Need some tips and suggestions

mocaman

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Hey guys, I have my commercial, instrument, multi with about 300 hours. I was wondering if you could steer me in the right direction in regards to having a career in corporate aviation. I know my measly 300 hours is basically nothing, but I am working on my CfI now, and plan to do that for a while and build time. I would like to learn how some of you guys progressed up to where you are today.

Thanks
 

bigD

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First, do a search on the corporate board, and you'll find a lot of threads just like this one. This is a pretty popular question.

To sum it up - build your time and network network network. Enjoy being an instructor, and have fun!
 

Ride High

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Continue instructing. While your at it meet and great as many pilots you see that come through your airport or the airports you do cross countries to with students. I have low time in the corporate world but luck helped me to get my current contract job. The more people you meet the better. It may not get you a job with 400hrs but it could play a role at the 1000hr point. Some people get lucky and others have to work at it longer. Keep your head up. Coca-cola hired two people with around 300hrs, so it happens, but not often. The best place to be is at a busy corporate airport, so if you can find one to instruct at you will meet alot of people. Good luck
 

XLDaddy

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What they said. Really it's good advice. Enjoy instructing, learn as much as you can and keep flying as much as you can. You will be surprised how quickly you will build your time and what different students teach you. If corporate flying is your long term goal, you must network and become familiar with the corporate flight departments in your local area. I was hanging around the airports in my area talking with the corporate guys even when I was not working. Show interest in the aircraft these guys/girls are flying. You'de be surprised how willing 90% of these pilots are willing to bs with someone with the sincere interest. Good luck.
 

Flying Illini

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as said above...network, network, network, and network some more. And remember, networking isn't hard. Just shooting the breeze is networking. Remember names and the faces that go with those names. I'm terrible with names but I never forget a face. For me I have to make a concientious <sp?> effort to recall the name later in the day after I've met someone new and once I've done it once, I can do it anytime. And remember, just because you don't think your qualified doesn't mean that the CP feels the same way...it worked for me. Keep dropping off those updated resumes, good things can happen in the blink of an eye.
Good luck!
 

onthebeach

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"Networking" is a general term. What you need is a specific course of action.

I recommend you look for employment with a corporate flight department in some ground support capacity. Probably the first jobs that come to mind in this category are hangar custodial work and/or aircraft detailing. I'm sure if you put your mind to it you can think of others.

These folks used to be called "hangar rats," not sure if that's still the case in these PC days.

However, by doing this you become a known quantity and an employee, rather than just somebody that shoots the breeze with department folks on a "when & if" basis.

I personally know of one "hangar rat" with less than 1000TT who was typed in a jet in a department in the northeast BEFORE he was ever moved up into a pilot slot. The rationale was, he was "in line" for a pilot position in the department as soon as an opening occurred, and they had an slot reserved at the training center they couldn't otherwise use, so...

Luck to you.
 

hammer2

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get a job instructing at a location that is corp. happy ie kads, peachtree or, or carlsbad. might help and accelerate your chances
 

mrdgst

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If you want to fly with one of the big companies, be sure you have a bachelors degree. It seems to be the minimum requirement these days.
 

semperfido

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mrdgst said:
If you want to fly with one of the big companies, be sure you have a bachelors degree. It seems to be the minimum requirement these days.

not according to pilotyip :)
 
Last edited:

Gulfstream 200

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semperfido said:
not according to pilotyip :)


you dont want to work where YIP does....

check out the 135 board if you have any doubt.
 

G100driver

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Get your BA .... or BS in my case. I worked line service while going taking a full course load.

I would get that out of the way before worrying about my CFI. Most guys, myslef included, want to hire people with more to offer than just flying a good airplane. Anyone can fly an airplane.

I ended up flight instructing AFTER I got out of school. My point in this is my networking and contacts I made while working line service were invaluable to me. It is from these contacts that have directly lead to my current successes and job position.

The contacts that you make today, along with being a well rounded person is what will bring you sucess in todays competative job market. The airlines are not exactly banging down the doors looking for qualified pilots like they were in late '90's. The ones that are, are offering guys a $24,000/year future. You must figure out how to seperate yourself from the pack of guys that are competing for the quality corporate jobs today. Not an easy task, I admit. But the world is full of no degree 3000 hour CFI's with 500 hours of multi.

Good luck.
 
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