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Is Delta Connection Academy A Good School?

eagle1983

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Can anyone tell me that has been there there what they know about Delta Connection Academy and what are the pro's and cons of going there. I attended Spartan in Tulsa, OK and was not impressed with there operation.
 

StrykerFL

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Warning, Warning!!

Stay Away!! Stay very far AWAY!!!

Just do a search on delta connection academy or comair aviation academy and that shold definately answer your question. Or you could just give me 100K and I'll kick you in the nuts.
 
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flyguy81

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Dec 22, 2004
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go to college, get a 4 yr degree and get rating while you go to school....will cost you the same and noone will hate you
 

cforst513

Giggity giggity goo!!!
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besides doing a search for delta connection academy and comair academy, look up DCA. you will find the general feeling is negative. but i encourage you to search the site, you'll find lots of info.
 

joepilot29

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Being a former DCA student. I would say stay away. The whole key to the DCA bs media scam is getting hired as a flight instructor first before getting that coveted "airline interview". When I interviewed with DCA there were 150 CFI students. I didn't get hired and it's has been a blessing in disguise. They went from interviewing about 6 people a month to 6 people a week. I think if you had jaywalking on your record you didn't get hired.

I have been lucky. I am ahead of most of my origional classmates as far as hours. In hindsight I would not have gone there. I would have gone the FBO route. My loan payments are about $600 a month. The airplanes are crap and it has gotten way over priced. But the training is some of the best. Just make sure you do your homework before you commit. You can get a job without going to DCA. They brainwash you into thinking they are the only way to get a job from day one.
 

cforst513

Giggity giggity goo!!!
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might i make a suggestion? go to www.epicaviation.com . it's a great school, all new airplanes (oldest is a 2000) and we take the delivery of our first all-glass 172 this week :) and we have one diesel/jetA 172 right now, and will be outfitting another airplane shortly. PM me with any questions
 

moxiepilot

Florida Pimp
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dca is no better than spartan, just a few less chinese students running around
 

ppolstra

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Go with a local school

Find a decent local school. You will spend less, and get better training if you do your homework right.
 

aeronautic1

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Sep 9, 2003
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Look!!

Professional Flight Training at KFXE is one of the finest mom and pop flight schools you can ever find. A large fleet (13) of Warrior & Duchess aircraft. Founded by retired Eastern captain and his flight attendant wife and run by daughter and son in-law. The aircraft are 9's-10's inside and out. Many times flight instructors from Flyers, GIA ets have jumped the fence to teach for this company. I took PPL thru ATP with them when I had the choice to go elsewhere.
954-938-3043 for info.
 

Fly_Chick

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At DCA (in their part 141) you will only fly four types of planes, C152, C172, Arrow and Seminole. You will follow their exact syllabus, even as an instructor. You will never give a Flight Review, and IPC, or even an aircraft check-out. You will not land on a grass strip.

You will learn to do everything exactly by the book (their book). You will learn to memorize everything, checklists, emergency procedures, standards.

You will only fly to approved airports, using approved routes.

My recommendation is to go to your local FBO. You will have more variety in the planes you fly. You will have more opportunity to fly with different people from different aviation backgrounds. You will learn to be graceful in your flying, learn to apply your decision making to the circumstance at hand, adapt to new environments and challenges. You will learn to work with people from all aspects of aviation (new 16 yr. old private student to 65 yr old retired Eastern Airlines pilot wanting a Flight Review).

You will be able to fly to almost any airport of your choosing, make your own decisions. I met a flight instructor from DCA who deviated to the airport that I fly out of, and he told me he had to write a report when he got back as to why he deviated since he landed at an airport not on the approved airport list. That same weekend, I flew to an airport of my choosing, got weathered in, called to tell the owner the plane would not be on the ramp the next day as we were staying the night in FLL due to weather. The owner's reply, "Thanks for calling. See you tomorrow. Have a good night."
 
Last edited:

cynic

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Apr 7, 2004
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why those schools suck

Education Theory 101....

You don't hire former students.

If I teach you everything I know you get a subset of what I know. Then you teach the next student everything you know and he gets a subset of what you know, which is a subset of what I know… well I think you get the idea.

Several generations of inbreeding later you have a pilot that can identify a VOR and recite the regulations on a minimum equipment list but can’t do a cross wind landing.

Flame retardant….

Not all DCA or riddle pilots are bad, and you can get rotten instruction via FBOs part 61…

But variety in education is good, not bad. That’s why when you get a PhD, the university that gave you the degree will not hire you!
 

DAS at 10/250

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I have to agree with cynic. This is the same reason that most reputable masters programs will only accept outside applicants.
 

Photoflight

AIR rAMBO
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If your still in Oklahoma, Southeastern Oklahoma State is just down the road from Tulsa. PM me with any questions.
 

Flyguy6

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Fly_Chick said:
At DCA (in their part 141) you will only fly four types of planes, C152, C172, Arrow and Seminole. You will follow their exact syllabus, even as an instructor. You will never give a Flight Review, and IPC, or even an aircraft check-out. You will not land on a grass strip.

You will learn to do everything exactly by the book (their book). You will learn to memorize everything, checklists, emergency procedures, standards.

You will only fly to approved airports, using approved routes.

My recommendation is to go to your local FBO. You will have more variety in the planes you fly. You will have more opportunity to fly with different people from different aviation backgrounds. You will learn to be graceful in your flying, learn to apply your decision making to the circumstance at hand, adapt to new environments and challenges. You will learn to work with people from all aspects of aviation (new 16 yr. old private student to 65 yr old retired Eastern Airlines pilot wanting a Flight Review).

You will be able to fly to almost any airport of your choosing, make your own decisions. I met a flight instructor from DCA who deviated to the airport that I fly out of, and he told me he had to write a report when he got back as to why he deviated since he landed at an airport not on the approved airport list. That same weekend, I flew to an airport of my choosing, got weathered in, called to tell the owner the plane would not be on the ramp the next day as we were staying the night in FLL due to weather. The owner's reply, "Thanks for calling. See you tomorrow. Have a good night."

But isnt that the whole point? Getting you ready to fly for an airline. When you fly for an airline, you will fly according to that company's policy. you will fly the airspeeds. approaches, to the airports that that company tells you to. So, in a sence, youare flyig a mini airline. Doesnt that prepare you more than just doing what you want to do so when you actually get to a paret 121 operatron, youare not shocked? A

So are you guys saying that DCA is on the same level as Tab? I used to be a ramp agent at ASA and a lot of the pilots I worked with graduated from DCA and they seemed to like it
 

Fly_Chick

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Flyguy6 said:
But isnt that the whole point? Getting you ready to fly for an airline. When you fly for an airline, you will fly according to that company's policy. you will fly the airspeeds. approaches, to the airports that that company tells you to. So, in a sence, youare flyig a mini airline. Doesnt that prepare you more than just doing what you want to do so when you actually get to a paret 121 operatron, youare not shocked? A

So are you guys saying that DCA is on the same level as Tab? I used to be a ramp agent at ASA and a lot of the pilots I worked with graduated from DCA and they seemed to like it

Yes, the point is to get you ready for an airline. Yes, follow things by company policy yet also the pilot should be able to make decisions based on what is happening around him/her. Change your airspeed on an approach if wx conditions warrant, use flaps discriminately at the FAF if you determine you may encounter icing.

Keep in mind, the local FBOs have procedures, instructors have procedures for their students, manufacturers have procedures (checklists in the POH). You will be just as prepared going to the airlines from an FBO training background as long as you have good, committed instructors, and are willing to commit yourself to your goals.
 

huncowboy

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enough
I am soon to finish my 800 dual given. It worked for me so far. I did spend less than 50k at a satellite base. Pretty much all my friends and former CFIs are hired somewhere, mostly Comair, and CHQ. None of them have a 100k loan. I have like 20k the rest was out of pocket. I could have saved about 15k through an FBO. That case I would have to instruct for an additional 700 hours which is another year and a half just to get an interview with some luck or some connections. Living as a CFI is a financial disaster. The length of it is part of your overall cost. The longer = the more. Those who do take 100k or more out, do so to cover cost of living, not for flight training. You got to be a real peace to spend 100k on dual received.

All the transfer students I have seen from FBOs after their private, or instrument were deeply below standards. Mostly their ground knowledge was bad and some of these guys are real sharp. Flying wise they were as able as anyone else except for their procedures to which I referr to as free style. I know about some good FBOs, they usually don't lose their students but those aren't that cheap since they are 141. They still won't fly brand new 172s with glass for half the price either. They can't give you job placement. You won't be instructed by several different CFIs, and evaluated by several others. You will not go through airline oriented sim and p 121 training which is tailored for your target airline. So you do pay that extra for something more than empty marketing. You pay it for training and for service. If you aren't an idiot you won't pay 2x over an FBO. I haven't seen an FBO that does 0 to MEI for 25k lately. Good ones will go 30-40ish or more. (I can only talk about S FL btw.)
IMO what I have paid over an FBO was worth it. If I won't get a job at the end it will be my fault only. DCA gives you more than one interview if you fail the first or even second. They don't guarantee this though.

It was on me whether I got hired or not at DCA. If they think that they can get along with you, and as long you weren't a complete training disaster and you aren't bipolar you will be hired. Once I was hired as a CFI it was, again, all up to me. Very simple. The dude that signs your paycheck tells you how to do it, then you do it the way he told you to. This has worked for me in my former life. Some people can't do this without a riot. I don't want you over at my BBQ.

There are other schools who also place students to airlines, if that is what you want, make an educated decision. If you go with an FBO I would ask them for some references, and check if they hire their own students, and check how busy and stable they are. You will be surprised but even FBOs don't always hire all of their own students, Just because XY was able to pay for your program, it doesn't mean that you would want to work with that person. You will also be surprised that many students don't make it at FBOs because good schools will have higher standards which they will not sacrifice for customer service issues.

I am off the mike... getting tired... sorry for the not too well organized thoughts...
 

DAS at 10/250

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That case I would have to instruct for an additional 700 hours which is another year and a half just to get an interview with some luck or some connections.

Sorry, but I just couldn't let this statement slide by.


You don't need DCA, ATP, GIA, TAB, ERAU, or any other acronym school to get an interview. You need 600/100.

I attended Comair Academy for my instrument rating with plans of staying there and finishing the whole program. I saw the school for the scam it was and left. You didn't see it that way and that is fine, you and I will agree to disagree.

But for the beginners out there who still have that "I want to be an airline pilot" glimmer in their eye, do your research. Yes these schools provide good training but you don't need them to get you to your goal.

I'm a non-academy grad (GASP!) and am flying a B100. I also interviewed with ExpressJet and turned the job down. No insider, no daddy, no nothing. Applied and got called.

I also turned down the Colgan interview (I still don't know who gave them my resume).

My buddy, PeterGibbons, a non-academy grad is flying the LR31 for AirNet.

My other buddy, a non-academy grad is flying a Hawker 800XP and Citation 7.

My other other buddy, a non-academy grad is flying the sweetest 421 for fifth year regional CAPT pay.

My other other other buddy, a non-academy grad is flying the B350.

My other other other other buddy, a non-academy grad is with Chautauqua.

My other other other other other buddy, a non-academy grad is a Mesa CRJ Capt.

All these guys and myself were PT 61 FBO instructors. Also, if you need a year and a half to get 700 hours you need to get up before noon.

For all you beginners there are two truths that will never change.
1. Everybody uses the same PTS.

2. Nobody at any level past flight training cares where you got your ratings.

Good luck.
 

standaman

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Not for everyone

Having been a student and a flight instructor at DCA I can tell you it is not for everyone. The program is expensive and very rigorous. In all fairness it did help me to get to Comair Airlines where I am a first officer now. For those of you out there who think it is nothing but a scam (and I see alot of them on this thread). I know alot of friends who have gone through the program and are for the most part happy at the regional that they are. Take a look at the placement of people on the Delta Connection Academy website. That is not made up. So you may disagree with how they do things or advertise and believe me I am one of those people. I can presonally tell you about all the hoops and hurdles you will have to navigate through to get where you want to be. How well you do is all on you. No you do not need to go to DCA to get a job. But in my opinion the connections are good. When all is said and done flight training is flight training I am no better a pilot than anybody else from any other flight school. Flight training is all about what atmosphere and amenaties you get. Choose the flight school that suites you. That simple
 
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