King Air 350 Type?

JetMonkey

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Anyone know who does the King Air 350 type rating here in the states? I've done online searches but all I come up with are courses for the 90 and 200 which I believe you don't even really need a type rating. The only place I've found is somewhere in the UK.
 

JakeSnake

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FlightSafety ATL, ICT, LGB (300), and SimuFlite DFW just to name a few.
 

JetMonkey

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thanks guys.
 

avbug

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The 200 also requires a type rating, for certain models over 12,500 lbs (C-12). Otherwise, no...standard civil models don't require the type.

The 350 definitely does require a type, and training for the type is available at several locations in the US.
 

kingairyahoo

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The 200 also requires a type rating, for certain models over 12,500 lbs (C-12). Otherwise, no...standard civil models don't require the type.
...and your wording comes across confusing :p

to clarify, a KingAir 200 does not require a type.

most any yahoo that does have a KingAir 200 type are ex-military, and it was given by UncleSam...hence it does them no good whatsoever out here ;)
 

avbug

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to clarify, a KingAir 200 does not require a type.

most any yahoo that does have a KingAir 200 type are ex-military, and it was given by UncleSam...hence it does them no good whatsoever out here ;)
Flight Safety International issues the type rating in the 200, in the US, and it's a standard type rating internationally.

Not just military fly the BE-20 over 12,500 lbs, incidentally...and what good it does is entirely irrelevant. The BE-20 is certificated to greater weights, and does require a type rating when operated at those weights.
 

kingairyahoo

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Flight Safety International issues the type rating in the 200, in the US, and it's a standard type rating internationally.

Not just military fly the BE-20 over 12,500 lbs, incidentally...and what good it does is entirely irrelevant. The BE-20 is certificated to greater weights, and does require a type rating when operated at those weights.
sigh, im not biting at your heels man...relax...ill bet your a hoot to fly with :erm:

yes, FSI gives the type, mostly to military guys...as i stated. theres a reason the FAA barely recognizes the type, but im sure you knew that :p

im also acutely aware of the fact that there are other entities that utilize the aircraft for which it was designed...not the point :rolleyes:

point was to RTFQ...

Anyone know who does the King Air 350 type rating here in the states? I've done online searches but all I come up with are courses for the 90 and 200 which I believe you don't even really need a type rating. The only place I've found is somewhere in the UK.
...hes asking about "in the states", not internationally as you so eloquently point out. then the other side, is a 200 in which "you don't even really need a type rating"...for which he is correct. if you would like to do a survey of all the 200 operators, i will guarantee the percentage that utilizes the aircraft in its designed capacity is very minute...but ill leave that up to you ;)

...cheers :beer:
 

avbug

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theres a reason the FAA barely recognizes the type, but im sure you knew that :p
The FAA most definitely recognizes the type...the FAA issues it, after all, and it's a privilege accorded by the Administrator.

The FAA does not "recognize" one type more than another; a type rating is a type rating.
 

pin727

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1900 and Be 300 used to be the same type but our friends in the FAA changed it yrs ago!!!
 

kingairyahoo

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The FAA most definitely recognizes the type...the FAA issues it, after all, and it's a privilege accorded by the Administrator.

The FAA does not "recognize" one type more than another; a type rating is a type rating.
...unless its a C12, for according to too many FSDO's, having it would "lure" one into flying just any old B200 over its limit and no-one would wanna do that :D
 

avbug

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"According to too many FSDO's?"

What is one supposed to make of that? The opinion of anyone at the FSDO level isn't really relevant, nor is it particularly significant. Which FSDO's? A FSDO has an opinion? Really?

What are you attempting to say, here? Policy is policy. Regulation is regulation. What those at the FSDO level have to say about that is insignificant, and certainly does not represent, nor interpret the position of the Administrator.

The FAA does not favor, nor disfavor the type. It's just a type rating...like any other.
 

N1VIBS

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Flight Safety in Atlanta now has 2 350 simulators. One is for the older 350's (whatever that is, I know nothing about King Airs), but the new one is all glass cockpit with all the bells and whistles. Hope that helps.
 

satpak77

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Flight Safety in Atlanta now has 2 350 simulators. One is for the older 350's (whatever that is, I know nothing about King Airs), but the new one is all glass cockpit with all the bells and whistles. Hope that helps.
The "older" King Airs would be year models up to about 2003.

Observe that on Jan 1, 2003, one minute past midnight, the new Proline's didn't just pop up on ramps. It took Beech some engineering time before they came out (obviously).

By refining the office up front, it was kind of Beech's answer to all the spiffy light jets, Citation CJ's, etc etc coming onto the market in the early 2000's.
 
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