CFI checkride

sqwkvfr

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Hey fellas, I've been stressing about an upcoming CFI checkride and I'm hoping to hear from other CFIs about what subjects they got hung up on during their checkrides.

Is there any area that you wish you would have hit a little harder before the checkride?

Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.
 

Crimson03

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Best thing is if you know or can find someone who did a recent cfi ride with the same examiner and ask the guy what the examiner asked, what he was picky about etc.
 

mattpilot

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I hear that literally everyone gets asked about the weights on the ailerons and what their purpose is.
 

labbats

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I didn't.

My best advice would be to make flashcards of the outline of the book. Have someone quiz you and have you expand on the outline, card for card, question for question. If you can do that, you ace the oral.
 

labbats

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Yeah, sorry it's been a while for me. Go through the gleim book. It has an outline of everything you could be asked. Create flashcards with each of the individual parts of that outline. Where I went to school we had to have those memorized and the chief pilot would sit us down and ask us each part, then have us describe some of various ones. I think they had a 98% first time pass rate. When you have the questions memorized, it's hard to say too much or too little on your checkride and get yourself into a bind. Because that is all they are legally allowed to ask you. The outline from the book.
 

sqwkvfr

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labbats said:
Yeah, sorry it's been a while for me. Go through the gleim book. It has an outline of everything you could be asked. Create flashcards with each of the individual parts of that outline. Where I went to school we had to have those memorized and the chief pilot would sit us down and ask us each part, then have us describe some of various ones. I think they had a 98% first time pass rate. When you have the questions memorized, it's hard to say too much or too little on your checkride and get yourself into a bind. Because that is all they are legally allowed to ask you. The outline from the book.
Beautiful.

I've got the Gleim's in front of me right now...a trip to Target in the morning and I'll be set.

Thank you very much.
 

JetSpeed219

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I'm about to take my CFI ride and all of the recent applicants at my FBO have said make sure to know aerodynamics and weight and balance very well......
 

minitour

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labbats said:
Because that is all they are legally allowed to ask you. The outline from the book.
I disagree. They can ask you anything from the PTS legally. That includes all references in the PTS (Airplane Flying Handbook, ACs, PHAK, etc). The Gliem is good....but it isn't referenced in the PTS.

I'd start at the front of the PTS.

Become very familiar with the special emphasis areas (specifically - Runway incursions & checklist usage) and why they are there. Read up (and perhaps have with you for your oral) the ACs on Wake Turbulence, preflight, weight & balance, etc.

I like the flash card idea. You do a flash card for each task in the PTS and have someone quiz you on it and you should do fine in the oral. The flight is just a commercial checkride from the other seat with more talking. The way I do it is just *say* what I'm *thinking* when I do the maneuvers. What, why, how, when, why again, what to look for, what to do if I d!ck it up...that kinda stuff.

Also, know the endorsement requirements for students, the 61.31 endorsements, know your 91 regs and how they apply. You should have a really strong foundation on basic aerodynamics and weather (my worst subject). The better you know and understand the basics, the easier everything else will be for you.

Oh yeah...one more thing.


RELAX and HAVE FUN!

Good luck with it!

-mini
 
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blueraider

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well this is my first post but have the commercial pts as well as the cfi pts, you should be able to teach TO the cfi pts as well as perform to the commercial standards, the cfi pts lays out on what tasks the examiner shall choose just remember when you get to the flight portion of your ride never shut up and don't use the word actually, had my CFI ride bout two weeks ago and it was the best ride I had, didn't bust my chops to bad just wanted to see if I could teach what he wanted to know, remember "building blocks if learning" start small these guys know you can give them every detail of the airplane they want to know but can you give that information to someone who does not, study up on the FOI stuff and be able to go over the maneuvers like the back of the hand. Good Luck man you'll be fine
 

labbats

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Isn't Gleim the PTS? If it isn't the PTS outline is what I was referring to all along.

Shoot, it's been too long since I instructed. I need to stop giving advice on here.
 

blueraider

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pts you need...

The faa title for the practical test standards you seek are (FAA-S-8081-12B and FAA-S-8081-6BS) if you go the the faa web site you should be able to type these codes in and get the info you need. Your local fbo should carry these as well. The ones that I have are published by ASA..hope this helps
 

chriskcmo

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The FAA loves to see you plagarize their stuff (Airplane Flying Handbook, Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, etc.). Use their images, use quotes from them, etc. in your lesson plans and student handouts.
 

moxiepilot

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the PTS has everythig they can ask you lined out from the FOI to W&B. That's your bible. Didn't your instructor point this out? By now you should know; you're no longer a student, you're an instructor!

i also disagree with blurider, the airplane is not the place to be yapping incessantly. the examiner wants to see if you can TEACH the maneuvers in the airplane as if you were teaching a student. if you give a discourse you risk loosing the student to boredom. the long explinations are left for the ground portion where you teach the examiner the maneuver during your ORAL.
 

blueraider

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...

Maybe my examiner was a little different but if I was not comunicating to him on what and why I was doing throughout the flight duration (if I was flying or he was flying) than that was a bust there should never be idle time for your student. you can preach collision avoidance aircraft monitoring of systems if it comes to your mind and its about the flight speak it, holding short mention rwy incursion avoidance and to back up a previous poster Pilots Handbook of Aero Knowledge and Airplane flying Handbook are both FAA pubs and I'm sure the examiner would not mind if you ref. them in your lesson plan, area IV FAA-S-8081-6B, good luck
 

Fly_Chick

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Go into the CFI Oral with a cross-country lesson planned, and take the lead. Having a cross-country planned ahead of time gives you the upper-hand. You will be in a position to explain cross-counrty planning, navigation, pilotage, aircraft weight and balance, airworthiness, aircraft performance, aerodynamics. weather services and interpretation, sectional and TAC interpretation, navigation logs, use of E6B, alternates, diversions, fuel consumption.

I approached this checkride completely different from my other check-rides. No longer was I being asked the questions, yet I was guiding the discussion and asking the questions.

If you go into the CFI checkride taking the lead, that seems to help, as you are being evaluated on your ability to teach, and gives the examiner insight as to how you will guide your students.

Good Luck.
 

Tarzan

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I'll second the PTS stuff. I had a question, What requirements for a private pilot." One of the requirements is to speak, read and understand English. "How do I know if this student meets the criteria?" If you know your PTS very well, you'll find a reference to an advisory circular for English. Know about the marix in the front of the PTS because your going to get plenty of the, A guy wants to get Private Single and already has his Multi Private, what does he have to do for the checkride and how would you endorse?"

I would also have a small model airplane to help demonstarte how manuevers are accomplished. Remember, most people learn best when it's visual and verbalized. I think the number 92% fall into one of those catagories or both. Make sure you have dry erase markers that work. If you get a chance, get your AGI and teach a private ground school class, it'll do wonders for your confidence to get in front of people.

Finally, know Part 61 that covers Student, Private and Commercial. Know Part 61 that covers Student, Private and Commercial. Know Part 61 that covers Student, Private and Commercial. And if he asks what you need to train a student on before you solo that person, you shouldn't be there in the first place. My examiner wouldn't let me look but if you think about it, you'll them. Just don't forget go-arounds and foward slips.

And 80% bust their first time. Lots of this FSDO examiners seem to have an agenda. Go in humble but confident. Almost oxymoronish.

Good luck!
 

Rogue5

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I wish I'd spent more time practicing maneuvers with someone in the plane rather than solo.

My FAA examiner was about 6'6" and pushing 280lbs... I remember the plane flying totally different, especially the power-off simulated emergency landing.
 
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