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It's how Europeans handle a drunk captain

SLUF4

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Doesn't appear that he was actually intoxicated

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/europe/article5651516.ece

It is normally a moment of cheery reassurance when an airline pilot greets passengers during preparations for take-off. But Alexander Cheplevsky sparked panic on flight Aeroflot 315 when he began to speak.
His slurred and garbled comments ahead of a flight from Moscow to New York convinced passengers that he was drunk. When he apparently switched from Russian into unintelligible English, fear turned to revolt.
Flight attendants initially ignored passengers' complaints and threatened to expel them from the Boeing 767 jet unless they stopped "making trouble". As the rebellion spread, Aeroflot representatives boarded the aircraft to try to calm down the 300 passengers.
One sought to reassure them by announcing that it was "not such a big deal" if the pilot was drunk because the aircraft practically flew itself.
Mr Cheplevsky did little to ease passengers' fears by refusing to leave the cockpit to show that he was sober. When he was finally persuaded to face them, witnesses said that he appeared unsteady on his feet and had bloodshot eyes.
"I don't think there's anyone in Russia who doesn't know what a drunk person looks like," Katya Kushner, one of the passengers, told the Moscow Times, which had a reporter travelling on the flight.
"At first, he was looking at us like we were crazy. Then, when we wouldn't back down, he said 'I'll sit here quietly in a corner. We have three more pilots. I won't even touch the controls, I promise'."
Aeroflot's bad day got worse when it emerged that the socialite and television host Ksenia Sobchak was on board. Ms Sobchak, one of Russia's best-known personalities, demanded that all four pilots be replaced.
The airline finally relented and summoned new pilots to fly the jet to New York three hours late. More than 100 passengers passed the time as they waited by signing a petition declaring that they believed Mr Cheplevsky had been drunk.
Ms Sobchak told Ekho Moskvy radio a few days later that she believed the pilot had been in no condition to fly. She said: "It took him three attempts to say the words 'duration of flight'. Even after Aeroflot personnel asked him to do so, he barely made it out of the cabin."
An Aeroflot spokeswoman said that tests had revealed no trace of alcohol in the pilot's blood. She blamed "mass psychosis" among passengers for the decision to replace the crew, although the company later issued a statement saying that Mr Cheplevsky could have suffered a stroke just before the flight.
The pilot told the newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda that he had been celebrating his 54th birthday with friends the night before the flight on December 28, but insisted that he not been drinking.
The row is a public relations setback for an airline that has worked hard to overcome its "Aeroflop" image. In the Soviet era, it was known for its unsmiling air hostesses, poor customer service and inedible food.
It came just months after an Aeroflot subsidiary was involved in Russia's worst air disaster for two years, when a jet crashed in the Urals city of Perm killing 88 passengers and crew. The airline banned subsidiaries from using its name and logo after the crash in September, saying it wanted to protect its safety record.
The newspaper Kommersant reported this week that investigators had found traces of alcohol in the blood of the captain who flew that jet. But they were unable to state whether it was the reason that he felt "sickly" shortly before surrendering the controls to another crew member as the plane was due to land.
 
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Whine Lover

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Of course, and that's why there are TWO pilots.

Geez, what a bunch of whiny babies those Russkies are.

Hell, I remember a (true) story where a Co-Pilot I know very well, a friend of mine, had to sit left seat to taxi the aircraft out to the runway because the Captain was too drunk to do it.

That airplane only had a first generation very rudimentary autopilot, never mind coupled approaches and gee whiz navigation with moving maps.

By God, I remember the days when the President of the Airline used to call the local Bar and demand that one of his Captains get his ass to the airport for an ad-hoc DC-8 trip to Europe, or all of them ( in the Bar ) would be fired. ( Another true story. )

Sh!t, you kids don't know what you're missin'....Why, we used to laugh at ice on the wings prior to departure. Grown men would weep at the sight of our huge balls....Wait, I'm getting a bit confused here, never mind that last part.


YKMKR
 
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Max Powers

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Of course, and that's why there are TWO pilots.

Geez, what a bunch of whiny babies those Russkies are.

Hell, I remember a (true) story where a Co-Pilot I know very well, a friend of mine, had to sit left seat to taxi the aircraft out to the runway because the Captain was too drunk to do it.

That airplane only had a first generation very rudimentary autopilot, never mind coupled approaches and gee whiz navigation with moving maps.

By God, I remember the days when the President of the Airline used to call the local Bar and demand that one of his Captains get his ass to the airport for an ad-hoc DC-8 trip to Europe, or all of them ( in the Bar ) would be fired. ( Another true story. )

Sh!t, you kids don't know what you're missin'....Why, we used to laugh at ice on the wings prior to departure. Grown men would weep at the sight of our huge balls....Wait, I'm getting a bit confused here, never mind that last part.


YKMKR

Yes and you went to and from school up hill.
 

Whine Lover

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It was a dark, and stormy night. The Sky was angry that day my Friends...

Okay...but, the rest....All true.

This business wasn't always about fags, and hags, and bullsh!t, and politics, and TSA, and mindless fools.

Once Upon A Time, There were Men.

I count my Lucky Stars that I was one of the last who got to see it... the way it was meant to be.


YKMKR

( P.S. - Seriously, I grew up in Maine...And, I can tell you ( numerous ) true stories of hiking home almost 3 miles, through the woods, in 4 foot deep snow, in the dark, after having served Detention. )
 
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Motown

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I always thought Russia was in Asia?

40% of Europe's land area is Russia.
The vast majority of the Russian polulation lives in Europe, but the Asian land area of Russia is much larger than the European land area.
 

Daedalus

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It is both Europe and Asia.

East of the Ural Mountains it is Europe, West of them it is Asia.

This ends your useless fact of the day.

Uh, you better get that whiskey compass of yours checked before you take off with it again. I guess doing geography in public is just as bad as doing math in public. :rolleyes:
 

Crzipilot

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Hell, I remember a (true) story where a Co-Pilot I know very well, a friend of mine, had to sit left seat to taxi the aircraft out to the runway because the Captain was too drunk to do it.

That airplane only had a first generation very rudimentary autopilot, never mind coupled approaches and gee whiz navigation with moving maps.

By God, I remember the days when the President of the Airline used to call the local Bar and demand that one of his Captains get his ass to the airport for an ad-hoc DC-8 trip to Europe, or all of them ( in the Bar ) would be fired. ( Another true story. )

Uhmmm...did we work at the same place???? I know of a DO that had to call the bar in Germany to uhmmm.....get in contact with some people....Kinda funny..... As well as those other instances...hmmm
 

Mike man

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It is both Europe and Asia.

East of the Ural Mountains it is Europe, West of them it is Asia.

This ends your useless fact of the day.

Like I said ace, "...thought..." was they key phrase in my statement...that ends you jack ass fact of the day.
 
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labbats

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Relax comrades! Are we not equals?!
 

Wesb737fo

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Doesn't appear that he was actually intoxicated ,,,,,,

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/europe/article5651516.ece
An Aeroflot spokeswoman said that tests had revealed no trace of alcohol in the pilot's blood. She blamed "mass psychosis" among passengers for the decision to replace the crew, although the company later issued a statement saying that Mr Cheplevsky could have suffered a stroke just before the flight.
,,,,,,.


I'm sure that made everyone feel better..
 

SLUF4

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No praise here, brotha. In fact I stated that it appeared he wasn't drunk according to the article.
 

ron burgundy

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He should have run into the lav,changed into civies and called in sick...ate a bad airport hot dog.
 

Raskal

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*sigh*
...The row is a public relations setback for an airline that has worked hard to overcome its "Aeroflop" image. In the Soviet era, it was known for its unsmiling air hostesses, poor customer service and inedible food...

Uh, ummm, what does that have to do with the Soviet Union? I thought that description was born right here.
 

wmuflyguy

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May be it was just a mass hysteria.

Like this?

http://avherald.com/h?article=40f459c8&opt=0

Incident: Aeroflot A320 at Krasnojarsk on Nov 1st 2008, deicing prompts evacuation
By Simon Hradecky, created Saturday, Nov 1st 2008 11:28Z, last updated Monday, Nov 3rd 2008 23:49Z
An Aeroflot Airbus A320-200, flight SU780 from Krasnojarsk to Moscow Sheremetyevo (Russia) with reportedly 200 (??) passengers, was evacuated while deicing for takeoff was in progress. A passenger looking out of his window saw white clouds of smoke, thought the plane was on fire, panicked and thus created panic with the other passengers, too. The crew decided to give way to the resulting stampede, alerted the tower and initiated the evacuation.

The white smoke clouds were in fact steam from the deicing fluid.

Aeroflot said the following day, that the air conditioning of the airplane should have been turned off during the de-icing procedure, but was running. Some de-icing fluid entered the vents and evaporated, producing some haze in the cabin, which obviously helped the panic.

A replacement Airbus reached Moscow with 141 passengers and a delay of 14 hours at 10pm Moscow time.

A passenger on board, who wants to remain unnamed, reported on Monday (Nov 3rd), that the airplane was sitting at the gate unusually long after doors were closed, then the airplane was pushed back, pulled in, and pushed back again a couple of times. Then the engines were started and the airplane taxied towards the runway. Immediately before the runway a deicing truck was waiting for the airplane, the airplane stopped. Shortly thereafter white clouds like smoke, steam or fog appeared inside the cabin from the back crawling just under the cabin ceiling and quickly filled the entire cabin. No smell was noticeable, definitely no smell like smoke, deicing fluid, alcohol or steam. While the haze distributed throughout the cabin, people were still quietly sitting buckled into their seats. Then a loud command was shouted from the back, prompting all passengers to unbuckle and raise from their seats, both doors in the back were opened, slides deployed to both right and left of the aircraft and the evacuation started. The overwing exits were opened by the according passengers, too.

While passengers were jumping down the slides, a S7 aircraft taxied along the Airbus and began its takeoff roll.

Fire engines arrived after a few minutes but didn't really jump to action. Some long time later 2 busses arrived and took the passengers to the airport terminal, where passengers had to pick up their luggage and send through screening again. Several passengers decided to not continue their journey and returned to Krasnojarsk.

Rumour amongst the passengers while waiting for the replacement aircraft in the departure lounge had it, that there was a fire in the rear galley. The source of the rumour however is unknown.
 
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