Jetblue circus revisited- 1st stuck in the lav, now the cargo hold

relief tube

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from what I know, if this minimum-wage joker had done this in the rear cargo hold and it was a long flight, he would have died.
............................

JetBlue worker nods off, flies to Boston in cargo hold - USAtoday.com

A 21-year-old JetBlue baggage handler flew between New York JFK and Boston after "mysteriously" getting trapped in the flight's cargo hold, various media outlets reported Monday. NBC New Yorksays it learned yesterday "that the worker was in the belly of the plane loading luggage for the flight that left JFK Airport around noon Saturday en route to Boston. That's when the worker seems to have fallen asleep. He later found himself in Beantown after the flight had landed at Logan International Airport," NBC writes.
The New York Daily Newsadds the man "stunned his tarmac counterparts at Boston's Logan Airport Saturday when they opened the cargo door of the twin-engine ERJ-190 jet and unloaded him along with the luggage." Police initially thought the man may have been a stowaway, but they eventually concluded he simply was "an accidental tourist," as the Daily Newsput its. Still, Massachusetts State Police spokesman David Procopio tells the paper that "even after talking to him we were a little uncertain as to how it happened."
NBC New York writes "one official said it appears the baggage handler fell asleep inside the cargo hold, but added that investigators are looking into whether the worker was accidentally locked inside by co-workers." Regardless, NBC adds that the official said the worker appeared to be "tired" and nodded off before the flight left JFK.
Then, the man "panicked when he realized he was no longer on the ground," The Boston Globewrites. The paper says he 'phoned JetBlue officials from the air but had to wait to be unloaded with the luggage at Gate 28 of Logan Airport, police said. A medical team evaluated him and found no signs of injuries." JetBlue officials say the company is investigating the incident.
JetBlue spokesman Bryan Baldwin "said the cargo bins on JetBlue planes are pressurized, which allowed (the man) to survive," the Daily Newswrites. The flight between JFK and Boston took 37 minutes and reached 17,000 feet, according to the paper, which adds that this isn’t the first such incident to happen at one of the New York-area airports. The Daily News writes that "in June 2005, a La Guardia Airport baggage handler took a nap in the empty cargo bin of a Spirit Airlines MD-80 and woke up 90 minutes later in Detroit."
 

freeflyer14

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The rear cargo bay is unpressurized and unheated, so he would have been pretty uncomfortable to say the least... It said they only went to 17,000 and the flight took 37 minutes (which I assume is block out to block in, flight time being considerably less). He probably would not have died (I've jumped from higher without 02, although admittedly was only up there for a relatively short time) but he would have been seriously cold!
 

wmuflyguy

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The rear cargo bay is unpressurized and unheated, so he would have been pretty uncomfortable to say the least... It said they only went to 17,000 and the flight took 37 minutes (which I assume is block out to block in, flight time being considerably less). He probably would not have died (I've jumped from higher without 02, although admittedly was only up there for a relatively short time) but he would have been seriously cold!
JFK to BOS is about 35 minutes, so the flight was probably an an hour and fifteen to and hour and half.

He'd most likely be fine (depending on what kind of shape he is in) at 17k for the 20 minutes of cruise flight that was probably spent at 17k. Just make sure not to light up a smoke or mess with a smoke detector in the cargo bin...that would be bad news.

You see rampers catching a little shuteye in there all the time, but it is generally before they load the bags for the outbound flight, not after. Apparently he found a nice cushy suitcase to sleep on.
 

poppi

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The cargo bay is pressurized. The only part not pressurized on the A320 is nose gear bay, air cond comp, main gear bay and tail cone.
 

CA1900

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Don't call it an ERJ; they get very touchy about it. :rolleyes:
 

BLUE BAYOU

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...And like no one has ever fallen asleep on the flight deck...I only have one question for the ramper-- does he still get paid for his shift? :laugh:
 

b707guy

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...and did his catnap rejuvenate him enough to be able to help unload the belly in BOS?
 

skidbuggy

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I wouldn't be surprised if he files some sort of lawsuit... gets promoted and the cockpit crew screwed.
 

Minimaniac

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The aft cargo bin of the E-190 IS pressurized, but unheated.
 

BLUE BAYOU

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"All exterior doors closed and locked, all crewmembers accounted for" will be the new required verbage...:nuts:
 

Redmeat

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I don't know what the big deal is...it has happened at Northwest and Spirit and will undoubtedly happen again. Zantop too, but the guy woke up and starting kicking the floor and the crew heard/felt it and came back.

The MO is always the same...ramper guy gets done loading and lays down in the bin waiting for last minute bags...wakes up in flight...

The NW guy stated he was 'trapped' behind bags to try and save his job.

The craziest thing is each time it has been short flights where heat has not been necessarily an issue.

Lucky dudes...
 

relief tube

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...And like no one has ever fallen asleep on the flight deck...
I haven't either. I'd hate to wake up and look down and see Pacific everywhere.
 

Mike man

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A few years ago in JFK we were just about to close the main cabin door for PVD (aft cargo already closed, bag and pax count in hand paperwork out the door)...when the gate agent ran back with a late pax, who had a gate check bag...so the rampers opened the aft cargo to toss the bag in and wouldn't ya know it...a ramper sleaping like a baby, so they pulled him out and off we went.
 

timeless

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I fell asleep in the belly of the Bae146 a couple of times. If I was working the pit during a quick turn I would just wait in the pit between unloading the inbound bags and loading the outbound bags. If I was tired and the bags didn't come right away I would doze off for a couple of minutes until they showed up. If the other guy was getting the carts there really wasn't anything else for me to do. The short nap was sort of a privilege earned by taking the more labor intensive position in the pit.
 

b707guy

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OK, guys, it's my leg, max power, standard calls and procedures ... climbing to FL 340 and at no point do I want to wake up and find the rest of you yahoos asleep!

So with all these belly entrapment occurrences, should aircraft manufacturers begin installing glow-in-the-dark emergency release handles like the one in my car's trunk?:rolleyes:
 
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