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PAR Approaches!!!!!

ipilot

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Has anyone of you guys actually flown a PAR approach? If yes, then where in the united states and how was it? Thanks.....


________________________
Check that its three greens.....
 

Brother Francis

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Just ask

Most naval air stations have PAR. It has been my experience that they are eager to provide them (traffic permitting) for controller currency.

Not very practical in today's civil aviation environment, but I would recommend it for the experience.
 

Rvrrat

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PARs

Flown a number of them at YNG in the mid 80's; they're a blast and very easy "no gyro" approaches when one concentrates on not overcontrolling the aircraft. The PAR approach, like the ASR approach is conducted verbally via radio, and also like the ASR approach, left/right guidance is given by "start/stop" turn commands followed up with "slightly left/right of course", "left/right of course" and "well left/right of course"situational information. Just outside the FAF you're handed off the the "final controller" on a discrete frequency and told to make all turns 1/2 standard rate and that replies to commands are not neccesary. Your vertical quidance will also be verbal using the same commands and terminology as the lateral guidance. The best places to find them are at joint use civil/military fields. I'm not sure if YNG still has the PAR or not since it's been some years since I've flown in that part of the country. YNG also had or still has the distinction of being one of the few TRSAs left in the country. The radar room was in the tower building one floor down from the cab. The controllers were sharp and great to work with.

Regards,
 

de727ups

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Huh?
PAR's

Used to have IFR students do them at Grey AAF in Tacoma, WA...the controllers were very happy to see us and get the practice. On the other hand...Navy Whidbey wasn't interested in working us.

PAR's are a lot of fun and good at teaching that an ILS is mainly small heading and vertical speed changes and not chasing the ILS needles.
 

FlyinBrian

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If you are in socal or AZ, Yuma does PAR's, and they are happy tp work with you.
 

John Hewlett

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PARS

If you are in the heartland, you are always welcome to try Fort Campbell Kentucky. Campbell is a AAF. They are happy to issue PARS. The will no longer allow you to fly the aircraft over the threshold.

The Designator at Campbell is KHOP and you can contact Campbell Approach on 118.1 whenever you enter the Altert Area or the Campbell 1 & 2 MOAS. They will give you vectors around Restricted Area R3702 A-B.

They love it when you want to do PARS, because it gives them alot of good practice. PAR defines the word precise. I would say the most accurate of them all is the MLS though. However your not going to see non-miltary aircraft other then the space shuttle using an MLS.

Go practice those PAR's!

J.
 

Anne

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I did one for my IR checkride at Pease (Portsmouth, NH), which was unexpected...a complete surprise. It was wicked cool.
 
3

350DRIVER

YNG still does and they usually are very willing to do these approaches-

Dan is one of the areas "finest"-

C H E E R S

3 5 0
 

tdvalve

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"The PAR approach, like the ASR approach is conducted verbally via radio, and also like the ASR approach, left/right guidance is given by "start/stop" turn commands followed up with "slightly left/right of course", "left/right of course" and "well left/right of course"situational information. "

Haven't flown a PAR in years. But, unless things have changed, they're not flown as a "no gyro" approach.
 

Dude Groovy

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Miller
If memory serves, you can ask for a no gyro PAR and they will give you start turn,stop turn, ect.
 

bigsky

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In theory they sound pretty easy but can be a total nightmare-especially if it is a bad controller. I have been scared two times that I remember and they were both bad wx doing a par in foreign countries.( naval stations in spain, italy,turkey) Usually it is a young controller and they think the faster they talk the better they are doing. I also think we screw them up in a heavey airplane as we are not responding as quick as they are used to. I have had some on the other hand that were pretty good. Honestly I would almost rather do a NDB approach than a par with a bad controller. I have had some into Norfolk NAS where we broke out at 250 feet in what would normally be full scale on a vor or ILS.
 

Lindy

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I used to take my students to Selfridge AFB (north of Detroit, MI) for a PAR before their instrument sign-off. It was a nice break before the checkride and they were able to see a different environment.

However, since we were civilian, we could NOT land at Selfridge, just fly over the rwy.



And, if anyone can tell me who Selfridge was named after, beer is on me!! (I know!!)
 

bigr

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Selfridge was the first person to die in powered flight while flying with orville wright.

I like sierra nevada pale ale!
 

Saabslime

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enough
Cheyenne Wyoming does them as well......or used to. Those controllers up there are usually bored out of their witts and are just begging to do stuff like this. Very nice people.
 

BigFlyr

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Most of these posts might imply that PARs are available for practice approaches into military airports, which they are, but I'd like to add that PARs are in many cases the only approaches available along with ASRs into military airports. If you end up flying for an operation that has a military contract, like ATA or Miami Air, you'll do lots of them in solid IFR. Very cool.
 
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