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Flexjet has a new App!!!

NJAowner

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"Flexjet launches the most advanced mobile app for fractional owners"

"Flexjet has an industry leading disruptive new mobile owner's app"

"Flexjet to elevate owner's experience with new app"

This is absolutely amazing. Though most owners I know prefer to be "elevated" by having the jet arrive on time and as scheduled or more importantly to quickly and seamlessly get the owner elevated into the air on a recovery aircraft. I knew they were on the "cutting edge" - just not sure what they have been cutting. Most Flexjet owners I know (who were owners before the transition) are not happy - but maybe the new app will help them change their minds.
 

Imissmypilot

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NJAOwner, I wonder if your friends will be a all insulted by the premise they can be distracted away from the real issues of this company by the bright shiny glittering toy Uncle is trying to put in front of them.

BTW, apps are hackable. And without going into specifics, there are some serious new attempts being made every day in our sector that compromise safety and security. If you want my personal opinion, our owners are valuable targets to these unscrupulous people. I would petition to make sure my data, including the data of everyone and everything involved in my transportion stayed far away from such a hackable platform. In other words, if I was an owner I'd tell the company HELL NO.
 

NJAowner

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The ones I know aren't distracted. They are fed up with recovery and scheduling. A major reason many fly fractional is to get there quickly when we want to get there. Not to have our provider delay us and make lots of excuses and gets us there many hours later.
 

GlorifiedCabbie

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The professional pilots here can only do so much safely. Our days are stretched and they are getting as much work out of us as they can. You have to call in and let them know that if they don't give you a break, you will call fatigue. It's the pilots that don't let the dispatchers know that they are getting tired that worry me. Seems like a lot of these guys are nodding off.
 

Imissmypilot

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The professional pilots here can only do so much safely. Our days are stretched and they are getting as much work out of us as they can. You have to call in and let them know that if they don't give you a break, you will call fatigue. It's the pilots that don't let the dispatchers know that they are getting tired that worry me. Seems like a lot of these guys are nodding off.

GC I rarely disagree with you but here I disagree wholeheartedly. There is no such thing as anticipated fatigue. There is fine and there is fatigued. If you "think" you are getting tired than technically you are already fatigued. If you are moody, missing small details, nodding off etc you cannot simply "shake it off. It is your responsibility as a professional to attend to it.

What we need are conditions that allow us to be well rested and ready to go for all flights. Since we are increasingly getting those conditions that make that impossible, it is our responsibility to call fatigued period. Not anticipatory fatigued but fatigued.

"Anticipated" fatigue puts your pilot license at risk should there be an incident that requires FAA intrusion.

The more avoid this necessary approach to the conditions at our company the more we are screwing ourselves and others. I have no respect for pilots that use the anticipated fatigue game that saves the company the much deserved oversight these increased fatgue calls will cause.

I'm betting guys like NJAOwner agree: they don't want pilots nodding off in the cockpit. They are paying big bucks to make sure that isn't happening and if they can'y count on pilots to be the stop gap then how can the company (who is ultimately responsible) ever be held accountable to the only entity that seems to still matter, our owners?
 
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GlorifiedCabbie

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Our FOM tells us to notify them as soon as possible. When we stay at certain hotels( holiday Inn TEB), the quality of my sleep has forced me to shorten my day.
 

Imissmypilot

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Our FOM tells us to notify them as soon as possible. When we stay at certain hotels( holiday Inn TEB), the quality of my sleep has forced me to shorten my day.

I'm simply stating in the event of an accident or incident on a day there is a record of you anticipating fatigue, you will be hard pressed to find an excuse that will not put you in personal jeopardy. I do not care what the FOM says. When I am fatigued then I will call fatigued. I do NOT anticipate fatigue for the benefit of the company nor should any pilot with any sense. I take into account all factors and remain situationally aware so I know when or if I have to pull the trigger. It is professionally stupid to make scheduling a part of that personal process.

I am not risking my career so the company can continue to operate on inadequate crew ratios, cheap hotels and unsustainable duty days on end. I am also not going to help them avoid oversight. Yes, I know 99% of the rest of us do but I am no longer playing the game.

Don't play the game either Cabbie. We need more people to understand this.
 

GlorifiedCabbie

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Yes I agree. There are some days when I can tell ahead of time that I know I will be tired at a certain time. Other days, I cannot give much notice.
 

Imissmypilot

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Yes I agree. There are some days when I can tell ahead of time that I know I will be tired at a certain time. Other days, I cannot give much notice.

I hate to beat a dead horse but this is one issue we cannot drop if people still don't get it.

I did a review of all public information from the FAA and see no wiggle room to get away with the antipated fatigue excuse should an incident or accident happen during the time you involve the company and creep toward your anticipated fatigue time.

In other words, I do not care what the FOM says, you are taking a huge professional risk if you use the F word in any other circumstance then an immediate withdrawl of duty.

It is the responsibility of the company to insulate owners from the repercussions of fatigue, not the pilots. Period. Maybe owners should start demanding they do that by moving toward acceptable staffing levels and duty times. Outside of that, pardon the pun, but I will sleep just fine absolving myself of concern about the fallout of my professional conduct regarding fatigue.
 

GlorifiedCabbie

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Oh, I get it. When I start to nod off, that's it. When the other guy falls asleep, I take a picture. If he doesn't call fatigue, I do it for him. Next comes the phone call. I have the right to representation, something you don't have yet. Have never had a CGF-1 for a fatigue call. Next, why do you think they are using our pictures on the new app? The company wants to replace the wrinkled uniform/bloodshot eyes image with one that makes you look fit for duty.
 

Imissmypilot

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GC I know you get it; please don't take my interjections personally. However I also know how the average Flexjet pilot deals with fatigue and will interpret the FOM to continue to act unprofessionally and irresponsibly when it comes to fatigue calls. Guys will still rather call in sick and burn PTO then use the dreaded F bomb. Additionally a policy of anticipated fatigue makes the problem worse not better. Talk to our ASAP rep and you'll see fatigue at Flexjet the #1 contributing factor so obviously some would still rather fly tired than get on the company radar.

In the past, fatigue was not an issue. Prior to acquisition our average duty day 8-9 hours after nights in good hotels. Now the average duty day is 12 plus and our hotel quality has suffered.

The only thing that has remained is the personality profile - the get it done at all costs attitude. When the company was looking out for us, fail safes were in place to counter that attitude with a bent toward safety. Now it's the wild west. I hate to say it but we are a fatality waiting to happen. The only thing I can do is make sure it's not me.
 

shanes123

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Exactly. And when it does happen the company will throw the pilot under the bus. That's what they do. It's always been the pilots fault or the Unions.
 

NJAowner

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I have never had any issue with pilots and a delay to to fatigue. However, it is up to the company to management the fleet and crews in such a way such that the company can provide a quick, suitable recovery flight when fatigue does occur.

I do not know the flying rules and regulations, but I can see "prospective fatigue". Many times if I have a long drive I may think to myself, "I am fine now, but knowing my body I don't think I can handle a 6 hour drive". So while I would not be actually fatigued at the commencement, I know that I can not handle the mission.

Thanks for all for not flying fatigued! We appreciate it,
 

shanes123

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You may appreciate it NJAOWNER but FlexibleFlops don't appreciate it ..Probably why you are NJAOWNER and not Flexibleflopsowner
 
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