• NC Software is having a Black Friday Sale Event thru December 4th on Logbook Pro, APDL - Airline Pilot Logbook, Cirrus Elite Binders, and more. Use coupon code BF2020 at checkout to redeem 15% off your purchase. Click here to shop now.
  • NC Software is proud to announce the release of APDL - Airline Pilot Logbook version 10.0. Click here to view APDL on the Apple App store and install now.

Asa Pilots Burn Their Money-no Contract

scarlet

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 7, 2005
Posts
1,048
Total Time
1200
ASA pilots ---Mangmt. does not know that we control most of the cost of the airline...or I should say Chuck does not know. oh wait he is gone!!!!

Lets burn those APUs alot longer!!!
Burn those lights more!!!
Taxi holding the brakes!!!
Taxi both engines!!!

AND FLY SAFE!!!!!
 

WWEfan

One List
Joined
Nov 30, 2003
Posts
617
Total Time
39 yrs
The other route

I am going to give our NEW management the benefit of the doubt and start exercising all those fuel saving initiatives....something I never did under the old regime. Our new owners are already off to a good start by cleaning house at the GO. I'm giving them a couple of months to make some headway on the contract. If I hear from our negotiators that things still aren't changing then I'll go back to 2 engine taxis, riding brakes, APU on, etc.
 

Kaman

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
947
Total Time
8.2
Taxi while riding the brakes? Thats about the most asinine comment that I've read here. I can understand not being happy with your management, but that kind of behavior is more damaging to your fellow pilots than it will be to managment. Your brethern pilots will be the ones stuck writing needless MELs, taking delays that will impact their quality of life and suffering for fools like yourself.

Regards,

ex-Navcy Rotorhead
 

atlcrashpad

Can't hold me down
Joined
Apr 20, 2004
Posts
1,309
Total Time
Bling
Why do that?

Why on Earth would you even say something like that? I will give our "New" management the benefit of the doubt. In time their true colors will come out. I will not risk my career for stupid stunts like you suggest.
 

capt. megadeth

Metal Momma!
Joined
Oct 12, 2003
Posts
2,898
Total Time
>4999
That will show 'em! I am sure once they catch on they will give you more money.

:rolleyes:
 

RJ CrewDawg

Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2005
Posts
5
Total Time
Zero.
Are you serious??

What in the world would you hope to accomplish?? Not that I mind a little extra job security with all those brake and light bulb changes. Oh, and don't forget the sticker for the APU! :rolleyes:

Good luck in your quest!
 

No Delay

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2004
Posts
484
Total Time
4000+
Hell, don't stop there. Why don't you go throw rocks at the windows in the G.O.?

Fuc-Tard!
 

~~~^~~~

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 21, 2001
Posts
6,137
Total Time
7,500+
No Delay said:
Hell, don't stop there. Why don't you go throw rocks at the windows in the G.O.?

Fuc-Tard!
I don't really want to waste gas and tear up airplanes, but if we could throw rocks at the G.O. - Count me in!

:) I think DALPA's offices are still in there too :)

I'll volunteer to rescue the new hire flight attendants from the 7th floor.
 

shamrock

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2001
Posts
1,786
Total Time
1 year
~~~^~~~ said:
I don't really want to waste gas and tear up airplanes, but if we could throw rocks at the G.O. - Count me in!

I'll be there too. Walking in circles is boring, breaking stuff is where it's at! :smash: It'll be a good workout trying to reach the 8th floor. The choice of projectile will be critical. Too heavy and it won't make it up there, too light and it will just bounce off. I love a challenge. :nuts:
 

Shobra

Well-known member
Joined
May 23, 2005
Posts
58
Total Time
enough
yeah, yeah, breaking stuff is cool. :smash: yeah yeah. he he he
 

Cardenal

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 7, 2003
Posts
53
Total Time
7000
Well, whatever goodwill Atkin & Co. built up will go up in smoke if the rumors about or travel benefits are true.
 

No Delay

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2004
Posts
484
Total Time
4000+
Originally posted by ~~~^~~~
I'll volunteer to rescue the new hire flight attendants from the 7th floor.

Yeah, those old ladies will need some help getting down the stairs.

The one I am flying with this month has to be the same age as my grandmother...grouchy too! She fussed out someone on the night cleaning crew for taking a coke.
 

~~~^~~~

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 21, 2001
Posts
6,137
Total Time
7,500+
No Delay said:
The one I am flying with this month has to be the same age as my grandmother...grouchy too! She fussed out someone on the night cleaning crew for taking a coke.
Scary, I know who you are talking about. She is, uhm, well, nevermind.
 

Tomct

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 4, 2004
Posts
2,062
Total Time
11000+
:cool:We could get some surgical tubes and use them like GIANT sling-shots and just ripp the Granite Palace a new one!! Count me in!:uzi:
 

mxflyer

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 8, 2004
Posts
76
Total Time
10000
you guys are why i and 1000 others quit the airlines...s t f u. and do your job or quit and work at wall-mart.....youd make more $
 

Dave Benjamin

an over 40 victim of fate
Joined
Jun 12, 2003
Posts
1,040
Total Time
5300+
Professionalism

For those of you contemplating sabotage may I direct your attention to the ALPA code of ethics? Although you may or may not be happy with ALPA I think most of us would agree with the code of ethics.

This is excerpted verbatim from the ALPA website

http://alpa.org/?tabid=270


An Air Line Pilot will keep uppermost in his mind that the safety, comfort, and well-being of the passengers who entrust their lives to him are his first and greatest responsibility.
• He will never permit external pressures or personal desires to influence his judgment, nor will he knowingly do anything that could jeopardize flight safety.
• He will remember that an act of omission can be as hazardous as a deliberate act of commission, and he will not neglect any detail that contributes to the safety of his flight, or perform any operation in a negligent or careless manner.
• Consistent with flight safety, he will at all times operate his aircraft in a manner that will contribute to the comfort, peace of mind, and well-being of his passengers, instilling in them trust in him and the airline he represents.
• Once he has discharged his primary responsibility for the safety and comfort of his passengers, he will remember that they depend upon him to do all possible to deliver them to their destination at the scheduled time.
• If disaster should strike, he will take whatever action he deems necessary to protect the lives of his passengers and crew.
An Air Line Pilot will faithfully discharge the duty he owes the airline that employs him and whose salary makes possible his way of life.
• He will do all within his powers to operate his aircraft efficiently and on schedule in a manner that will not cause damage or unnecessary maintenance.
• He will respect the officers, directors, and supervisors of his airline, remembering that respect does not entail subservience.
• He will faithfully obey all lawful directives given by his supervisors, but will insist and, if necessary, refuse to obey any directives that, in his considered judgment, are not lawful or will adversely affect flight safety. He will remember that in the final analysis the responsibility for safe completion of the flight rests upon his shoulders.
• He will not knowingly falsify any log or record, nor will he condone such action by other crew members.
• He will remember that a full month’s salary demands a full and fair month’s work. On his days off, he will not engage in any occupation or activity that will diminish his efficiency or bring discredit to his profession.
• He will realize that he represents the airline to all who meet him and will at all times keep his personal appearance and conduct above reproach.
• He will give his airline, its officers, directors, and supervisors the full loyalty that is their due, and will refrain from speaking ill of them. If he feels it necessary to reveal and correct conditions that are not conducive to safe operations and harmonious relations, he will direct his criticism to the proper authorities within ALPA.
• He will hold his airline’s business secrets in confidence, and will take care that they are not improperly revealed.
An Air Line Pilot will accept the responsibilities as well as the rewards of command and will at all times so conduct himself both on duty and off as to instill and merit the confidence and respect of his crew, his fellow employees, and his associates within the profession.
• He will know and understand the duties of each member of his crew. If in command, he will be firm but fair, explicit yet tolerant of deviations that do not affect the safe and orderly completion of the flight. He will be efficient yet relaxed, so that the duties of the crew may be carried out in a harmonious manner.
• If in command, he will expect efficient performance of each crew member’s duties, yet he will overlook small discrepancies and refrain from unnecessary and destructive criticism, so that the crew member will retain his self-respect and cooperative attitude. A frank discussion of minor matters of technique and performance after the flight will create goodwill and a desire to be helpful, whereas sharp criticism and peremptory orders at the moment will result only in the breakdown of morale and an inefficient, halting performance of future duties.
• An Air Line Pilot will remember that his is a profession heavily dependent on training during regular operations and, if in command, will afford his flight crew members every reasonable opportunity, consistent with safety and efficiency, to learn and practice. He will endeavor to instill in his crew a sense of pride and responsibility. In making reports on the work and conduct of his crew members, he will avoid personal prejudices, make his reports factual and his criticisms constructive so that actions taken as a result of his reports will improve the knowledge and skill of his crew members, rather than bring discredit, endanger their livelihood, and threaten their standing in the profession.
• While in command, the Air Line Pilot will be mindful of the welfare of his crew. He will see to it that his crew are properly lodged and cared for, particularly during unusual operating conditions. When cancellations result in deadheading, he will ensure that proper arrangements are made for the transportation of his crew before he takes care of himself.
An Air Line Pilot will conduct his affairs with other members of the profession and with ALPA in such a manner as to bring credit to the profession and ALPA as well as to himself.
• He will not falsely or maliciously injure the professional reputation, prospects, or job security of another pilot, yet if he knows of professional incompetence or conduct detrimental to the profession or to ALPA, he will not shrink from revealing this to the proper authorities within ALPA, so that the weak member may be brought up to the standards demanded, or ALPA and the profession alike may be rid of one unworthy to share its rewards.
• He will conduct his affairs with ALPA and its members in accordance with the rules laid down in the Constitution and By-Laws of ALPA and with the policies and interpretations promulgated therefrom. Whenever possible, he will attend all meetings of ALPA open to him and will take an active part in its activities and in meetings of other groups calculated to improve air safety and the standing of the profession.
• An Air Line Pilot shall refrain from any action whereby, for his personal benefit or gain, he take advantage of the confidence reposed in him by his fellow members. If he is called upon to represent ALPA in any dispute, he will do so to the best of his ability, fairly and fearlessly, relying on the influence and power of ALPA to protect him.
• He will regard himself as a debtor to his profession and ALPA, and will dedicate himself to their advancement. He will cooperate in the upholding of the profession by exchanging information and experience with his fellow pilots and by actively contributing to the work of professional groups and the technical press.
An Air Line Pilot the honor of his profession is dear, and he will remember that his own character and conduct reflect honor or dishonor upon the profession.
• He will be a good citizen of his country, state, and community, taking an active part in their affairs, especially those dealing with the improvement of aviation facilities and the enhancement of air safety.
• He will conduct all his affairs in a manner that reflects credit on himself and his profession.
• He will remember that to his neighbors, friends, and acquaintances he represents both the profession and ALPA, and that his actions represent to them the conduct and character of all members of the profession and ALPA.
• He will realize that nothing more certainly fosters prejudices against and deprives the profession of its high public esteem and confidence than do breaches in the use of alcohol.
• He will not publish articles, give interviews, or permit his name to be used in any manner likely to bring discredit to another pilot, the airline industry, the profession, or ALPA.
• He will continue to keep abreast of aviation developments so that his skill and judgment, which heavily depend on such knowledge, may be of the highest order.
Having Endeavored to his utmost to faithfully fulfill the obligations of the ALPA Code of Ethics and Canons for the Guidance of Air Line Pilots, a pilot may consider himself worthy to be called…an AIRLINE PILOT.
 
Top