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How far would you go for jet time?

HMR

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I was just reading the "day in the life" article in the new issue of AIN. I almost spit out my gum when I read the part about this guy. Background: He shows up at Clay Lacy in VNY for a 9am flight in his Lear25 only to find out it's been rescheduled to 6pm.

"With more than 8 hours until the next flight, (name removed) might be expected to return home, except that home is in Prescott, Ariz. A 1990 graduate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University there, he worked as a flight instructor until five months ago, when Clay Lacy hired him to fly the Learjet right seat. Now he thinks in Mach numbers and flight levels rather than in knots and feet.
(Name removed) drives the 12-hour round-trip commute from Prescott to Van Nuys about three times a month."

WOW!
How much does Lacy pay to fly right seat in a Lear 25? (Not much)
Have you ever poked your head into one of Lacy's Lear 25's? (Not good)
Is the job market really this bad?

This should make the cover of Pro Pilot soon.
 

Ace-of-the-Base

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HMR said:
I was just reading the "day in the life" article in the new issue of AIN. I almost spit out my gum when I read the part about this guy. Background: He shows up at Clay Lacy in VNY for a 9am flight in his Lear25 only to find out it's been rescheduled to 6pm.

"With more than 8 hours until the next flight, (name removed) might be expected to return home, except that home is in Prescott, Ariz. A 1990 graduate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University there, he worked as a flight instructor until five months ago, when Clay Lacy hired him to fly the Learjet right seat. Now he thinks in Mach numbers and flight levels rather than in knots and feet.
(Name removed) drives the 12-hour round-trip commute from Prescott to Van Nuys about three times a month."

WOW!
How much does Lacy pay to fly right seat in a Lear 25? (Not much)
Have you ever poked your head into one of Lacy's Lear 25's? (Not good)
Is the job market really this bad?

This should make the cover of Pro Pilot soon.
Isn't 9 just 6 upside down?

Details, details.

Ace
 

1973Arrow

Word
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Enough
If I knew who that was I'd send him some knee pads and maybe a bigg bottle of KY.
 

banned username 2

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HMR said:
A 1990 graduate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University there, he worked as a flight instructor until five months ago, when Clay Lacy hired him to fly the Learjet right seat. Now he thinks in Mach numbers and flight levels rather than in knots and feet.
Geez... I graduated with this guy... WTF has he been doing for the past 15 years??? I looked up his name in the AIN article, I don't think I know him...
 

smellthejeta

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If he only does it three times per month, I'm curious as to why he just doesn't fly WN from PHX to BUR. No matter how long that takes him, it has *got* to be better than driving.
 

Checks

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No duty day issues there!

Someone send that article to the FSDO, 91.13
 

hawkerjet

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the answer for me is 3100 hours TT. since i received my commercial cert. i was trying to get into a jet. along the way, i flew cabin class twins in the midwest, and rockies, turbo props in the california sierra's and finally got my jet job when i had 3100TT with 2200 multi with all that multi pic.
PS. as you might have surmised, i did not PFT.
 

CorpLearDriver

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Well, all I can say is, Prescott beats living around Van Nuys on what he's being paid any day. I'm sure he has his reasons and not wanting to move the family is probably one of them. Either way, it is his choice and I have known several pilots in this industry over the years to make the same decision.
 
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banned username 2

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CorpLearDriver said:
Well, all I can say is, Prescott beats living around Van Nuys on what he's being paid any day. I'm sure he has his reasons and not wanting to move the family is probably one of them. Either way, it is his choice and I have known several pilots in this industry over the years to make the same decision.
I agree Prescott was a great place to live (well I loved it anyhow, the way it was 15-20 years ago)... I just can't imagine working as a CFI at Riddle for 15 years after graduation... Hey, to each their own... But in the eyes of future employers, they gotta wonder why he didn't try to advance himself...
 
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CorpLearDriver

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Falcon Capt said:
I agree Prescott was a great place to live (well I loved it anyhow, the way it was 15-20 years ago)... I just can't imagine working as a CFI at Riddle for 15 years after graduation... Hey, to each their own... But in the eyes of future employers, they gotta wonder why he didn't try to advance himself...
I wouldn't. Timing, responsibilities at the time, a lot of things could factor in. Some people just have different priorities in life and like you said, to each his own. I was with one company for over 14 years that most pilots used as a jumping off point to move on to other jobs. Then I went through a couple of fairly quick job changes and now I find myself wandering all over the world. Each person's career course is their own. We should not judge them by where we are or what we would have done.

I once knew a CFI/Examiner out of Fullerton, CA, Travis Flanery, that had some 30,000+ hours, most of which was instruction given. He had tried other jobs but always came back to instructing because that was what he enjoyed the most. And he was in a community at the airport that loved him until the day he died.
 
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eljefe

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CorpLearDriver said:
II once knew a CFI/Examiner out of Fullerton, CA, Travis Flanery, that had some 30,000+ hours, most of which was instruction given. He had tried other jobs but always came back to instructing because that was what he enjoyed the most. And he was in a community at the airport that loved him until the day he died.
Reading that made me smile. I knew a guy like that too....at Daniel Field in August, GA. When I knew him in the 60's he had 25,000+ hours of dual given. The guy was amazing.

He obviously found his niche and aviation was the better for it.
 

CorpLearDriver

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eljefe said:
He obviously found his niche and aviation was the better for it.
We should all hope to be so blessed.
 

banned username 2

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CorpLearDriver said:
I wouldn't. Timing, responsibilities at the time, a lot of things could factor in. Some people just have different priorities in life and like you said, to each his own. I was with one company for over 14 years that most pilots used as a jumping off point to move on to other jobs. Then I went through a couple of fairly quick job changes and now I find myself wandering all over the world. Each person's career course is their own. We should not judge them by where we are or what we would have done.

I once knew a CFI/Examiner out of Fullerton, CA, Travis Flanery, that had some 30,000+ hours, most of which was instruction given. He had tried other jobs but always came back to instructing because that was what he enjoyed the most. And he was in a community at the airport that loved him until the day he died.
That's exactly why I said "To each their own..." But it appears that CFIing wasn't his dream, as he is now working for Clay Lacy (voluntarily), but then again, changing jobs is rough, and sometimes people get into that "comfort factor" that is hard to give up... I went back to campus 7 years after graduation (right after I started my current job) and found out my RA was still working their as a CFI... I think he has since moved on...

Like I said in another thread, if I could find that secure, 2 day a week, King Air 300 job in Iowa paying $175k a year, I'd be all over that in a heartbeat as well. I know quite a few people who would think I was nuts to do that... I'm not holding my breath on finding that one, so until then, I'll stick to flying the G-V, because it pays the bills...
 

CorpLearDriver

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Falcon Capt said:
That's exactly why I said "To each their own..." But it appears that CFIing wasn't his dream, as he is now working for Clay Lacy (voluntarily), but then again, changing jobs is rough, and sometimes people get into that "comfort factor" that is hard to give up... I went back to campus 7 years after graduation (right after I started my current job) and found out my RA was still working their as a CFI... I think he has since moved on...

Like I said in another thread, if I could find that secure, 2 day a week, King Air 300 job in Iowa paying $175k a year, I'd be all over that in a heartbeat as well. I know quite a few people who would think I was nuts to do that... I'm not holding my breath on finding that one, so until then, I'll stick to flying the G-V, because it pays the bills...
Well, hopefully one day that job will come along for ya'.
 

HMR

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Falcon Capt said:
But in the eyes of future employers, they gotta wonder why he didn't try to advance himself...
Good point.
There's a career progression that's considered "normal". Being a CFI for 15 years then jumping into the right seat of a Lear 25 isn't normal. Neither is flying around the pattern in a 172 for 30,000hrs. I know guys like this. They aren't loveable experts about aviation; they're weird. Every 5,000+hr "Chief Instructor" I've ever worked under or known has had some social problem that's caused them to be stuck in an entry level position.
 

CorpLearDriver

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HMR said:
Good point.
There's a career progression that's considered "normal". Being a CFI for 15 years then jumping into the right seat of a Lear 25 isn't normal. Neither is flying around the pattern in a 172 for 30,000hrs. I know guys like this. They aren't loveable experts about aviation; they're weird. Every 5,000+hr "Chief Instructor" I've ever worked under or known has had some social problem that's caused them to be stuck in an entry level position.
This guy may well be as you say "weird." But unless you know him personally, you can't say it is a certainty. And as far as people flying around in Cessnas for 30,000 hours, in the 70's when I learned to fly, there were a lot of folks that fit that mould. It may seem odd now, but it wasn't then. Deregulation of the airlines hadn't taken place yet and movement in the pilot ranks was dead slow if not non-existant. So instructing paid the bills.
 

Ace-of-the-Base

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HMR said:
Good point.
There's a career progression that's considered "normal". Being a CFI for 15 years then jumping into the right seat of a Lear 25 isn't normal. Neither is flying around the pattern in a 172 for 30,000hrs. I know guys like this. They aren't loveable experts about aviation; they're weird. Every 5,000+hr "Chief Instructor" I've ever worked under or known has had some social problem that's caused them to be stuck in an entry level position.
Oh no. Now you're sounding like me. You're gonna get your a$$ chewed for that one. Just remember, leave English alone, she's under my protection.

Ace
 

XTW

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1973Arrow said:
If I knew who that was I'd send him some knee pads and maybe a bigg bottle of KY.

What makes this quote the best, is that when combined with the poster's avatar, it makes you say, "Hmm".
 

aeronautic1

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HMR said:
I was just reading the "day in the life" article in the new issue of AIN. I almost spit out my gum when I read the part about this guy. Background: He shows up at Clay Lacy in VNY for a 9am flight in his Lear25 only to find out it's been rescheduled to 6pm.

"With more than 8 hours until the next flight, (name removed) might be expected to return home, except that home is in Prescott, Ariz. A 1990 graduate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University there, he worked as a flight instructor until five months ago, when Clay Lacy hired him to fly the Learjet right seat. Now he thinks in Mach numbers and flight levels rather than in knots and feet.
(Name removed) drives the 12-hour round-trip commute from Prescott to Van Nuys about three times a month."

WOW!
How much does Lacy pay to fly right seat in a Lear 25? (Not much)
Have you ever poked your head into one of Lacy's Lear 25's? (Not good)
Is the job market really this bad?

This should make the cover of Pro Pilot soon.
ERAU Grad... enough said!!
 
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