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Only the Britts could come up with this

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G4G5

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2002
Posts
1,800
Britain Proposes Ban Against Basing Non-UK Aircraft
The UK's Department of Transport (DOT) last week issued its official proposal to prevent foreign-registered aircraft from being based in the UK “by limiting the time (e.g. 90 days) such an aircraft may spend in the UK in any 12 months.” While the DOT said that “no significant safety issues have come to light” in relation to aircraft registered in the U.S., Bermuda and the Cayman Islands, the agency does not know what other registers are involved or the safety risks associated with those registers. The DOT believes that many private and corporate aircraft based in the UK have been placed on foreign registers “to take advantage of what are perceived as less onerous regulatory requirements.” The use of foreign-registered aircraft to “opt out of the UK regulatory system undermines the harmonized European standards.” There are some “significant differences” even between the U.S. and the UK regulations, according to the DOT. Moreover, aviation authorities in countries at some distance from the UK “can face practical difficulties in ensuring that aircraft on their register but based in the UK comply with their requirements.” The proposal would also require pilots of foreign-registered aircraft to obtain a UK license and type ratings for operating under IFR. Comments on the proposal are due October 28.
 
Idiots.

Let 'em do it. Less revenue for them. I hope their entire economic system collapses over it when people pack up their businesses and move them to another country.
 
G4G5 said:
The proposal would also require pilots of foreign-registered aircraft to obtain a UK license and type ratings for operating under IFR.

"Gulfstream N1234, radar identified, cleared direct DOLIP flight planned route."

"N1234 cancel IFR"

"say again?!?"
 
Such a proposal does not surprise me in the least. It is rather typical of the supercilious CAA/JAA mentality that to enhance the safety of aviation, you have to regulate it to death.

Despite the onerous regulations and red tape that Western European pilots have to jump through just to obtain and maintain their licences, the level of competence, knowledge and safety of these pilots is probably about the same as their inferior (according to most European aviation authorities) American counterparts!
 
They're just p'd off because there are no DENTISTS in the UK. We should trade them......less stringent regulations for oral hygiene literature and a dental plan.
 
The proposal would also require pilots of foreign-registered aircraft to obtain a UK license and type ratings for operating under IFR.

I just read through the proposal - and can find no reference to the foreign aircraft part. Am I just missing it?
 
Dinger said:
They're just p'd off because there are no DENTISTS in the UK. We should trade them......less stringent regulations for oral hygiene literature and a dental plan.


Oh they got dentists allright. But as a Brit myself, I have to concede that mine wasn't that great when I was growing up... but that was 40 some odd years ago! I suspect things might have improved a little nowadays.

My standard comment on sitting down in the dentist chair here in the US is, 'be warned Doc, I've got British teeth"!

As for the CAA, JAA, DOT regs....I think DogsBollocks hit the nail on the head: "Despite the onerous regulations and red tape that Western European pilots have to jump through just to obtain and maintain their licences, the level of competence, knowledge and safety of these pilots is probably about the same as their inferior (according to most European aviation authorities) American counterparts!"
 

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