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Pilot experience

Jetjockey

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Pilot experience saves the day.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/Qantas-pilots-saved-crippled-rb-3433747950.html?x=0&.v=4

Nothing beats a qualified, experienced pilot. Pay attention management.

SYDNEY (Reuters) - Pilots of a crippled Qantas Airbus A380 superjumbo struggled with more than a dozen system errors after an engine blew apart on Nov 4 and landed the plane in Singapore with barely any runway to spare, an Australian investigation showed.
In fact, the plane may have been so badly damaged that the five pilots, with a combined 72,000 hours of flying experience, may have saved the day.
"The aircraft would not have arrived safely in Singapore without the focused and effective action of the flight crew," Martin Dolan, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau's Chief Commissioner, said on Friday.
As the Rolls-Royce Trent 900 engine blew apart over Batam Island, Indonesia, minutes after take-off, fragments ripped though parts of the wing, puncturing fuel, hydraulic and electronic systems and leaving the plane with limited flight controls, the ATSB said in a report.
But the magnitude of the damage became clear only when the co-pilot walked through the cabin and a passenger, another pilot, showed him a picture from a camera mounted on the plane's tail and fed into the onboard entertainment system.
The picture showed the Airbus was leaving a trail of fluid behind -- most likely fuel and perhaps hydraulic fluid -- from a puncture through the wing.
As the plane lost fuel quickly, its center of gravity also started to shift, presenting another problem. But the crew could not shift fuel as required as it was not clear how badly the fuel system was damaged, the report said.
There were so many warnings, it took pilots 50 minutes just to complete the required responses before they could prepare the plane for landing.
The number of errors was such that computers calculating landing data could not handle them all. Pilots removed some options, hoping that would still be enough to make an accurate call.
With the plane coming in at 440 tons, about 50 tons heavier than its maximum landing weight, the computer eventually concluded it would stop with just 100 meters of runway to spare at Singapore's Changi Airport, the report said.
But 100 meters was enough for the crew and they opted to land instead of dumping fuel, which would further upset the plane's balance.
The A380 "remained controllable" as its prepared to land, but it lost many of its systems which controlled pitch, speed and braking, so pilots asked the cabin crew to prepare for an emergency evacuation as they risked a runway overrun, it said.
The Airbus stopped with just 150 meters of concrete left, brakes heated to 900 degrees Celsius and four blown tires.
In addition, it was gushing fuel and one of its engines refused to shut down for over two hours, until fire crews drowned it with foam.
Pilots eventually decided against evacuation and kept passengers on the plane for another hour as fire crews secured the A380.
 

JoeMerchant

ASA pilot
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Pilot experience saves the day.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/Qantas-pilots-saved-crippled-rb-3433747950.html?x=0&.v=4

Nothing beats a qualified, experienced pilot. Pay attention management.

SYDNEY (Reuters) - Pilots of a crippled Qantas Airbus A380 superjumbo struggled with more than a dozen system errors after an engine blew apart on Nov 4 and landed the plane in Singapore with barely any runway to spare, an Australian investigation showed.
In fact, the plane may have been so badly damaged that the five pilots, with a combined 72,000 hours of flying experience, may have saved the day.
"The aircraft would not have arrived safely in Singapore without the focused and effective action of the flight crew," Martin Dolan, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau's Chief Commissioner, said on Friday.
As the Rolls-Royce Trent 900 engine blew apart over Batam Island, Indonesia, minutes after take-off, fragments ripped though parts of the wing, puncturing fuel, hydraulic and electronic systems and leaving the plane with limited flight controls, the ATSB said in a report.
But the magnitude of the damage became clear only when the co-pilot walked through the cabin and a passenger, another pilot, showed him a picture from a camera mounted on the plane's tail and fed into the onboard entertainment system.
The picture showed the Airbus was leaving a trail of fluid behind -- most likely fuel and perhaps hydraulic fluid -- from a puncture through the wing.
As the plane lost fuel quickly, its center of gravity also started to shift, presenting another problem. But the crew could not shift fuel as required as it was not clear how badly the fuel system was damaged, the report said.
There were so many warnings, it took pilots 50 minutes just to complete the required responses before they could prepare the plane for landing.
The number of errors was such that computers calculating landing data could not handle them all. Pilots removed some options, hoping that would still be enough to make an accurate call.
With the plane coming in at 440 tons, about 50 tons heavier than its maximum landing weight, the computer eventually concluded it would stop with just 100 meters of runway to spare at Singapore's Changi Airport, the report said.
But 100 meters was enough for the crew and they opted to land instead of dumping fuel, which would further upset the plane's balance.
The A380 "remained controllable" as its prepared to land, but it lost many of its systems which controlled pitch, speed and braking, so pilots asked the cabin crew to prepare for an emergency evacuation as they risked a runway overrun, it said.
The Airbus stopped with just 150 meters of concrete left, brakes heated to 900 degrees Celsius and four blown tires.
In addition, it was gushing fuel and one of its engines refused to shut down for over two hours, until fire crews drowned it with foam.
Pilots eventually decided against evacuation and kept passengers on the plane for another hour as fire crews secured the A380.

Yet all the majors ignore that to "check certain 'boxes'"......Many of us have more experience than many that are now getting hired at the mainlines....But I don't get the impression that is what you meant....
 

StopNTSing

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Kudos to the crew! A much more serious situation than the early reports indicated.

My favorite quote:
In addition, it was gushing fuel and one of its engines refused to shut down for over two hours, until fire crews drowned it with foam.
Gotta love these electric jets. They're so much smarter than us pilots. :rolleyes:
 

Jetjockey

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Yet all the majors ignore that to "check certain 'boxes'"......Many of us have more experience than many that are now getting hired at the mainlines....But I don't get the impression that is what you meant....


Joe, you took it the wrong way. Experience is important at ALL levels, even the regionals.

P.S. You have to apply at the majors to get hired. You seem to be happy making a career where your at. Good for you.
 

JoeMerchant

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Joe, you took it the wrong way. Experience is important at ALL levels, even the regionals.

After listening to your MEC Chairwoman Wendy yapping about the experience level of the regional pilots, I'm spring loaded to that position...

I agree with you about experience...No substitute....
 

retired guy

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Joe, you might consider this: It`s the senior(very experienced) pilots that were flying this machine. It`s called the senority system.
 

JoeMerchant

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Joe, you might consider this: It`s the senior(very experienced) pilots that were flying this machine. It`s called the senority system.

From the news report, the 5 pilots had a combined 72000 hours for an average of 14,400 hours, which is about what I have...What's your point? I agree that experience is important...
 

Jetjockey

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From the news report, the 5 pilots had a combined 72000 hours for an average of 14,400 hours, which is about what I have...What's your point? I agree that experience is important...


Maybe you should have went to majors 8 years ago might be the point. I'm guessing it's something other than experiencing holding you back.
 

JoeMerchant

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Maybe you should have went to majors 8 years ago might be the point. I'm guessing it's something other than experiencing holding you back.

If I had gone to United back then, I would have been out of work from said company for those 8 years...
 

Jetjockey

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OR, if you were hired by CAL, you'd be a 737 Captain.
 

Jetjockey

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Hind sight is 20/20. Just like you may say some day. "I should have gone to majors when I had the chance"
 
Last edited:

JoeMerchant

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Hind sight is 20/20. Just like you may say some day. "I should have gone to majors when I had the chance"

Exactly...There is no "right choice"....just different choices....Some who move on are better off, some aren't...You never know.

I know many that went to FedEx, UPS, and Southwest that are extremely happy they made the move. I know many that Delta that are "happy" with the choice...I also know many that went to United, American, and USAirways plus some that went to PanAm, Eastern, and TWA who wish they had never left...Who knows....
 

Jetjockey

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I'll take my chances at the majors any day of the week. As it has been said, the worst day at the majors is still better than the best day at a regional airline.
 

JoeMerchant

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I'll take my chances at the majors any day of the week. As it has been said, the worst day at the majors is still better than the best day at a regional airline.

Then you must have it great...I know I do and am thankful for how things have turned out so far...Why are you so bitter about your job and your company? Enjoy your fabulous job and leave those poor Skywest pilots alone...
 

Jetjockey

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I love my job, I'd love it even more if we had 70 seaters flown by mainline. That's the goal.
 
Last edited:

JoeMerchant

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I love my job, I'd love it even more if we had 70 seatesr flown by mainline. That's the goal.


And managment knows you love your job...Hell you just told them...They know the majority won't walk away forever to fly RJs....The 70s will stay at Express....

This is the advantage management has. United pilots have taken over a 50% total hit in pay and workrules, and you still love your job...Good luck with your battle with that deck stacked against you....
 

Jetjockey

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Time will tell Joe. I like a challenge. Like getting your first airline job without having to pay for it.
 

Green

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give it a rest guys. It seems management has successfully divided and conquered the US pilot group.

back on topic
Impressive work by the Qantas crew. Many of the systems didn't respond as the "should have" yet the crew went outside the box and brought it down safely. Well done.
 
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