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Jumpseating vs. Non-Rev....

hyper

We got "change" alright.
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What exactly is the difference? Non-revving is basically riding for free on a non-revenue generating ticket, and jumpseating is riding for free as well, yes?

Thanks Airtran guys for getting me home last night. Nice ride in a brand new 717.

P.S. Do the 717s have a higher climb angle then most?
 

enigma

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Jumpseating is what a properly qualified, (currently employeed at another certificated carrier which reciprocates) pilot does when he wants to go somewhere. Usually used for commuting back and forth to work. It is called jumpseating because you are technically using the cockpit jumpseat, even when you sit in the back. Since 9/11, the actual jumpseat has been off limits to "offline" (don't work there) pilots; but most carriers still allow an offline pilot to "jumpseat", he just has to use a seat in the back.

Non-reving means that you possess a ticket. The ticket may not cost anything, but it is still a ticket. Most of the time you must arrange for that ticket from your own airlines pass bureau; a process that takes some time depending upon your carrier.

Only pilots are able to "jumpseat", while any airline employ can "non-rev". Actually FA's can jumpseat as well, using the cabin FA jumpseat.
My carrier allows an offline pilot to ride the FA jumpseat, now if only the carrier I use to get to work would do the same.

BTW, jumpseating is an extremely valuable privilege, don't abuse it.

8N
 

hyper

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Thanks enigma, I appreciate the clarification.
 

siedkick

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There are also more responsibilities involved when jumpseating than when traveling as a non revenue passenger. When jumpseating, you are considered part of the crew and as such are expected to provide assistance if it is requested. This of course means no drinking when jumpseating (hold the HP jokes please). This is true whichever side of the cockpit door you may be riding on.

Enigma, who do you fly for that allows pilots in a F/A seat? That could be handy info.
 

skydiverdriver

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Enigma,
You are correct, exept for the part about pilots being the only ones who can jumpseat in the cockpit. Dispatchers are also qualified to jumpseat, and are actually the only certificated airman that are required to jumpseat in order to stay current. They used to be allowed on other airlines, but just as pilots, are no longer able. Also, many ops manuals allow mechanics to jumpseat, and even flight attendants on their own airline. Others can be approved, like management or representatives of the manufacturer of aircraft or avionics, but they have to have a seat in the back available. FAA and ATC are also allowed, but the fam rides are currently not being offered due to 9/11 fallout.

A non-rev just means non-revenue passenger, and would include jumpseaters and people traveling on a pass. Pilots cannot usually ride in the FA jumpseat unless they are a trained flight attendant. Hope this helps.
 

fletch717

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non rev vs Jumpseat

hyper,

To answer your question about the B-717, when the weight is entered in the FMS it automatically sets V1 VR V2 speeds. When we take-off, we rotate at a rate of about 2 1/2 degrees per second so we don't have a tail strike. By the time we are off the ground we are usually afew knots faster than V2, so the pitch bar will command a higher angle so the airplane will climb at V2 until we reach our acceleration altitude usually 3000 agl. hope this answers your question.

Fletch
 

active_herk

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enigma,

I heard some of the airlines are now allowing offline guys access to the cockpit jumpseat. i've been activated since mid-Dec so haven't been able to jumpseat and don't know the particulars. Is there any truth to this?
 

hyper

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Thanks Fletch!
 

enigma

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active_herk said:
enigma,

I heard some of the airlines are now allowing offline guys access to the cockpit jumpseat. i've been activated since mid-Dec so haven't been able to jumpseat and don't know the particulars. Is there any truth to this?

Unfortunately, I think that rumor falls into the false catagory.

8N
 

LR25

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I still havent figured out why we "airline pilots" cant ride the jumpseat on other airlines.

Is the worry that someone will fake an ID from another airline, and if so, they couldnt fake an ID from our "own" airline to gain access?

Whats the difference when someone from your airline comes up front for the jumpseat or from another airline? You look at the persons ID, you shake there hand, and you go about your business.

All its doing is screwing people from commuting. Nothing like watching the airplanes back out of the gate with 1 or 2 empty seats up front.
 

dispatchguy

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As a commuting dispatcher, I wholeheartedly agree, however, the crux is immediate employment verification for the offliner - is he/she who they say they are? Right after the post-9/11 ops restart, there was a report of an idiot (pilot) who OMC'ed on UAL, after having been fired from his airline. He acted all flaky in flight, F/A reports it to the captain, who ended up calling his airline and found out he was persona-non-grata. Thanks a$$hole.

At my airline, we will allow some offline pilots (just code share regionals) to ride flight deck jumpseat only if there are no seats in the back - that is in our FOM. The reason they can is that, since they use the same computer system that we do, their employment status is immediately verifiable prior to boarding.

For example, in our computer system, when the agent punches in my badge number, it says "certified airman - flight deck access permitted", and I am good to go. This verification is required before the agent will take my form to the captain to get it signed.

Once universal access is implemented (not that I am holding my breath for it), where offliner employment is verifiable as an authorized 121.547 jumpseater, is when I think offliners (both pilots and dispatchers) will be permitted in airliner flight decks again.

My airline will take any 121 pilot, dispatcher, or A&P certified technician (they rightly are defined as a certified airman) as a cabin-riding jumpseater.
 

IFLYASA

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Seems like the 717 is much more fuel efficient than the DC-9. I read where Air Tran was saving 200$ per flight hour in fuel alone by flying the 717 as opposed to the DC-9. Looks like that pays for the crew!!
 

fletch717

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ASA,

The 717 fuel burn is approximately 30 percent less than the 9. that is why we have accelerated the retirement schedule of the
9's.

Fletch
 

IFLYASA

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That is wonderful. There is nothing wrong with a very fuel efficient airplane. It's nice to see you guys making money.

Just think of the profit margins on concourse "C" between the both of us!!
 

cpritchie5

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Jumpseat

Pilots are not the only ones that can jumpseat. Dispatchers and instructors can jumpseat only on their own airline because their identity can be verified electronically. By regulation, these individuals have to observe line operations periodically.. The Airlines are working with the TSA on universal access to allow reciprocating pilots back in other airlines jumpseats.
 

bssthound

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To clarify a couple earlier points: flight attendants can jumpseat, but only on the flight attendant jumpseat in the cabin. Only a qualified pilot, instructor, dispatcher, mechanic, or fed can ride the cockpit jumpseat(s).
Also, if in uniform while non-revving one cannot consume alcohol.
 

hyper

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"BASSET HOUNDS RULE"

HeeHee.....my Basset (Baxter) thinks so too!
 

skydiverdriver

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Actually,
Flight Attendants can jumpseat in the cockpit jumpseat, if their airline's operations manual allows it. I used to be a dispatcher at an airline that did allow this, and I put them on the jumpseat regularly. Actually, just about anyone can get approval from the Director of Operations, but those that are not certificated airmen must have a seat avaiable in the back. So, it doesn't help to get you on a full aircraft.
 
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