NASA Reporting

PUNISHER

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Does anyone know if the NASA reporting system applies to Canada?
 

avbug

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Are you asking if the ASRS takes reports from outside the US? If it's restricted to submissions by only US Citizens? Canadians are allowed to submit reports? Or are you asking if Canada extends the same protection provisions as the FAA to submitters in enforcement action?
 

PUNISHER

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I am asking if Canada participates in the ASRS program?(i.e. if you f--- up in Canada should you file a report?)
 

JAFI

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AC No: 00-46D

3. BACKGROUND. *

b. …Current ASRS operations are conducted in accordance with an MOA executed by FAA and NASA on January 14,1994.



MOA is “Memorandum of Agreement” in this case between the FAA and NTSB, so (Transport) Canada is not part of the US ASRS program. I do not know if Transport Canada has any program like the ASRS program.

Here is Transport Canada’s web site:

http://www.tc.gc.ca/

JAFI
 

Geronimo4497

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PUNISHER said:
I am asking if Canada participates in the ASRS program?(i.e. if you f--- up in Canada should you file a report?)

I would file one. If the CNDs come after you, they won't take away your CND certificates (I'm assuming you don't have any). I would bet the the FAA would try to bring some crap down on you if they did catch word of it from Transport Canada, so having one on file may not hurt, IMHO.
 

JAFI

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Geronimo4497 said:
I would bet the the FAA would try to bring some crap down on you if they did catch word of it from Transport Canada.

Really, ... How much would you bet????? I may wish to cover that bet.

Would you please explain (with references, please) how the FAA has any jurisdiction over Canadian airspace. What US regulation covers airspace deviations in other countries?

Just courious.

JAFI
 

Geronimo4497

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I don't have any references, you are correct. I would, however, recommend him to W.H.A. (watch his ass)
 

501261

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91.703?

JAFI said:
Really, ... How much would you bet????? I may wish to cover that bet.

Would you please explain (with references, please) how the FAA has any jurisdiction over Canadian airspace. What US regulation covers airspace deviations in other countries?

Just courious.

JAFI
Funny you mentioned that. There was a discussion some time back regarding the use of non-type rated SIC's internationally (specifically Brazil) and some people where of the opinion that not just where you breaking Brazil's rules, you were also violating the FAR's.

I had always wondered what a "JAFI" would do if say you got a letter for Canada stating that an FAA airman had landed below minimums or something like that.

§ 91.703 Operations of civil aircraft of U.S. registry outside of the United States.
(a) Each person operating a civil aircraft of U.S. registry outside of the United States shall—
(1) When over the high seas, comply with annex 2 (Rules of the Air) to the Convention on International Civil Aviation and with §§91.117(c), 91.127, 91.129, and 91.131;
(2) When within a foreign country, comply with the regulations relating to the flight and maneuver of aircraft there in force;
(3) Except for §§91.307(b), 91.309, 91.323, and 91.711, comply with this part so far as it is not inconsistent with applicable regulations of the foreign country where the aircraft is operated or annex 2 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation; and
(4) When operating within airspace designated as Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) airspace, comply with §91.705. When operating within airspace designated as Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM) airspace, comply with §91.706.
 

JAFI

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501261 said:
Funny you mentioned that. There was a discussion some time back regarding the use of non-type rated SIC's internationally (specifically Brazil) and some people where of the opinion that not just where you breaking Brazil's rules, you were also violating the FAR's.

I had always wondered what a "JAFI" would do if say you got a letter for Canada stating that an FAA airman had landed below minimums or something like that.

§ 91.703 Operations of civil aircraft of U.S. registry outside of the United States.
(a) Each person operating a civil aircraft of U.S. registry outside of the United States shall—
(1) When over the high seas, comply with annex 2 (Rules of the Air) to the Convention on International Civil Aviation and with §§91.117(c), 91.127, 91.129, and 91.131;
(2) When within a foreign country, comply with the regulations relating to the flight and maneuver of aircraft there in force;
(3) Except for §§91.307(b), 91.309, 91.323, and 91.711, comply with this part so far as it is not inconsistent with applicable regulations of the foreign country where the aircraft is operated or annex 2 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation; and
(4) When operating within airspace designated as Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) airspace, comply with §91.705. When operating within airspace designated as Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM) airspace, comply with §91.706.

Thank you for the reference. I do not know or have all the rules memorized so references are important. In first post (Canada example) it would be a question of jurisdiction. I know of no CFR that would apply to incidents in other countries. (Your reference above I will have to look at, but for now I know of none.) As far as FAA Operations Inspectors abroad, well there are none in Europe and One in the Pacific Rim. So much for doing violations abroad. In the US any investigation is normally done at the geographical location of the occurrence (nearest FSDO) not where you took off or landed. No foreign country has asked me for information about a US pilot and I have not asked any foreign country for their information.

As far as a letter from Canada to a FSDO, I have never seen one or heard about any such case. So I have no information on that subjuct.

Different countries operate by different rules. If you fly in that countries airspace you better know what you are doing or you may get to experience their "court" system. The type rating issue is just such a case. Some countries require both pilots to have a type others do not. With out looking at a reference, I think with ICAO rules both pilots must be type rated. But ICAO is not accepted by every country. So be careful where you go. Their "Federallies" may not be as pleasent as some of us are.

As far as Geronimo's "bet", well I was just hoping to pick up some quick cash. His comment to be careful is always wise. But to "bet" on information he does not have would be cash in my pocket.

JAFI
 

NuGuy

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JAFI said:
Really, ... How much would you bet????? I may wish to cover that bet.

Would you please explain (with references, please) how the FAA has any jurisdiction over Canadian airspace. What US regulation covers airspace deviations in other countries?

Just courious.

JAFI

I don't know if this is what you asking, but a fairly large slice of airspace Canadian territory is controlled by Cleveland Center. It mostly runs from east of DTW, over Windsor, to Buffalo.

DTW approach also controls airspace over Canadian national territory.

Nu
 

ToiletDuck

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JAFI said:
Thank you for the reference. I do not know or have all the rules memorized so references are important. In first post (Canada example) it would be a question of jurisdiction. I know of no CFR that would apply to incidents in other countries. (Your reference above I will have to look at, but for now I know of none.) As far as FAA Operations Inspectors abroad, well there are none in Europe and One in the Pacific Rim. So much for doing violations abroad. In the US any investigation is normally done at the geographical location of the occurrence (nearest FSDO) not where you took off or landed. No foreign country has asked me for information about a US pilot and I have not asked any foreign country for their information.

As far as a letter from Canada to a FSDO, I have never seen one or heard about any such case. So I have no information on that subjuct.

Different countries operate by different rules. If you fly in that countries airspace you better know what you are doing or you may get to experience their "court" system. The type rating issue is just such a case. Some countries require both pilots to have a type others do not. With out looking at a reference, I think with ICAO rules both pilots must be type rated. But ICAO is not accepted by every country. So be careful where you go. Their "Federallies" may not be as pleasent as some of us are.

As far as Geronimo's "bet", well I was just hoping to pick up some quick cash. His comment to be careful is always wise. But to "bet" on information he does not have would be cash in my pocket.

JAFI

That's only if of US regestry. So if you fly a katana or something like that it most likely won't be.
 
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