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King air 90 vs 200

plucky

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Just curious as to the difference in fuel burn between King Air 90 and the 200. Also do you need a type for the King air 200?
 

say again

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Don't know the fuel burn differences, but I know a type is not needed for the 200.
 

User546

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No types needed for any King Air's except the 300 and 350 series.
 

Geronimo4497

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300 is a higher gross weight version of the 200, as I understand it. 200 has "smiles" for air inlets, while the 300's inlets are rectangular. That' the only way I can tell them apart.


350 is longer, with a double club arrangement.
Not sure if there is a type difference between the 300/350. I would hope not, they must fly pretty much the same. Oh yeah, chicks digs winglets (and money). :D
 

BE200Driver

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not sure which model 90 you are asking about but in the 200 we see 800lbs/hour down low and 600-650 at the higher altitudes. It can get better but we never get out of the low 20's.

the E90 at max cruise power @10,000 will brun about 700/hour. Up in the low 20's 450-500/hour.

The 300 has a MTOW of 14,000 vs the 200's 12,500
 
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User546

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minitour said:
Which are the same type, correct?
Yeap, same type. Sorry for the confusion.

And from what I've been told, back in the day the King Air type rating also encompassed the Beech 1900 as well. But they've since changed it to where the 1900 is a different type.
 
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minitour

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User997 said:
Yeap, same type. Sorry for the confusion.

No worries...

I've also heard they're similar to the Beech 1900...any authoritative sources out there care to chime in?

-mini
 

cvsfly

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BE200Driver said:
not sure which model 90 you are asking about but in the 200 we see 800lbs/hour down low and 600-650 at the higher altitudes. It can get better but we never get out of the low 20's.

the E90 at max cruise power @10,000 will brun about 700/hour. Up in the low 20's 450-500/hour.

The 300 has a MTOW of 14,000 vs the 200's 12,500

I agree. Our B200 (PT6-42 = 850 shp) operates 350 hrs Block/310 Flight (Hobbs) per year. Average 1.4 Block/leg, 1.2 Flight/leg and 98 gal/Block Hour at 6.7 lbs/gal = 656 lbs/hr. Mix of legs as short as 50 nm and up to 900 nm, average 276 nm/leg and altitudes 5000 to FL 270, probably averaging FL 220 - 230. We run at 750 ITT or 2050 ft-lbs and 270 (summer)-275 KTAS (winter) (based in the South) at altitude. Training notes I have put a C-90 (PT6A-21= 550 shp) at 500# 1st hr, 400# 2nd hr if above FL180 and a 200 (PT6-41= 850 shp) at 700# 1st hr, 600 # after if above FL220.
 

JimG

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cvsfly said:
I agree. Our B200 (PT6-42 = 850 shp) operates 350 hrs Block/310 Flight (Hobbs) per year. Average 1.4 Block/leg, 1.2 Flight/leg and 98 gal/Block Hour at 6.7 lbs/gal = 656 lbs/hr. Mix of legs as short as 50 nm and up to 900 nm, average 276 nm/leg and altitudes 5000 to FL 270, probably averaging FL 220 - 230. We run at 750 ITT or 2050 ft-lbs and 270 (summer)-275 KTAS (winter) (based in the South) at altitude. Training notes I have put a C-90 (PT6A-21= 550 shp) at 500# 1st hr, 400# 2nd hr if above FL180 and a 200 (PT6-41= 850 shp) at 700# 1st hr, 600 # after if above FL220.


whoa....

I've been choked up about the 40 gal/hour block fuel flows I've been burning in my 340, since trading up from a Bonanza.

I know you can't really compare the two like apples to apples, but out of curiosity....what kind of airspeeds are you getting out of the E90 and 200 while in the low 20's?
 

say again

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minitour said:
No worries...

I've also heard they're similar to the Beech 1900...any authoritative sources out there care to chime in?

-mini

The 1900 and 300/350 used to be a common type, but since has become two seperate types.
 

BE200Driver

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We file for 270 Ktas in the B200
 

cvsfly

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JimG said:
whoa....

I've been choked up about the 40 gal/hour block fuel flows I've been burning in my 340, since trading up from a Bonanza.

I know you can't really compare the two like apples to apples, but out of curiosity....what kind of airspeeds are you getting out of the E90 and 200 while in the low 20's?

Apples - Oranges. As indicated, we get/file for 270 KTAS - B200 - PT6-42 and about 17 min to FL240 in summer. And note our Block Fuel flow is done from engine start to shutdown. I meant to add that the training notes given to me for the above example of a C-90 -PT6-21 flight plan 210 KTAS and the straight 200 -PT6-41 is 250 KTAS.
 

CapnVegetto

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A 300 isn't a GW increased 200. It's a 200 body with 350 engines. GROSSLY overpowered. The dam thing will almost outrun a Citation and will climb like a homesick angel. Awesome airplane.
 

BE200Driver

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Actually, the 350 has the 300 engines, the -60's. The 300 started production in 84 and the 350 in 1989 or 90.

Just a technicality I know but hey. You are right though. I love flying the 300. Best KA in my opinion.

200/B200= 850hp a side
300/350= 1050hp a side

Pretty good deal on the 300. an extra 400hp for 1500lbs higher MTOW.
 
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mike1mc

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In our C90B we get 230 KTAS and about 200pph in the low 20s
 

BE200Driver

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220 per side right? If not then that's pretty darn good, lol
 

Kingairrick

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The 300 is the best King Air by far. The horsepower only tells a part of the story. When you convert the numbers to torque, the 300 has 3500lbs+ per side VS the 200's 2200 lbs for the same airframe. a Lightly loaded 300 will climb @ 6000 fpm.

Also, same type as the 350. The type was split from the 1900s when the 1900D came out.
 

Diesel

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Actually a 200 has 750 a side. a b200 has 850 a side.

i recomend the b200 over the straight 200 any day. plus with some raiseback mods u can do wonderful things. i have done fl330 in a b200. made for a long flight but the ff were worth it.

the converted lonestar b 90 i fly we plan for 247kts. and about 70 gallons an hour.
 

BE200Driver

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Again not to nitpick but the 200 and B200 have 850 a side each. The only difference is that the straight 200 is temp limited over the B200. Can't carry as much torque as high in the straight 200 over the B model.

-41's and -42's are both rated to 850hp
 
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