Near Mid-air in BOS

millhouse21

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Has anybody else heard about this? There's a lot of talk about it onm PPRUNE. Mostly bashing US ATC.

http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20050624X00863&key=1


NTSB Identification: NYC05IA095A
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 129: Foreign operation of AER LINGUS IRISH INTERNATIONAL AIRL (D.B.A. Aer Lingus)
Incident occurred Thursday, June 09, 2005 in Boston, MA
Aircraft: Airbus Industrie A330-301, registration: EI-ORD
Injuries: 381 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.
On June 9, 2005, about 1940 eastern daylight time, an Airbus A330-301, EI-ORD, operated by Aer Lingus as flight 132 (EIN 132), and a Boeing 737-3B7, N394US, operated by US Airways as flight 1170 (USA 1170) were involved in a runway incursion at General Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport (BOS), Boston, Massachusetts. There were no injures to the 12 crew members, and 260 passengers on the Airbus, or the 6 crew members, and 103 passengers on the Boeing. Neither airplane was damaged. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed for both flights. Aer Lingus flight 132 was conducted under the provisions of CFR Part 129, and was destined for Shannon, Ireland. US Airways flight 1170 was conducted under the provisions of CFR Part 121, and was destined for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

According to initial information obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), both airplanes were under control of the BOS Air Traffic Control Tower. The Local Control West (LCW) controller was responsible for EIN 132 and the Local Control East (LCE) controller was responsible for USA 1170. At 1939:10, the LCW cleared EIN 132 for takeoff from runway 15R, a 10,083-foot-long, 150-foot-wide, asphalt runway. Five seconds later, the LCE cleared USA 1170 for departure from runway 9, a 7,000-foot-long, 150-foot-wide, asphalt runway.

The co-pilot of US Airways flight 1170 reported that he had called "V1," and then noticed the Aer Lingus A330 rotating just prior to the intersection of runways 15R and 9. He told the captain to "keep it down," and pushed the control column forward. He further stated:

"The Airbus passed overhead our aircraft with very little separation, and once clear of the intersection, the captain rotated, and we lifted off towards the end of the runway. I reported to departure control that we had a near miss at which time Aer Lingus reported 'we concur.'"

Both airplanes were equipped with flight data recorders, which were removed and forwarded to the Safety Board's Vehicle Recorders Division, Washington, DC.
 

EagleRJ

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It's only a matter of time before it happens at KBOS. Not even considering obvious mistakes like this, the controllers push their luck all the time with seperation. They've tried to kill me twice there, and I only flew out of there for six months!
It's absolutely vital for anyone flying out of BOS to be aware of what's happening on other runways.
 

Diesel

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Eh welcome to boston. Now get the F out.

Oh and 170 to RIPIT
 

labbats

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yikes!
 

Fury220

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Wankel7 said:
Man, bet they almost spilled their pints !

Bahahahaha!


Seriously, though...it looks like that Irish jet was one "cunning Lingus." :)
 

poorFITgrad'02

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Kbos?

Boston??

How 'bout DCA? Jesus Christmas, been going there all month and every single call seems to be 'don't stop on the runway', 'into position and hold, be ready to go, dont back taxi, your traffic in on a two mile final.' And my favorite, 'can you accept 33?' as your on short final, cause I want to be digging out the performance manual at that time. Granted you can turn them down. I will admit, they know how to keep it moving in a small space, but with a prohibited area around and short runways, seems like they are pushing it a little too much.

Maybe its me, but I'm BOS based and DCA seems to be much more sketchy.
 

KC-10 Driver

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All I can say is thank God the US Airways F/O was on his toes -- this could have been a disaster almost on a scale with Tenerife.
 

bigD

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KC-10 Driver said:
All I can say is thank God the US Airways F/O was on his toes -- this could have been a disaster almost on a scale with Tenerife.


No kidding - holy crap, that's scary.
 

zbwmy

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Fury220 said:
Bahahahaha!


Seriously, though...it looks like that Irish jet was one "cunning Lingus." :)


Now THAT was funny..........who says pilots have no......
 

PilotSkydiver

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My Personal Favorite at DCA....

"cleared for fast taxi..... expect takeoff clearance shortly"

or "position and hold power up"... while you see lights turning over the bridge... yikes
 

sky37d

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Holy Molly, that would cause me to need to change my pants. I don't understand why two different controllers are clearing for departure, on intersecting runways.

Wow.
Good job by the crews.
 

TIS

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poorFITgrad'02 said:
Maybe its me, but I'm BOS based and DCA seems to be much more sketchy.
OHHH, you have no idea!!!

My advice - DO NOT EVER ACCEPT 33 when it's proffered by ATC, particularly for takeoff.

Take a careful look at the airport diagram for DCA. To get tot 33 you have to cross two runways and you'll be on tower a grand total of about 38 seconds when they clear you to do something with that runway. Sounds pretty normal so far right?

Here's where you get bit. First, the fact that you're on tower for such a short time means that you won't have a lot of time to hear what the CONTEXT of your operation actually is - i.e. who's landing or taking off on 1 - you simply will not have the opportunity to hear the clearance when it's issued.

"Okay," you say, "I'll just look extra carefully for traffic now that I know I'm in a more vulnerable position using that runway." That's not as easy as it sounds much less as easy as it SHOULD be. You see, when you're cleared on to a runway the normal thing to do is have a look out the window and scan for traffic. Usually, there's an obligatory "clear right" and a "clear left" and the your good right? Not at DCA - not by a LONG stretch.

At DCA the geometry of the airport is such that when you're in position on 33 you must look BEHIND you just to see the threshold of runway 1. The approach corridor is another matter altogether. The viewing angle that you must be able to achieve is 31° aft just to see the threshold.

“No problem,” you say again, “I’ll make sure I take a good look behind me next time, okay?” NO! Not okay. Not all aircraft are created equal. There is no uniform standard for cockpit visibility except the provision in Part 25 that says the windows have to provide enough visibility to the pilots for them to be able to perform their jobs.

Some aircraft are configured with wings on top of the fuselage and two that go in to DCA (or at least used to) with performance good enough for 33 are the Do-Jet and the Dash-8. You just try looking 31° behind and up in one of those planes. All you’re gonna see is engine and wing and not much else.

The upshot of all this is that depending on what aircraft type you’re in you may be SUBSTANTIALLY more threatened than you realize. If you’re in a Dash-8 departing from 33 you have no idea who’s on final or where they are on final because they were cleared to land long before you were ever on frequency. It is physically impossible for you to look for yourself and see an impending threat because of aircraft structures in the way.

And then tower clears you for takeoff without quoting the traffic on final – as they’re supposed to – because, well, they just made a mistake. How’s that for a scenario? Seen it happen.

It’s worth pointing out, in conclusion, that noting what type of airplane is sitting on 33 if you’re on final to 1 at DCA is also a good idea. It tells you something about what is and what is NOT possible from the OTHER pilot’s point of view.

Just FYI.

TIS
 

TIS

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sky37d said:
I don't understand why two different controllers are clearing for departure, on intersecting runways.

Yeah, that's our FAA! Serving the needs of aviation - one mistake at a time!
 

GIVDrvr

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In spite of unfortunate events like this the US runs the safest airspace system in the world. No one comes close, for example Southern California Tracon runs more air traffic annually than all of Europe combined.
 

bandit110

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Yeah I agree, good job Airways. Seems they have a habit of fixing controller mistakes up there. Wasn't it BOS where the United got lost in the fog and tower tried to launch Airways?
 

Diesel

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no that was PVD and the biatch controller there.
 

shamrock

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That controller really was a biatch. Glad they stood up to her.
 
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