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Helicopter School?

BSeals71

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Hey Guys,



I don’t want to sound like I’m just playing around. (wont mention any names from previous threads). But I am really interested in learning how to fly helicopters.

I’ve even considered joining the Guard or Reserve.

I’m also willing to pay for civilian training.

Just hire at a regional airline and don’t want to give up flying the CRJ-200.

I’m based and new to the Dayton, Ohio area and looking for a place to learn

how to fly helicopters. What flight school would you recommend?

Or somewhere near the Dayton area?

If there isn’t a place around, how realistic is it to fly every so often (say once or twice a week on my days off) and still not have to repeat lessons over again. I know how this can be coming form a CFI. If I did, I would have to fly or drive a ways from Dayton to the airport. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.



Thanks
 

avbug

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You're going to have to repeat lessons and recapture learning no matter how you slice it, even if you're taking instruction frequently. If you're flying on an ad-hoc occasional basis, you'll certainly end up needing more instruction and training. That's not a bad thing, though it will take you longer and be more expensive in the long run.

If you can get into a flight training program in the military, for what it's worth, take the opportunity and go with it. You can't buy that kind of training or the opportunity, and there's a lot of competition to get it.
 

whirlybird

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How old are you and do you have any college? The Army loves to see people with prior avaiton background applying for the WOFT(Warrant Officer Flight Training) program. I know several people here at Ft Rucker that got picked up by a Guard or Reserve unit straight from the street to fly.
 
Last edited:

BSeals71

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whirlybird said:
How old are you and do you have any college? The Army loves to see people with prior avaiton background applying for the WOFT(Warrant Officer Flight Training) program. I know several people here at Ft Rucker that got picked up by a Guard or Reserve unit straight from the street to fly.

I’m 21 and have about a year left to finish up my 4-year degree. The army doesn’t sound that bad. I want to complete my degree before I join. Is there a way apply to the WOFT and know for sure that I will stay part-time? What's the best way? I just don’t want to join and find out that I have to give up my airline job. Would you recommend any books to help prepare for transitioning into the military and for the test?

Thanks.



P.S

Did you go threw the WOFT?
 

Traderd

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BSeals71 said:
I’m 21 and have about a year left to finish up my 4-year degree. The army doesn’t sound that bad. I want to complete my degree before I join. Is there a way apply to the WOFT and know for sure that I will stay part-time? What's the best way? I just don’t want to join and find out that I have to give up my airline job. Would you recommend any books to help prepare for transitioning into the military and for the test?

Thanks.



P.S

Did you go threw the WOFT?
Your question has a lot of facets and I'll try to give some insight, if I may. There are many on this board that have been through the selection and training process more recently than I and I'm sure they'll chime in with some excellent advice. You will do well to listen to those who have gone before. The information you receive from the recruiter may or may not be complete and in your best interest.

If you want to serve as a Warrant Officer Aviator, then WOFT is the vehicle. If you would rather serve as an RLO (1LT etc), then first comes the commission (via ROTC, OCS, etc) then flight school.

If you are a member of a Guard or Reserve unit, and they sponsor you (for the lack of a better word) then you will proceed to Mother Rucker, complete aviation training (WOFT or otherwise) and return to serve in the unit. You can enlist under the delayed enlistment program and probably have time to complete your degree.

Stay part time? Depends on how you define part time. I don't know how things are shaking out right now but extended tours to points of interest have been the norm. So out of your 5 year (?) commitment, you may be part time all but 18 months of it. As far as keeping your airline job, I would guess you have the same protection during deployment/training as any other soldier/employee. It has been my experience that individuals employed with airlines have had excellent results with time off for duty. Your results, of course, may vary.

And don't forget the stop loss. I served a bit more (8 months) than my 20 years for retirement thanks to that little item. Kind of gives a new meaning to part time volunteer.

And lastly, joining the Army to become an aviator is not about flying helicopters. It is about becoming a soldier and an officer. Your OER will not reflect on your skills as a pilot, but on your potential to serve as a leader. If your primary interest is in manipulating the controls of a rotary wing aircraft, you may want to save yourself a lot of headaches and stick with civilian flying. Not to say that Army doesn't involve flying, it certainly does. I don't consider any of the move my ass around in my airplane under IFR "flying" after my years in Army Aviation. But the truth is the Army can well be one part flying to ten parts BS and you must be prepared for this. Some of the guys I flew with never quite adjusted and were not the happiest of campers. Remember that you are not in the cockpit 24/7, but you are a soldier for that duration.

And of course, If you ain't Cav - you ain't sh$t!

Good luck to you in whatever you may choose.
 

whirlybird

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Yes I am the woft program right now.
Traderd is right due to current operations overseas the guard has been deploying as often as their active duty counterpart, in that instance you would not be part time but keep in mind this will not last forever. And from what I understand your employer cannot fire you for being in the guard.
Your first step in this process would be to contact your local guard units. You are also going to have to take the ASVAB and AFAST tests, you can find these books at almost any book store. ARCO makes a good book for the AFAST and for other services tests called the Military Flight Apptitude Tests. Just remember this, if you want to fly your whole career in the Army you want to go Warrant you will get plenty of hours trust me.
 
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