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Passenger Lands King Air after Pilot Dies

LegacyDriver

Moving Target
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Nice of Yahoo! to put a photo of a Sovereign on the cover page for the story.

Kudos to all involved and blessings upon the departed.
 

7KCAB

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My owners INSIST that we stay a single-pilot operation. Hmmm, maybe I could get a copilot if I forward this story to them...

I call it cheap insurance. What if there had not been anyone else on the plane with aviation experience? Bet they would be wishing they forked out the extra cash for a copilot then!
 

hawkerflyer

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My owners INSIST that we stay a single-pilot operation. Hmmm, maybe I could get a copilot if I forward this story to them...
I call it cheap insurance. What if there had not been anyone else on the plane with aviation experience? Bet they would be wishing they forked out the extra cash for a copilot then!
Agreed. If a second pilot is going to make or break a flight department, the owner probably shouldn't be in the aircraft in the first place.
 

fisherpilot

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I got my first break flying a turbine aircraft in a turbo commander. I made about what I would have had I stayed instructing. The CP said that what they saved on single pilot insurance paid for what little I got paid. I was just happy not instructing anymore after doing 800 hrs of primary instructing the previous year. I am a big fan of having someone in the other seat regardless if the plane can be flown single pilot. Two sets of eyes and ears are ALWAYS better than one set.
 

SLUF4

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he did seem kinda like that, he did seem to be crying after he got on the ground, though.
 

Fly91

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I love it.

Dude sounds almost bored (the pilot).

Yea, but the guy did have 20 years flying experience. Granted, in single engine aircraft, but 20 years, I'd sure hope he could get a King Air on the ground with not much trouble.
 

Andy Neill

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Yeah...especially since he averaged over 37 minutes a month over those twenty years.
 

Igor

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I have two questions
1. did the pilot eat the fish.
2 was the passenger/new pilot named stryker?
 

mzaharis

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I have two questions
1. did the pilot eat the fish.
2 was the passenger/new pilot named stryker?

3. Was he still disturbed by what happened over Macho Grande?
4. Did George Zipp think he did the right thing?
 

TFlite

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Apr 2, 2007
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What if...

We are going to play around with this scenario in the simulator tomorrow (full motion King Air 200 simulator). The local Fox news station called and has asked to come out and film a short segment for a news segment showing how difficult or easy this was.

They are going to get a low-time single-engine pilot and put him in the right seat and see how he does. One of our instructors will be PIC for the take-off and initial configuration, and another will be manning the instructor station and acting as ATC.

We'll see whether the pilot/controller can consistently get down safely.

We may even try it with a non-pilot. My guess is that the low-time pilot will be fine (since the weather will be CAVU) and that it will be very difficult for the non-pilot.

I'll post a link to the segment if it ever airs...

Matt
www.FlyRightInc.com
 

ILOVEBEER

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They are going to get a low-time single-engine pilot and put him in the right seat and see how he does.


Matt
[URL="http://www.FlyRightInc.com"]www.FlyRightInc.com[/URL]



Tell the "low time" pilot to bring his family and a friend in the sim with him. Have his friend ride in the left seat for the takeoff. During the initial climb, shoot the friend in the head and then tell the "low time" pilot that if he doesn't land the sim safely that his family will die too.

I think that's a more similar scenario, so let us know how he does.


.
 

Snakum

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I was a low-time SE pilot (400hrs) who'd never flown anything bigger than a Skyhawk when I got my first TO and landing in a King Air. Not a big deal, really.

Kudos to the guy who did it under those circumstances, anyway.
 

LRvsH25B

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They are lucky they didn't get that guy killed. In my opinion, that was an extremely poor example of how to talk an aircraft down, even if it was successful. Max breaking on a 2 mile long runway? Pull the power bank and figure it out on your own within 10 knots?; full flaps at 120 no slower than 110. How about be aware of the pitch and speed change when going to full flaps, etc (once again, the A/P coming into play) How about Low Idle or Feather the Props when on the ground? They should have got the guy on the phone to tell him how to put that thing on autopilot with heading mode with ALT select active, then left him fly 30 mile circles out over the water or something with the heading bug and at 200 Knots, giving that guy on the phone or some other B200 pilot a chance to come into the cab and speak with him directly to talk him down. Give him N1 or FF, or Torque settings. Use the A/P to fly the approach down to the runway and hit the red button on the Yoke to land it.
I'm glad it turned out well, but the workload on that guy could have been a lot less had they done it right. I'm sure he is still stressed out. Great story........
 

LJ45

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They are lucky they didn't get that guy killed. In my opinion, that was an extremely poor example of how to talk an aircraft down, even if it was successful. Max breaking on a 2 mile long runway? Pull the power bank and figure it out on your own within 10 knots?; full flaps at 120 no slower than 110. How about be aware of the pitch and speed change when going to full flaps, etc (once again, the A/P coming into play) How about Low Idle or Feather the Props when on the ground? They should have got the guy on the phone to tell him how to put that thing on autopilot with heading mode with ALT select active, then left him fly 30 mile circles out over the water or something with the heading bug and at 200 Knots, giving that guy on the phone or some other B200 pilot a chance to come into the cab and speak with him directly to talk him down. Give him N1 or FF, or Torque settings. Use the A/P to fly the approach down to the runway and hit the red button on the Yoke to land it.
I'm glad it turned out well, but the workload on that guy could have been a lot less had they done it right. I'm sure he is still stressed out. Great story........

Do you know how many different avoinics configurations they have in all the 200's? They got it down on the ground, that is what counts.
 

LRvsH25B

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Do you know how many different avoinics configurations they have in all the 200's? They got it down on the ground, that is what counts.

No doubt about it, you're right, there's a lot of different setups. Even without the use of the avionics, I think that they could have provided him with a little more basic information as to how the aircraft would react to the configuration changes. For example, set the power to this before you put the flaps to full and that power would ensure you would not get too slow, etc. No matter what avionics it had, there is a torque, N1, or FF setting that would get him within 5-10 knots of what he needed to be at. Like I said, just my opinion. I didnt think there was enough info given to this guy, and I think a little lesser of a pilot would not have had such good luck. Glad it all worked out
 

popgoesbubble

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So what is the story on the pilot that died? how old was he what was the cause of death it seems really Hush Hush usually the media reports everything about pilots like this.
 
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