Resume Help

uwochris

Flightinfo's sexiest user
Joined
Dec 21, 2001
Posts
381
Total Time
2500+
Hey guys,

Once I graduate from University and begin to apply for a position as an instructor, would I list experience from non-aviation related fields? For instance, would I include my experience working at Canadian Tire (Retail), Harvey's (fast food), paper route, etc.

It seems logical to not include that stuff; however, it does reveal some information about myself (customer service, night-shift experience). If I choose not to include this stuff, I would have nothing to show for experience, as I have no industry experience.

Maybe it would be best to mention this stuff very briefly in a cover letter, and list my flight time as experience in a resume??

Currently my resume is 2 pages... once I start to apply for jobs as a pilot, I assume 1 is the max.

Anyway, thanks for the tips and comments.
 

jaybird

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 25, 2001
Posts
523
Total Time
3.0+
i'd say flight time and experience while limited is a must. put down your ratings exactly as they appear on your tickets. i guess your other jobs would be good to list as it shows you have some kind of work ethic. only list the important and most recent ones to shorten the resume to one page.

good luck
 

banned username 2

Banned
Banned User
Joined
Nov 25, 2001
Posts
3,254
Don't write your resume as paragraphs....

Keep it simple and to key points.... Definately include all flight time and ratings....

I would break it down as follows:

  1. Name, Address, Phone, Email address:

    Objective:

    Certificates & Ratings:

    Flight Experience: (Total Time, PIC Time, Multi-Time, Cross Country, Night, Instrument)

    Education:

    Work Experience:

    Personal Info:
    [/list=1]

    Remember to keep it to pertinent info only, and make i very readable.... When I used to do hiring, if I got a resume which was written like a book, it never got read.... make your key selling points stand out... use a clear font and keep it neat....

    One page only....

    Good Luck
 

bobbysamd

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
5,710
Total Time
4565
Pilot resumes

Absolutely. One page only. Set it up exactly as above. Keep the information to a minimum and use white space wisely so the document is easy to read. Don't forget to put in highlights of your school and work experience, e.g., employee of the month, high GPA, ROTC leadership, Honor Roll, etc.

It is absolutely vital to follow the standard pilot resume format. Deviations will result in the round file. H.R. doesn't like creativity. Make it easy on them. I'm sure someone knows a site that shows a standard pilot resume format.

H.R. experts emphasize the importance of well-written cover letters and how they can open doors. In reality the people who should read them, such as the boss or Chief Pilot, do not. If they are read at all, they're read by H.R. Therefore, your cover letter should be brief, to the point, and focused on the company. Include a couple of sentences on how your quals meet their needs (e.g., "I believe that my qualifications are a good match for your requirements of 1500 total hours and 500 multiengine. My qualifications include an ATP, 2000 total hours and 800 multiengine hours. Of that time, 400 hours are multiengine turbine PIC in FAR Part 135 operations.") Finally, state that you would appreciate the opportunity to present your qualifications in person. Keep it short.

Good luck with your job search.
 
Last edited:

banned username 2

Banned
Banned User
Joined
Nov 25, 2001
Posts
3,254
Just for reference....

If/when you apply for a Charter or Corporate position... do not send your resume through the usual HR channels... it will most likely not get to the Chief Pilot/Department manager in a timely manner (or even at all in some cases)...

Typically Corporate Flight Departments handle their own initial screening and interviewing... after they find a candidate they like, THEN they run them through the HR interview and the rest of the hiring process....

Send Charter/Corporate resumes directly to the Chief Pilot/Department Manager.... This sometimes takes some investigative work to find out who they are and an address to send it to... but it will greatly increase your chances of getting an interview....

Good Luck...
 

uwochris

Flightinfo's sexiest user
Joined
Dec 21, 2001
Posts
381
Total Time
2500+
Hey guys,

Thanks for all the responses.

I was wondering something... would it be best to indicate that some of my courses at University are aviation-related in the cover letter, or should I state this in the resume? It may seem odd to include this, but in Canada, there is only 1 major University which offers a business/aviation degree, and I figured since employers may not be that familiar, I could state in my cover letter that I've studied numerous courses (i.e. aviation law, airport management, etc).

Also, I'm still in university, and have another 2 years until I graduate. I just want to accumulate some information, and maybe start preparing my resume and stuff like that. I know it may be early, but I figure if I start now, I could get a whole bunch of advice from experienced guys like you, and maybe get an edge over others. I also plan to start looking for a CFI job after my third year... before I'll even have my CFI ratings. Would you say this is a bad idea? ie) would employers be turned off by this?

I just want to do whatever I can to ensure a job for myself upon graduation as an instructor. I figure my old jobs like my paper route, working at fast food, physical labour etc may be related, as I can explain how I learned how to work in a "team oriented environment," how I learned how to deal with unpleasant customers, and how I learned to suck it up even when I didn't like the job. I'm just not sure if work like this should be in a pilot's resume.

Anyway, thanks for all the tips!
 

bobbysamd

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
5,710
Total Time
4565
Education background

It depends on where you're directing your resume. I'd be more likely to include a BRIEF statement in the education section of my resume. Keep the cover letter to the point and include the aspects of your quals that are most relevant to the employer. You want to sell them on your quals, but BRIEFLY. State that you have the degree and say that the coursework has prepared you to do whatever. You could write a sentence that summarizes your work experience, something like, " . . . . My employment in [whichever businesses] has prepared me to work effectively with other people and to please customers."

Your resume and cover letter are intended only to secure the interview. It is not the interview. Once you're there in person and they ask the classic "tell me about yourself" question, you'll be on stage. You can then include your educational background in your spiel, assuming, of course, it is relevant to that job.

The employer will realize that as a recent graduate you haven't held many jobs. I'd put down the ones that show that you are willing to work. Any work you've done that you've used to pay for school or training can be played up. You could add a brief statement about it on your cover letter.

I don't know if I'd start looking for CFI work before I have the rating, unless you are trying to get an instructing job with your college after graduation. You need to pave the way for those jobs while you're a student. Otherwise, unless you're applying for an instructor job at a place that knows you, you're likely to be told to come back after you have your certificate. They won't necessarily be turned off; I think you'll just be wasting your time. I don't know at all if flight instructors are in short supply in Canada, but if it is anything like down here and especially now, there are many more new CFIs then there are jobs.

Finally, be willing to take a non-instructing job at a school or FBO. You'll at least have your foot in the door. If you're not hired as an instructor eventually, you at least have an aviation employer to put on your resume and a legitimate reason to move on.

Once again, good luck with school and your plans.
 

starchkr

New Bus driver
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
1,065
Total Time
enough
I am not exactly the most educated in deriving a great resume and cover letter for a major airline, but i do have at least a cover letter that works very well. Maybe it will help, maybe not.

Also, i found my resume format in a book from Barnes and Noble which showed the best way to make a professional resume for the aviation industry. I am sure you can find a good bookstore anywhere that will have one just like it.

The cover letter is as follows:

Dear... so and so...

Please accept this letter and accompanying resume as evidence of my interest in applying for a flight crew position with your company.

My enclosed resume clearly demonstrates that i have the skills and abilities necessary to succeed in this position:

(list a few attributes such as your ratings or previous job attributes here with bullets and indentions...I used four total. Don't forget to make one of them the fact that you have a sincere desire to contribute to the continued growth and success of their company)

After you have the opportunity to review my resume i would like to meet with you to discuss how i can effectively contribute to the future success of your company. I understand the interview process to enter this position as of this time. Should you have any further questions or needs on my behalf, please feel free to contact me at the number posted above.

Thank you very much for taking the time to review my resume and for your kind consideration. I look forward to speaking with you in the future.

Sincerely,


Your name here


It worked for me, and i know this letter would work in other industries as well. This was just an idea, but personalize it however you like. All of the important info a cover letter needs was in there, especially the request to meet with them personally which is by far one of the most important things you can include. Always invite yourself to meet with them... it shows confidence.

Good luck
 

ksu_aviator

GO CATS
Joined
Dec 1, 2001
Posts
1,327
Total Time
4100
From my personal experience Falcon Capt was right on the money.

Also, don't use e-mail or fax machines for sending resumes to charter or instruction jobs. Call first talk to the chief pilot/instructor, then walk in your resume. If its too far away to drive then mail it in an 9x12 envelope so that you don't have to fold it. Make sure your resume is flawless, on high quality paper. And have your colleges career councelors look over your first few drafts. They'll get you set up with a list of "power" words to use.

Good Luck!
 

bobbysamd

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
5,710
Total Time
4565
Resume "action" words

You may think that jobs you've had are nothing jobs and won't matter to an aviation employer. But if you just write down the things you did in a job you'll be surprised at the experience and skills you gained that would be valuable to an employer. Then, you use the past-tense of verbs following your bullet points.

Let's say you worked at a fast-food restaurant. You prepared food, took orders, served customers, trained new employees, and eventually became an assistant manager. Set it up something like this:

*Developed customer service skills

*Trained new employees (see how this is a transferable skill to flight instructing?)

*Supervised new and experienced employees

*Promoted to Assistant Manager and worked in that capacity X number of months

Of course, you should have something like pesonnel change sheets or an LOR to document your experience.

Words like "prepared," "assembled," "wrote," "calculated," "taught," etc. are great actions words. Once again, sit down and put on paper the work you did every day.

Just a couple more ideas. Good luck with working up your materials.
 
Last edited:

dmspilot00

Independent
Joined
Feb 22, 2002
Posts
712
Total Time
300
Action verbs

Quick comment:

Nowadays, most resumes are scanned onto computers. That makes the use of action verbs pretty much obsolete. The focus has shifted to nouns as I've read.
 
Top