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EGE question

LJ45

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its being posted as a landing restriction for the temp runway. It's confusing for sure!
"- General aviation and private aviation activity will be maintained in a limited capacity through use of the airport's primary taxiway as an alternate runway for B-II category and design group aircraft and smaller"

The best I can tell from reading several publications is, B is the approach cat and II is the design group..aka a wing span limitation.

http://www.eaglecounty.us/airport/construction.cfm
 
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BobbyBiplane

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Try this:

1. Category A: Speed less than 91 knots
2. Category B: Speed 91 knots or more, but less than 121 knots

3. Category C: Speed 121 knots or more, but less than 141 knots
4. Category D: Speed 141 knots or more, but less than 166 knots
5. Category E: Speed 166 knots or more.
Airplane Design Group (Physical Characteristics). The airplane design group subdivides
airplanes by wingspan. The airplane design group concept links an airport's dimensional standards
to aircraft approach categories or to airplane design groups or to runway instrumentation
configurations.
1. Airplane Design Group I: Wingspan up to but not including 49 feet (15m)
2. Airplane Design Group II: Wingspan 45 feet (15m) up to but not including
79 feet (24m)
3. Airplane Design Group Ill: Wingspan 79 feet (24m) up to but not including
118 feet (36m)
4. Airplane Design Group IV: Wingspan 118 feet (36m) up to but not including
171 feet (52m)
5. Airplane Design Group V: Wingspan 171 feet (52m) up to but not including
214 feet (60m)
6. Airplane Design Group VI: Wingspan 214 feet (60m) up to but not including

* Per A/C 150/5300-13, Does not include military operations.

Bob
 

ksu_aviator

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so will the FAA be calling ??

If they where able to make a descent in vfr conditions from the mea to the intended field of landing and the wing span is under 79 feet than there is nothing wrong with the flight from what I can tell.
 

LJ45

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If they where able to make a descent in vfr conditions from the mea to the intended field of landing and the wing span is under 79 feet than there is nothing wrong with the flight from what I can tell.

It is a landing restriction, not an approach restriction in this case. Here is the NOTAM:

Eagle CO (Eagle County Rgnl) [EGE]: April NOTAM #27 Aerodrome closed aircraft wingspan GTR THAN 79 / approach speed GTR THAN 120KTS except ARC B - II and LWR effective from April 15th, 2009 at 09:00 AM CDT (0904151400) - September 01st, 2009 at 08:00 AM CDT (0909011300)
 

soarby007

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So what is the land weight load of the taxi-way? Is that something to be concerned with?
 

LJ45

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So what is the land weight load of the taxi-way? Is that something to be concerned with?

No, they said the taxi-way is rated for 250,000 lbs, or something like that. It has to do with the safety area being reduced around the taxi-way/temp runway while under construction.
 

siucavflight

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so will the FAA be calling ??
They may now that you pointed it out, as I know a few inspectors who are on this board!
 

ksu_aviator

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Last I looked the class has nothing to do with IFR/VFR its based on a speed. However relating it to IFR/VFR it assures you obstacle clearance within certain guidelines and distances...

Of course it is based on a speed. But where is it used? The only place I've seen it is on IFR approach plates. So if someone says the airport is limited to Class A&B aircraft, the assumption is that IFR approaches are the limitation and that a VFR approach would not have that restriction.
 

siucavflight

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Of course it is based on a speed. But where is it used? The only place I've seen it is on IFR approach plates. So if someone says the airport is limited to Class A&B aircraft, the assumption is that IFR approaches are the limitation and that a VFR approach would not have that restriction.
I think you are looking at it wrong KSU, the notam is simply closing the airport to any aircraft other than class A&B, it does not matter if you are doing an approach or not, you still always fall under one of those category of aircraft.
 

ksu_aviator

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Definative answer:

04/027 - AD CLSD ACFT WINGSPAN GTR THAN 79/APCH SPD GTR THAN 120KTS EXC ARC B-II AND LWR. 15 APR 14:00 2009 UNTIL 01 SEP 13:00 2009. CREATED: 13 APR 20:35 2009

The wingspan of a lear is just under 40 feet.

The approach speed is greater than 120 kts

BUT

It is an ARC B-II aircraft:

[FONT=EEMNHC+TimesNewRoman]Single-engine airplanes - ARC A-I and B-I [/FONT]
[FONT=EEMNHC+TimesNewRoman]Twin-piston engine airplanes - ARC B-I [/FONT]
[FONT=EEMNHC+TimesNewRoman]Twin-turbopropeller airplanes - ARC B-II [/FONT]
[FONT=EEMNHC+TimesNewRoman]Business jets (small cabin) - ARC B-II [/FONT]
[FONT=EEMNHC+TimesNewRoman]Business jets (medium to large cabin) - ARC C-II[/FONT]
 

ksu_aviator

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I think you are looking at it wrong KSU, the notam is simply closing the airport to any aircraft other than class A&B, it does not matter if you are doing an approach or not, you still always fall under one of those category of aircraft.

I was looking at it with the information I had, see the op. But, I broke it down and found the most accurate answer.
 

avbug

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So if someone says the airport is limited to Class A&B aircraft, the assumption is that IFR approaches are the limitation and that a VFR approach would not have that restriction.

Assumption doesn't become us, does it?

Don't assume. The NOTAM is clear. It doesn't provide a weight restriction. It does provide specific guidance as to what will and will not be allowed to operate into the airport during the specified time. The NOTAM specifically states that aerodrome, or airport, is closed to aircraft not meeting the specifications of the NOTAM.

ARC is Airport Reference Code. ARC IIB airport classification represents the "most demanding" aircraft that are anticipated to use an airport. It describes aircraft with approach landing speeds less than 121 knots, and a wingspan up to but not including 79'.

The ARC does not establish, and is not, an instrument approach category classification. It's an airport classification, typically describing the standard to which an airport is built or planned, given the nature of the aircraft anticipated to be using the field. The ARC doesn't provide a restriction; it's simply a descriptive number. Aircraft with larger wingspans and faster speeds aren't necessarily barred from using an ARC IIB field...because it's a design classification, and not a restriction.

In this case, however, the NOTAM provides the restriction.

Aircraft meeting ARC IIB may use the field, provided they have an approach speed of 121 knots or less and a wingspan less than 79.

VFR or IFR is irrelevant.
 

ksu_aviator

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In this case, however, the NOTAM provides the restriction.

Aircraft meeting ARC IIB may use the field, provided they have an approach speed of 121 knots or less and a wingspan less than 79.

VFR or IFR is irrelevant.

You misread the NOTAM. The closure is to aircraft over 79 foot wing span and/or an approach speed over 120 knots EXCEPT for ARC BII aircraft.

I take that to mean an ARC BII aircraft (i.e. a lear 35) can us KEGE.
 
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