Logbook Question

buckeyeflyer

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I am getting ready to apply at a couple regionals and upon reviewing my logbook I have run across an issue. At some point about halfway through my logbook, I must fat fingered something on the calculator and my page totals are a little off. My ASEL + AMEL don't equal my total time (off by about 6hrs) and my PIC + my dual received don't equal my total (off by about 4.5hrs.) First of all, I wanted to get opinions about how big a deal that is going to be when someone looks at my logbook. Second, if it is a big deal how should I go about fixing it? Should I white-out my page totals at the bottom and correct them? (I have been told to never use white-out in my logbook)

I'm just looking for some advice here, I don't want to cause myself any issues when I go into an interview. Any help is greatly appreciated!
 

Flyerdan

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I prefer making logbook corrections by lining through and initialing. That way it doesn't look like you are hiding anything. The important thing to remember is it's your logbook. Technically, you don't even have to log your time except to show recency of experience, etc. You will find that as long as you have the experience needed for a flying job and can talk an interviewer through what is written in your logbook, you won't get hassled too much. Good luck on your interviews.
 

centralpilot

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From now on do the totals in pencil
My first flight instructor told me to do that and I've been doing it ever since. It has allowed me to easily fix mistakes that I found months after the fact. However, I've recently started wondering if this practice might give interviewers any heartburn. It didn't come up during my regional airline interviews, but I still wonder. Anyone think this would be a problem if noticed?
 

viper548

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I've always done it in pencil. My first flight instructor told me to do it that way. I interviewed with SkyWest and Northwest and neither said anything about it
 

rickair7777

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Put in a correction entry....that small amount of time being corrected shouldn't make any interviewer ask questions.
This is the cleanest way to do it, avoids having to re-total everything. Re-totaling might work for a 400 hour CFI, but it kind of blows for a 4000 hour airline pilot with three logbooks.

An entry like this hides nothing, ues the next free line put today's date, put the correction (add or subtract) in the needed column(s) and then make a note in the comments stating the reason (math error, etc) and the date of the original error.
 

centralpilot

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This is the cleanest way to do it, avoids having to re-total everything. Re-totaling might work for a 400 hour CFI, but it kind of blows for a 4000 hour airline pilot with three logbooks.
Valid point. Even using pencil for totals, I wouldn't bother re-totaling if I discovered an error more than a few pages back. There is nothing at all wrong with a correction line.
 

BLing

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my PIC + my dual received don't equal my total (off by about 4.5hrs.) [/quote]

Your PIC + Dual Received will not = Total Time. Think about the times you received dual and acted as PIC while pursuing your post private ratings.

I know logbooks real well. I have analyzed over 150 of them prior to signing students off for checkrides back in the day. You are not alone thinking your PIC and Dual should equal total time. Many people including myself have confused this issue.

I use logbook pro as my backup. Before I total my paper logbook, I double check the totals for each page on logbook pro. It has saved me a few times. However, I did have a small error that required a correction entry. It looks clean.
 

atlcrashpad

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6hrs and 4.5hrs?
Heck dats good....
I wuz off by twennyfif hrs when I dun mine.... bouyyyyyy.....
 

SeanAucoin

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PENCIL PENCIL PENCIL! I learned that on day 2 of private pilot! NOt a problem, I've used green out, in places where I didnt want to have it all scratchy.

Best of luck in the interviewS!
 

AWACO

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In 251 hrs you have a math error?

Take your logbook problems as a sign...seek another career.
 

DrewBlows

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I don't know if there is a 'correct' way to do it, but the most 'professional' way to do it, in my opinion, is to audit your logbook, make any corrections by drawing a single line through the mistake, write the correction next to the mistake, and initial it. Then use a correction line with a note explaining it so the totals add up.

I also suggest going electronic if you haven't already. I audited my logbook when I had about 1200 hours and backed it up electronically at the same time. In all I think there were about 12 hours of errors, all of which I found and corrected. The whole process took a few weeks and was extremely frustrating at times but well worth the trouble. When I finished my first logbook I went totally electronic. For interviews (and a check-ride) I print it out at FedExKinkos. It looks perfect and there are no addition errors so there is little time spent on the logbook during the interview.

Oh, almost forgot...the first thing and interviewer will likely do is add up your single and multi-engine time and compare it to your total time, so it should add up. The next thing they will do is look for all of your check-rides. I suggest tabbing them to make the interviewer's job easier.

Good luck with your interviews.
 

DrewBlows

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In 251 hrs you have a math error?

Take your logbook problems as a sign...seek another career.
If you didn't have a math error at 250 hours, you are likely the only pilot in the history of aviation not to. Congratulations! You probably have never had a bad landing either, right?
 
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