, which requires both training and a massive equipment retrofit (at an equally massive cost), we have to either stay below or climb above the RVSM area before we run out of "transition area".

Climbing above the RVSM takes some time with full fuel, as the climb rate bleeds off above FL 360, so we have to bargain with ATC to climb towards a fix that allows us to be at the correct altitude for entry into the space above the RVSM area.
 

cessna_driver2

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I should probably know this but I'll ask anyway.

What is the RVSM airspace? It doesn't ring a bell here in the middle of nowhere.
 

flywithruss

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Reduced Vertical Separation Minima

RVSM stands for Reduced Vertical Separation Minima (or Minimums). Basically, rather than the usual 2000 foot vertical separation required above FL290, RVSM-compliant aircraft can be separated by only 1000 feet as below FL290. As a result, RVSM airspace is restricted to RVSM-compliant aircraft whose equipment has been certified for these operations.

RVSM currently exists in oceanic airspace, and over Europe. It is coming soon to airspace near you, so get ready!

If you ask me, other than the need to spend big $ on upgrading older equipment, it is a good way to work toward our collective goal of putting 10 gallons of $h!t in a 5 gallon pail ... now all we need to do is lay down a bunch more concrete to land them all on!

Tailwinds, y'all ...

R
 

JayDub

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RVSM Transition Airspace.

I have a question regarding RVSM airspace. I am aware of the requirements for RVSM and the aircraft that I operate is not equipped for this airspace. My question is in regards to airspace labeled RVSM Transition Area, an example of which is located along the West Coast. Is this airspace considered RVSM Airspace and do the same requirements apply?
RVSM transition is basically the area that borders RVSM Airspace. What that means for you is, both RVSM approved, and non-approved operators can use that airspace. If two aircraft are heading towards each other that are both certified, they can be at the reduced seperation minimums (1000'). If one or both aren't approved, you have to be seperated by atleast two thousand feet.

It's not a big deal to operate in that type of airspace, once you do it once or twice. The big emphasis is on your FDCs (flight data computers) and autopilot operation. They really are nervous about you sneaking up or down a couple of hundred feet.
 
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