Commercial VFR conditions cross countries...

gkrangers

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For the comm you need to have a few XCs in "VFR conditions".

Can I fly the flight IFR, as long as the weather meets the VFR criteria?

There is also "5 hours solo in Night VFR conditions"..Well I just got about 7 hours of that, all VMC, but on an IFR flight plan.

So not sure if I can use some of this stuff or not...
 
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ePilot22

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61.129(a)(3)(iii),(iv)

(iii) One cross-country flight of at least 2 hours in a single-engine airplane in day VFR conditions........

(iv) One cross-country flight of at least 2 hours in a single-engine airplane in night VFR condition......

Nothing about being on an IFR flight plan. Just remain in VFR and I think you're good to go.

gkrangers said:
There is also "5 hours solo in Night VFR conditions"..Well I just got about 7 hours of that, all VMC, but on an IFR flight plan.

So not sure if I can use some of this stuff or not...
I don't see why not. Nothing in the regs. prohibiting it.
 

nosehair

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It really depends on the Examiner's opinion or interpretation of the regulation where it says "day VFR conditions". hmmm...."conditions"...what does that mean? Personally, I think the whole x/c should be training on VFR conditions such as altitudes, pilotage & dead reckoning, finding VFR airports without the aid of electronic navigation devices, etc. I think the general idea is to re-visit those VFR items, not just do an IFR flight in VMC conditions.
That's my opinion, and I realize it as such, but you will also have Examiners with the same idea. I think this issue has been discussed on John Lynches' FAQ webpage, and I think this is also his opinion.
 

NYCPilot

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Although the wording is a bit ambiguous, I think there is more to be gained by flying the trip under VFR. My long x-ctry took over 8 hours back and forth and I learned a heck of a lot by the end of it. For one thing, VFR was not forecast along my entire route either. I had to do a lot of diverting and skimming below low clouds in order to complete the trip. All legally though. Low ceilings and marginal VFR along my route. Navaids going dead and ATC not even being aware. Turbulent conditions and sunny weather was how the trip begin. One heck of a trip.

A lot of guys would do this with another pilot which is not correct. Sitting there by myself, encoutering all of the elements one might find in such a journey was very helpful in developing my piloting and decision making skills.
 

ePilot22

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Ok....

nosehair said:
the whole x/c should be training on VFR conditions such as altitudes, pilotage & dead reckoning, finding VFR airports without the aid of electronic navigation devices, etc.
Your right, I would agree with this.

VFR is Part 91.151-91.159 and validates what Nosehair said.

If your on an IFR flight plan you're flying in IFR conditions, i.e. Part 91.167 and so on. Not necessairly in actual but fuel regs., flight plan info, equipment, ATC clearances and navigation. Not exactly VFR:(
 

midlifeflyer

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Since these are dual training flights, it's probably going to be up to your instructor whether the two of you do them on an IFR flight plan or not.

In my case, not, for the reasons nosehair mentioned. Besides, being on an IFR flight plan would cramp my ability to throw a monkey wrench into the mix such as a diversion to an unplanned airport due to a weather or systems problem.
 

gkrangers

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midlifeflyer said:
Since these are dual training flights, it's probably going to be up to your instructor whether the two of you do them on an IFR flight plan or not.

In my case, not, for the reasons nosehair mentioned. Besides, being on an IFR flight plan would cramp my ability to throw a monkey wrench into the mix such as a diversion to an unplanned airport due to a weather or systems problem.
Ahh, the 2 hour ones are dual?

And I do agree with you that the reg is meant to be interpretted as a VFR flight...its not a big deal for me to go and satisfy the requirements, just seeing if I could legitimately use some flights I've made that satisfy the time and distance requirements.
 

minitour

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gkrangers said:
Ahh, the 2 hour ones are dual?
Yep...that's listed as the "training" you need.

...but the long solo one doesn't say VFR...so go for it.

-mini
 

MauleSkinner

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For what it's worth, from the 61.129 FAQ's...

QUESTION: Could you meet the requirements of FAR 61.129(a)(3)(ii) & (iii) with a VFR trip in which your instructor placed you under the hood? The regulation specifically calls for day VFR conditions (let's assume for this question that the entire trip was under VFR conditions), so, does the fact that you may be under the hood negate the intent of the regulations?
I guess another way to put it would be to say, the FARs require you to log the conditions of flight. Under 61.51(b)(3), if you log hood time, are you excluded from logging day or night as a condition of the flight?
ANSWER: I assume you meant to say § 61.129(a)(3)(iii) and (iv).
Reference § 61.129(a)(3)(iii) and (iv), in pertinent part, it states:
". . . VFR conditions . . ." And VFR stands for visual flight rules.
No, you cannot do this under the hood.
Fly safe!

David
 
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