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Logbook Pro

legendskid_44

Need a job
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Apr 22, 2007
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I just wanted to see who used logbook pro before i buy it. Is it worth the money? whats your likes and dislikes about it? any other info? would you recommend it?
 

Tristar

..one in the wilderness
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Mar 25, 2004
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I switched from another (no longer supported) log program to Logbook Pro a year ago. I haven't taken the time to really get to know and use the program well, but I'm quite happy with it.

I am EXTREMELY happy with the customer support I have received! I also am trying to use their APDL program, and while we haven't worked out all the kinks with importing my airlines schedules, the responsiveness of the folks there has been great.

I highly recommend this company and their products.
 

Tristar

..one in the wilderness
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You've got to be kidding me, right?!?

Jeppesen Professional Pilot Logbook - $25.
Lot's of pages, but you'll eventually fill it up. You are free to make all of the simple (but hard to find) math error you want, and you'll have lots of time to reminisce over your past experiences as you try to conjure up how much piston night instrument time you have since your private license while filling out a myriad of job applications. As a bonus, if your like me, the interviewers will get to look at your penmanship which looks like a third graders (guaranteed to impress)!

Logbook Pro Standard Edition - $70 (you don't need the add ons, at least not to get started). You'll never fill it up and need to buy another logbook, you won't have math errors that you can't find, and you'll save hours upon hours when it come time to fill out job applications. Interviewers instead can look a neatly filled out pages of information (sans white out), with plenty of reports detailing your flight experience, which in effect says: "Look at all of my information - it's all right here for you. I have nothing to hide, I am the consumate professional."

BTW - you don't need to use LBP's printing service (though I'm sure they do a fine job). Print your logbook to a PDF file and take it to your local Kinko's where they can double side print and drill it for you. I'm sure they could bind it as well, but I find a two hole 8.5x11 ledger binder (available from a real office supply store - not an Office Despot) works very well, makes a nice presentation, and allows you to continue to add pages as you go.

Also, I'm sure you can cook up your own program using a Excel or Access, but for me a turnkey solution was and is a much better, easier answer.

And again, no I don't work for nor am I compensated by the folks at LBP in any way, shape, or form. I'm just very satisfied with their product and service. BTW - search the interview section here a couple other flight message boards, I think you'll find pretty unanimous agreement that LBP is very popular and well recieved by interviewers. Your milage may vary . . .

PS - My additional suggestion would be to make the switch to electronic now, while you are (I presume) relatively low time. Go back to day one, enter all of you flights into the logbook. Scan all of your endorsements/checkrides/ect into PDFs, reprint them and add them to the binder you keep your electronic log printouts in. Put your original logbooks in a safe place (safe deposit box, firesafe, under your mattress, whatever). E-mail those PDF's along with the backup files from your e-logbook to yourself every six months or so. You are now virtually free from worries about lost/stolen logbooks.
 
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av8tordude23

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A LOT
Also, I'm sure you can cook up your own program using a Excel or Access, but for me a turnkey solution was and is a much better, easier answer.

You solidified my point! Why spend that kind of money when you could create one. But I agree with you on one thing...if you are not knowlegeable in in excel, a turn key solution would be a desirable choice. But on that note, there are less expensive software on the market.

Once you buy the expensive programs and the infactuation stage is over, you find yourself only using 1/4 of the features.

Point being, be a smart shopper!
 

legendskid_44

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Apr 22, 2007
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thanks for the advice, i got the paycheck in the mail and bought the Professional one so i don't have to spend the extra money later on to upgrade.

Filled in all the information, started from day one and read all the comments that were made by my instructor....like going back to the old days....6 years ago. haha.

I like the program, I found some mistakes with the adding in the written log book so it was good to fix those errors.

Questions for you Ripe Pilots (yes Tristar i'm a low time pilot) out there. in my log book it has XC and XC over 50 miles. Now from my understanding is that if a flight goes to another airport and lands its XC. Correct? Now that i have those two sections in my logbook, do i just log them both under Cross Country time in LogBook Pro to get one big time?

I also have to go back and figure out what time i was Solo in the AC b/c i stopped logging solo time after i got my private and every license i got after that i had to go back and figure it out for the 8710 form. Once done, the next time i fill that 8710 form out it should be easier b/c they have that nice button on LogBook Pro that filles it out automaticly!!:pimp:
 
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av8tordude23

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Questions for you Ripe Pilots (yes Tristar i'm a low time pilot) out there. in my log book it has XC and XC over 50 miles. Now from my understanding is that if a flight goes to another airport and lands its XC. Correct? Now that i have those two sections in my logbook, do i just log them both under Cross Country time in LogBook Pro to get one big time?

You should only log xctry time for flights made over 50 nm. All others, leave the xctry time blank. It makes you logging experience less complicated.
 

atpcliff

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Nov 26, 2001
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Hi!

With an elec logbook, you may want to break out your crosscountry flying with a PIC XC column.

Lately, I've had a number of places ask for my XC, and then want my XC PIC, also.

cliff
GRB
 

regionalcap

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You made the right choice. When it comes to filling out applications, it makes life so much easier. The last interviewer for me seemed to like the electronic logbook.
 

legendskid_44

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Apr 22, 2007
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I'm liking it so far, when i get my flight instructing job it will be nice a easy to fill it out quickly since i got the PDA version today.

but for right now, i'm sitting with only 3 flights for this year only....no money and living in michigan sucks right now for flight instructing
 

avbug

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You should only log xctry time for flights made over 50 nm. All others, leave the xctry time blank. It makes you logging experience less complicated.

The 50 nm requirement only applies to certain airman certification requirements. Logging cross country between two points is valid for those seeking 135 privileges for their first job...and logging cross country for flights of 50 nm that don't include a landing at a point other than the point of departure is also valid for one seeking the ATP.

Many who arrive at those two critical points (applying for ATP, and seeking that first 135 job) may not have all the cross country they need to fill the boxes if restricting themselves to only logging 50 nm flights between two points. Keeping track of all the time in all it's relevant forms is important to someone just starting out.
 

Hamburger

*************************
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I've run Logbook Pro for years now. I am extremely pleased with the product.

Especially early in the game, every damn application you fill out will want a different set of minutia concerning your time. On top of that, every company has different requirements. Some will count Mil Helo time as Turb PIC, some won't. Southwest accepts Caravan time as Turb PIC, while most others don't. Logbook pro will crunch the numbers any way you want. You are going to be filling out a LOT of applications in the future and will definately make a mistake with a paper logbook. I can't wait to upgrade my cell phone so I can run the PDA sync.
 

av8tordude23

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The 50 nm requirement only applies to certain airman certification requirements. Logging cross country between two points is valid for those seeking 135 privileges for their first job...and logging cross country for flights of 50 nm that don't include a landing at a point other than the point of departure is also valid for one seeking the ATP.

If you have landings at two different airports less then 50nm logged in your logbook, then there is no need to log xtry :rolleyes:. Just filter your logbook for this information.
 

avbug

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If you have landings at two different airports less then 50nm logged in your logbook, then there is no need to log xtry

Actually, there is. Cross country need not be more than 50 nm.
 

av8tordude23

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Why would you need to log xctry for flights less then 50 nm? (aside for applying for a job, IMO, is not necessary)
 

avbug

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Why would you need to log xctry for flights less then 50 nm? (aside for applying for a job, IMO, is not necessary)

See previous posts; already asked and answered.

However, as you didn't get it before, let's try again.

For the new pilot seeking his or her first 135 job under VFR, 100 hours of cross country is required. For IFR, 500 hours of cross country. It's very possible that many applicants who have been flight instructing, flying skydivers, doing tours, or other things to get to their requisite 500 or 1,200 hours for that first job...won't have 100 or 500 hours of cross country time if they simply use the 50 nm rule.

For the pilot needing to meet the qualifications of 14 CFR 135.243(b)(2) or (c)(2), then the cross country definition provided under 61.1(b)(3)(i) applies. This means demonstrating cross country flying not beyond 50 nm but simply between two points with a landing at a point other than the point of departure, and involving some form of navigation.

On the other hand, for the individual seeking his ATP, the cross country provision of 61.1(b)(3)(vi)(b). This means that a point other than a point of landing isn't required...but a straight-line distance greater than 50 nm is.

Depending on one's particular requirements, then the classification and applicability of the time logged change. Certainly there exists a valid reason to log cross country time when the distance does not exceed 50 nm. Do you understand this?
 

legendskid_44

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Sounds good to me!! I have it logged under two columns (xc, xc greater then 50nm) in the written log book. Later on, I'll be seeking my ATP so I will log the XC >50nm for that.
 
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