career change success stories

msk2468

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I haven't updated my profile in quite a while, but I have been working for a regional for a while and toying with the idea of a career change because of personal reasons. I have a four year degree from a good school and some internships in business, but all of my post college experience is flying related. Just wondering of anyone was able to make a good transition to any business fields or other non-flying jobs. I have done a search of past posts but just wanted some additional info. Thanks
 

finnjl

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I made a carrer change from a regional pilot as I thought it would be better as I would be at home more often, better management, etc. Well, the grass is not always greener on the other side of the fence as I am going back into flying. I start class in a couple of weeks working for a regional again. Make sure you really want to give up flying when you quit as you have to start at the begining again.
 

FurloughedAgain

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I'm working on my masters degree with the goal of seeing what else is out there.

This is a good thread. I'm looking forward to reading some of the responses.
 
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rk772

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I quit flying for 3 years. I went back to college and started another career. It didn't last long and I was back flying again. It really doesn't matter how much money your new career pays. If flying is in your blood, you won't be happy unless your doing it.
 

taters

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I am an insurance agent right now and my office is covered in airline garb from when I was there....I make more than a 3rd year fo right now and I actually miss the ramp...just being around it....per previous post...make darn sure you want this...because youll find no amount of $$ can replace being a part of this industry , especially if it is something that is "in your blood" like rk 772 stated......I'm doing the opposite of what you are doing, When I start flying professionaly I will take the paycut of my life..for a while......But hey if it something you gotta do,,Im sure you will be fine...professional


experience is professional experience ,plus you have a college degree....good luck to you sir
 
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mamba20

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Thank freaking god! Finally some positive words about our career. I agree, we could be a lot worse off folks!
 

pilotyip

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I worked for two 121 carriers, left the first one for the second one, the second one was going out of business, so I went corporate, lost that job in the depression of 1982. Started my own buiness while moon lighting for Uncle Sams' P-3 flying club, run it for five years, missed being around pilots and airplanes when back flying for a commuter, it went out of business in the depression of 1991, got a corp gig again, they sold their airplane in 1996, went back to a 121 cargo outfit, they went out of business in 1997. Then this fantastic job at USA Jet airlines came along, I am the luckiest SOB in the world. I am living well, doing what I want, and although I missed the really good jobs all in all in has been a real adventure and I would change very little. What is the difference between a recession and a depression, in a depression you loose your job. In a recession other people loose their jobs. There is a thread named "Career change poll, it answers this same question
 

rk772

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pilotyip said:
I worked for two 121 carriers, left the first one for the second one, the second one was going out of business, so I went corporate, lost that job in the depression of 1982. Started my own buiness while moon lighting for Uncle Sams' P-3 flying club, run it for five years, missed being around pilots and airplanes when back flying for a commuter, it went out of business in the depression of 1991, got a corp gig again, they sold their airplane in 1996, went back to a 121 cargo outfit, they went out of business in 1997. Then this fantastic job at USA Jet airlines came along, I am the luckiest SOB in the world. I am living well, doing what I want, and although I missed the really good jobs all in all in has been a real adventure and I would change very little. What is the difference between a recession and a depression, in a depression you loose your job. In a recession other people loose their jobs. There is a thread named "Career change poll, it answers this same question

You forgot to mention your job as an English Professor.
Sorry, I couldn’t resist making fun of this grammatical train wreck.
 

Flyingdutchman

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Who cares? the guys is a pilot. not a professor. I don't write for a living, I fly.
 

Always deferred

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I was a Riddle grad, was once afflicted with SJS, spent 3 years at ACA/FLYi before being furloughed. I was hired at COEX, ASA, and CHQ but turned them all down, because I didn't want to trade in 2000 hrs of jet experience at ACA for first year pay and a possible repeat career path. I accepted a desk job as a regulatory and safety program mgr position at an aerospace trade association in DC. I miss flying but the QOL i have now would make it hard to return. I moved to downtown DC, can plan my life months in advance, am home everynight, can meet friends for happy hour, don't have to go through security (or even carry an ID) and dont have to worry about being outsourced.

The only way I'd go back is if FLYi recalled me and things were looking very good there. Otherwise for now, CAP flying, Angel Flight, and just plain fun flying are what I plan to do. Also might go to grad school.

A lot can be said for what you love to do, but a lot more can be said for a little stability. And once you experience city living, and this lifestyle, it's hard to go back.


Ask me again in a year though...


Hope this helps.



AD
 

Prop2Jet

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I to left flying and earned a Masters of Science degree. I followed my "new" career path. After about 3.5 months I could no longer stand pre-flghting my desk and dealing with people who were so mundane. I have posted this numerous times, but probably through the wrong threads, but money does not make a person as happy as you might think. I took well over a 50% pay cut to fly again and I think it was a great decision.
Do seek out more education though. If and when the next round of furloughs happens I know I will have the advanced to degree to get a good paying job in DC until I am recalled.

Cheers

P2J
 
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throttlemonkey

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I have been involved in both flying and home improvements for a number of years now. Personally, I like flying more than pounding nails. Unfortunately, they both get into your blood. My current flying job is ok and allows for some small construction side work. I view this as beneficial in that I still get to fly and don't have to need the gym anymore.

Sometimes, I hate airplanes so much that I want to just give it up. Just remember to leave all of the company bs on the ground.

If the industry worries you,(it worries me) I suggest getting into to something on the side. It may keep you out of financial straits and I find it to be great therapy when I really start to hate the industry.
 

airludy

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I have been applying to regionals and have a few interviews coming up. I also have an opportunity to become a partner in a fairly established business. I think withing 2 years I will be making at least 70,000$ per year. Also I can live in the city I love, have control of my future, home everynight and weekend. Its a tough decision. I love flying, but I hate the industry. It might be better to just CFI a couple nights a week and fly for fun. Im almost 30 and live at home with my parents. Im sick and tired of being broke. Making 19k-50k at a regional is not enough to live in my part of the country. Money is not everything, but you cant live without it!
 

StaySeated

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If you are asking whether one could leave a 121 position for a 9-5 gig, I personally believe the answer is no. With that being said, there are a ton of things out there that one can do on their own to provide a sizeable income stream. Even before the most recent downturn I was paranoid about my future in this industry. Once the bottom dropped out I started my plan B. It has worked out very well. I have a side job that pays the bills, funds my own retirement plan, and almost covers my wife's addiction to black shoes. I still fly full time and work on most of my days off but once my joke of an airline gets its sh1t together I plan on dropping most of trips and working four days a week at home. Do your homework and think of a sector that interests you. Keep in mind, there is no cake walk side job that will pay you to eat peanuts and do crosswords and soduko puzzles. It will require a lot of work but the reward is not having to depend on an industry that is spiraling out of control to the lowest bidder. I know of friends/coworkers that work in real estate,finance,construction,recruiting,etc. Good luck.
 

bigbird

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Yeah you definatly need a side gig....Pretty hard to pick up women making 25,000$ a year. You can hardly afford rent let alone go out and have a good time.
 

FN FAL

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I'm thinking that I can take my Criminal Justice Degree and turn it into a management position with the State Bureau of Prisons. Seeing as fuel is going up to 6 bucks a gallon, I figure wide spread layoffs and runaway inflation is going to insure a spiralling out of control crime wave. So at least I'll have that going for me.
 

FlyBunny

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Good Thread...

I was quite established in my career as a research assistant and meeting and involved with incredible people, but flying was in the blood (father/mother) and decided a career change...became a CFI, worked the corporate gig, and now at the airlines (…and I met incredible people here as well!) ...some of you are right on...I love flying, but the management part, RONs, hotels, security, and the bickering just is too much...I got in touch with the professor I was working with and got the first gig back, working that job full time while I flew full-time...that keeps me busy when not flying...and gives me a much needed reprieve...seriously thinking of leaving this to continue further education in my first profession...but I want to keep flying too...yep, money doesn't make us all happy, but it helps with the bills and lifestyle...for me QOL means more than anything...if you're serious about a career change...do what makes you happy because you can always fly...it doesn't have to be airline flying...there are so many part 91 and 135 operations who employ part-time pilots and QOL is quite good...and don't worry about your 'info upgrade', it has no meaning on this board...after all no one can really substantiate the numbers...a student from my previous flight school is on this board as a CRJ pilot...showing over 2000 hours of TT...

Good Luck with your 'career change' decision!

Bunny
 

AZ Typed

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A career change has been one of the best decisions I've made in my life. I spent 5 years getting my certificates, 2 years instructing and nearly 5 years flying little RJs around the midwest and east coast. In November of 2003 I'd had it with scheduling, pay, QOL, whining, commuting, and most of all I saw no future as an airline pilot. Most of the folks I was flying with were 35-50. The 50 year-olds looked worn and were mostly cranky, missed lots of family events, and had lost sight of living. The 35 year-olds were having kids, enjoying the left seat, never home, sorta clueless about their future plan, and had dreams of getting on a SWA, UPS or FDX. To me, it seemed they were perfectly positioned to end up like the cranky 50-year old RJ captain. And most had no backup money or plan for when their airline career hit a bump in the road.


I started looking for something else to do. I wanted lots of time off, high pay, a good schedule, and a future I could control. So, I got licensed in insurance and securities and started helping people with their finances from risk management to debt, education, and retirement planning. I'm now starting to set up and take over small-business retirement accounts and have built a small team of mortgage brokers, too. The first year was tough, as with anything you do on your own, but now it's starting to pay off. I'm getting more money under management (which pays me for years) and meeting all kinds of middle-americans. I don't worry about the price of gas, I take time off (more than I ever had as a high-seniority FO), make more money, and I control my own future.

A career change was one of the best decisions I've made. I'm lucky enough to do a little flying on the side now in a light jet to get my "fix". I still watch every airplane that flies over until it disappears. But I don't miss any of the BS associated with a career as an airline pilot. It's just not worth it, long term, to me.

I once read: "When your values are clear, your decisions are easy." That little phrase made my decision easy and I don't regret leaving airline life one bit. Hope this helps...

AZT
 

Bryan D

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I've been around and I'm here to tell you that any job that is worth having comes with it's own set of problems. I had a dead end job that paid about what a second or third year captain at the regional level makes but, it gave me headaches and I began talking to myself out loud on the drive home after work everyday. Changed careers and here I am, whole new set of problems but I enjoy my work at least.
 

Flying_Corporal

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msk2468 said:
I have done a search of past posts but just wanted some additional info. Thanks

This is a wrong msg board to get a good opinion poll. Everyone here is either flying for a living or aspiring to fly for a living.

Those that once flew and decided to quit probably don't read messages in regional airline msg board.

FC
 
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