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Embarassing...but your opinion please...

jcaldwell

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For those of you in the regional life I'd like your opinion on this....

Presently I am 4000 TT 3500 multi piston PIC (C402C) for a part 135 operation, ATP, age 29.

Now the embrassing part...


:D

just after turning 18 I got mixed up with a bad crowd, ended up charged with a whole bunch of drug and theft related charges. That was dropped after they realised they picked up the wrong person, but they slapped me on the wrist with a conspiracy to be a moron and ruin your life charge for which ajudication was witheld. This means that you are not convicted of anything and may check 'no' to have you ever been convicted of a felony, misdemeanor and so on....
The problem is that the charges they gave me (even though it was someone else) would make John Gotti blush. Unfortunate, but that is the situation.

So I put it to you, how would I fare in a regional interview if I aced the interview and sim ride and it came time for the background check. Do I plead my case to the regional's review board, even try at all or just see what happens. It was after all 11 years ago and of course I've been close to sainthood ever since (the Pope just missed me).

Your input is appreciated....safe flying and keep the speed up in the turns.
 

RJPilott

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what was the charge?

most applications only ask if you have ever been convicted of something. check no and move on. If they ask you in the interview if you ever been arrested, you're going to have to tell them what you were arrested for and explain. We cant help you if we dont know the charge. Although if its bogus, (they really had the wrong guy) then its bogus and the records should reflect that in which case there isnt a problem.
 

cocknbull

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Check your local and state records to see if it even shows up. If you weren't convicted then it won't show. The FBI background checks show felonies only, depending on what your state turns over to them. However it does show arrest(s) not convictions. In this case I would get the court records and have them as proof you weren't convicted.
 

FlyinBrian

Office Slut
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Whatever you do, Don't lie. Even if you're pretty sure that there's no way anybody could find out, if you lie and they catch you at it. (even years later) You'll get canned.
 

jcaldwell

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RJPilott has good point. I don't know what the record looks like even if it is there. I'll look into it.
I agree with FlyinBrian, it is best to be upfront and straight forward.
 

jcaldwell

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To answer RJPilott the charge was conspiracy to committ theft. The real guy they wanted fled to the Dominican Republic with their money, so they threw everything at me even though I was a bystander.
 

Sun Devil 2000

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I had a very similar situation. It actally cost me a job once. Take it from someone who knows.. be upfront and tell prospective employers about it. If they find it later and you didnt tell them first it could reflect poorly on you.

Just my .02
 

WorldSeries

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i would say that if you where never convicted then you dont have anything to hide. for the applications that ask have you ever been convicted of a crime then check no, but if its asks have you ever been arrested then you should check yes. one option you can do is get the case expunged. once it is expunged, it is like it never happened and there wont be anything in your background check.
 

Bluto

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Hmm, careful with that one. I know of someone who lost a job after a so-called "expunged" incident came back to bite him. Read the fine print. Thoroughly research the legal status of your case. And make sure you follow the directions to the letter.
 

slapstick

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I've heard airlines can find out even if you've had it expunged. Don't report it if it asks if you've been convicted. If in an interview situation and they ask you about arrests, be honest and explain it, including especially what you learned from it.

Granted it wasn't for a flight crewmember position, I interviewed with Delta for a Flight Ops intern position. They didn't ask, but I volunteered info about my arrest, explained it with sincerity, and took responsibility for it, even though those f*kkn a-hole cops screwed me to set an example to others.


never would've suspected how corrupt the system could get until I got pulled in...always thought those critics were just paranoid.
 

capt_zman

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This is an absolutely true story, so bear with me. I use to fly citations with a guy who has an unbelievably bad record. He basically did the same thing, got caught up with the wrong crowd, got busted on a couple of drug charges, and then got nailed on at least 2 DUI's.

He went to interview at Eagle a couple of years ago, got through most of the day, and got pulled out just before the sim ride. The Eagle guy asked him about his offenses, which he told the truth, and was told to NEVER even apply to Eagle ever again and was sent home.

He's now a Dash 8 captain out of upstate New York.

So keep your head up and play the cards in your hand, you'll never know otherwise.
 

FlyinBrian

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I don't know the guy but...

couple of drug charges, and then got nailed on at least 2 DUI's.

I hope I don't get on his dash...

Don't mean to be too quick to judge, but there is a reason that we don't want some people flying...
 

jcaldwell

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Capt_zman brought up a good point here. I interviewed at Eagle awhile back and made it through up to that day long medical. The recruiters actually scheduled me for the medical before the sim ride which was a bit unusual. During the sim ride I got a borderline hold, and it was real close between a parallel and teardrop entry and I elected to do the teardrop. Technically this was not correct and the sim eval captain informed me that the sim rode was very good, except the choice of entry and that all had to do was come back in two weeks, demonstrate the correct entry and he would pass me on to the review board with a good recommendation. The jerk I was flying for at the time wouldn't give me the time off to go back (I fly in the southern Caribbean, so getting back was process). I am wondering if I made it that far, then based on what happened to the guy Capt_zman was talking about who got pulled before the sim (see reply above), did they run my background check already and not have a problem with it?

Does anybody know at what stage in the Eagle interview process they run the background check? Could be a glimmer of hope.

Many thanks for your comments.
 

dondk

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ajudication witheld is a "gray" area, be careful...

Some states construe "witholding" as a guilty plea. Some professions equally consider it to be an equivalent of guilty plea.

http://www1.fccj.org/lewine/Police Officer Qualifications.htm
Minimum Requirements for Employment as a law enforcement officer

Not have been convicted of any felony or of a misdemeanor involving perjury or false statement. Any person who, after July 1, 1981, pleads guilty or nolo contendere to, or is found guilty of a felony, or of a misdemeanor involving perjury or a false statement, shall not be eligible for employment or appointment as an officer, not-withstanding suspension of sentence or withholding of adjudication.

Beside's law enforcement, I believe some states have now included the "witholding ajudication" to teacher applicants as well as some Law schools will not accept a person with the same disposition.

Bottom line... find out how YOUR state interpets the disposition. As for expunging or "sealing" a case or dispostion it can be expensive. I believe you will need the DA to agree and a judge that is willing. There is no guarantee that it will work either.

I would FIND out first before and interview... I would do the FBI CHRC and have the results. Compare it to the list of 20 something disqualifying offenses.

If all was clean, then I would answer NO to the conviction as it is a TRUE statement. Knowing what the FBI report states (if the arrest is there) then I would talk about it, if it was not there, then I would not. Not all arrests are forwarded to the NCIC, not all convictions are either. It depends on the jurisdiction that handled your case.

Regardless. the best of luck !
 

sparticusflt

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I don't know I was arrested for drunken behavior after a cubs game. Nothing showed on my record, I think it was also for lude and lucivous behavior as well. Course I had evil friends, they were all just as drunk as I was and that day is little hazy to remember. I wasn't convicted of it, always marked no in the conviction box and now work for NJA. Still got the job now. I even got to spend 2 free days behind bars. Lesson learned, don't mouth off to cops when completely hammered. Best lesson to learn at 19.
 

Ty Webb

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Keep it simple.

If they ask if you have been convicted of any crimes, and the answer is "no", then check or say "no".

If the answer is "yes", then be honest, but be brief, concise, and to the point. In other words, don't dig yourself into a hole, talking too much. Too much background info can be just as bad as too little.

Keep it simple, and wrap it up on a good note, "I learned not to get into a business venture without thoroughly checking out the person I would be doing business with!" or "I learned not to say "Bad cop, no donut!" when caught urinating in an alley after too many Old Styles at the Cubbies game" or, better yet "I learned no to put myself in a position where I could end up screwing up my career". . . . . .
 
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