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Icao Atp

Buford

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Nov 30, 2001
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I was filling out an online application for a non US carrier and came across a couple of things that confused me. What exactly is the difference between an ATP vs. ATPL? And what is a frozen ATP? And finally, when an application asks for an ICAO ATP, I assume the US (FAA) ATP doesn't qualify?

Thanks in advance.
 

Ex1900Driver

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Jan 24, 2002
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Hey... as for the difference between ATP and ATPL I believe they are the same thing.
A frozen ATPL is the point at which you have your Commercial and Instrument rating as well as having passed the ATP written examination but do not have the requisite number of hours to get the ATP license. So they issue you a frozen ATP until you have the requirements.
I have included a couple of links that might interest you.

http://www.caa.co.uk/

http://www.jaa.nl/

Hopefully I got the basic dea across but any other input from folks with more knowledge about this couldn't hurt

GDC
 

bobbysamd

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Nov 26, 2001
Posts
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U.S. ATP v. ICAO ATP

The USA is a member of the International Civil Aviation Organization and a signatory to its various treaties. Your U.S. ATP is regarded as an ICAO ATP. Some countries don't refer to your "ticket" as a "certificate" as we do; they call it a "license."

Now, a lot depends on if the carrier in question will accept your ATP. It seems to vary from country to country. I understand that European (JAA) licenses seem to be acceptable in all countries in Europe and in other parts of the world as well. Although you might hold a perfectly valid U.S. ATP, it might not be acceptable in a particular country and you will have to obtain the local ATPL. You'll get credit for your flight time, but you'll have to take the local written(s) and, very possibly, a flight test.

I found this page, which gives a little background:

http://www.icao.int/icao/en/anb/peltrg/peltrg/annex1.html

Hope this helps a little more.
 
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