Followup on Missed Approach Procedures

your_dreamguy

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A few days ago I made a post about using heading vs. track when doing missed approaches and takeoffs into strong crosswinds.
Could we please look at West Palm Beach (KPBI) ILS 27R? The missed approach states, climb to 520 (I think) and turn to .... etc. etc. It doesn't mention anything about flying a specific heading such as runway heading, etc. Therefore, I would perform the missed in the following manner. I would TRACK runway heading to 520 and then turn as assigned. TRACK meaning, I would use my magenta ground track indicator to track a heading of 276 deg or use the Localizer Back Course indicator to make sure my ground track matched the extended runway centerline for RWY 27R to 520'. This would be as oppossed to flying the runway heading to 520.' In light wind conditions, differing techniques wouldn't matter. However, in a strong crosswind, the differing techniques would matter. Is this the way everyone else would perform the missed as well?
 

Amish RakeFight

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You're supposed to fly runway heading without the wind correction. This is burried somewhere in the regs./AIM.

The MAP for PBI ILS 27R:

Climb to 500' RH 276 degrees
Climb to 2000'
Right turn to join PBI 343 radial
 

Amish RakeFight

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Not all AC have fancy "magenta" ground tracks, BTW.

Hope this makes it easier to understand or puts it in better perspective.
 

Amish RakeFight

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Found this in the FAA Instrument Procedures Handbook:​


Additionally, when required, departure instructions specify the actual heading to be flown after takeoff, as is the case in figure 2-34 under the departure route description, “Climb via heading 112 degrees...” Some existing procedures specify, “Climb runway heading.” Over time, both of these departure instructions will be updated to read, “Climb heading 112 degrees....” Runway Heading is the magnetic direction that corresponds with the runway centerline

extended (charted on the AIRPORT DIAGRAM), not the numbers painted on the runway. Pilots cleared to “fly or maintain runway heading” are expected to fly or maintain the published heading that corresponds with the extended centerline of the departure runway (until otherwise instructed by ATC), and are not to apply drift correction; e.g. RWY 11, actual magnetic heading of the runway centerline 112.2 degrees, “fly heading 112 degrees”. In the event of parallel departures this prevents a loss of separation caused by only one aircraft applying a wind drift.​
 
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