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5 ways to save money becoming a professional pilot

diggertwo

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http://www.pilotbug.com/?p=528

1. Go 141 – If you are starting out from scratch, consider a Part 141 flight school. You can complete your commercial rating in 190 hours vs the 250 hours you would need if you were to train in a regular Part 61 school. The difference is in the curriculum. The FAA has determined that the regimented syllabus approach provided by a 190 hour Part 141 school will produce the same quality of pilot that 250 hours of Part 61 training generates.

2. Comm. AMEL first- By getting your Commercial Multi-Engine Land rating first, you save by not having to need to check out in and rent a complex single for the checkride. After you have your commercial, you can take the add-on in any single out there, complex or not, even a Cessna 152, if you want.

3. Get MS flight simulator- This may sound crazy, but the flight simulator software out there for years has been a great way to get exposure to the mechanics of your instrument rating. You don’t need to be in a full motion simulator or even a Frasca to see how to enter a hold or join an airway from a vector. Get comfortable flying a $20 computer simulator, then go to your flight school.

4. Pay cash – If you have the option, offering to pay cash for your flight training could save you and the flight school some money. Credit card transactions typically cost the merchant 2-3% and you can explain that the flight school would actually make more money from you if they can offer you a cash discount.

5. Negotiate - This may or may not work, but you can try. Flight schools want a steady cash flow, so if you can make arrangements to pay up front you can possibly have some of the rental rates reduced. Beware, though, commiting too much money just in case your flight school happens to be hurting more than you think and shuts down before your funds run out.
 

Rez O. Lewshun

Save the Profession
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Skip ERAU/UND and other brand name schools....

Go to community college for two years then transfer to an in state university..... Find an air line pilot who loves to teach at 141 school....
 

brokeflyer

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http://www.pilotbug.com/?p=528

1. Go 141 – If you are starting out from scratch, consider a Part 141 flight school. You can complete your commercial rating in 190 hours vs the 250 hours you would need if you were to train in a regular Part 61 school. The difference is in the curriculum. The FAA has determined that the regimented syllabus approach provided by a 190 hour Part 141 school will produce the same quality of pilot that 250 hours of Part 61 training generates.

2. Comm. AMEL first- By getting your Commercial Multi-Engine Land rating first, you save by not having to need to check out in and rent a complex single for the checkride. After you have your commercial, you can take the add-on in any single out there, complex or not, even a Cessna 152, if you want.

3. Get MS flight simulator- This may sound crazy, but the flight simulator software out there for years has been a great way to get exposure to the mechanics of your instrument rating. You don’t need to be in a full motion simulator or even a Frasca to see how to enter a hold or join an airway from a vector. Get comfortable flying a $20 computer simulator, then go to your flight school.

4. Pay cash – If you have the option, offering to pay cash for your flight training could save you and the flight school some money. Credit card transactions typically cost the merchant 2-3% and you can explain that the flight school would actually make more money from you if they can offer you a cash discount.

5. Negotiate - This may or may not work, but you can try. Flight schools want a steady cash flow, so if you can make arrangements to pay up front you can possibly have some of the rental rates reduced. Beware, though, commiting too much money just in case your flight school happens to be hurting more than you think and shuts down before your funds run out.

1. Become a doctor– Get money and own your own plane

2. Become a Lawyer- Get money and own your own plane

3. Marry a Doctor- Get money and own your own plane

4. Marry a Lawyer– Get money and own your own plane

5. Win the Lottery - Get money and own your own plane

If you wanna make a million bucks in aviation, start with 2 million.
 

Lynxman

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....
My Pt. 141 tuition cost way more than going the 61 route. I received my first half of training by going 141 and finished the rest 61. Not only did I save money, but I have so much more experience than any of my 141 friends. I couldn't disagree with you more OP.
 

Lynxman

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....
Scratch not your idea regardless I believe the 141 route is a waste of valuable money.
 

brokeflyer

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yes 141 is a waste.

Go find an experienced flight instructor. Experienced.....ill say it again, EXPERIENCED.
 

JAFI

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You still get what you paid for...

Go cheap - get cheap

Buy knowledge and work on your ability. A certificate is just a small piece of plastic. You are betting your life that you can back up the claim that you are a pilot.
 

JohnnyP

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Jun 24, 2004
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BAFAN
.....

1. Become a doctor– Get money and own your own plane

2. Become a Lawyer- Get money and own your own plane

3. Marry a Doctor- Get money and own your own plane

4. Marry a Lawyer– Get money and own your own plane

5. Win the Lottery - Get money and own your own plane

If you wanna make a million bucks in aviation, start with 2 million.

How do you think you would have reacted if someone tried to talk you out of aviation when you were younger, told you to just forget it and go be a doc or a lawyer (I know it was different back then)...But you woulda told them to go piss off.......Plus you gotta have some sort of a desire to enter the medical or law field, not just something you do for lack of a better idea because someone told you that you are guaranteed a good life if you do....Those 2 career fields are full of divorces and broken homes just like pilots are....

But I can agree with marrying a doctor or lawyer!......Let them go through all the extra school!!
 

brokeflyer

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How do you think you would have reacted if someone tried to talk you out of aviation when you were younger, told you to just forget it and go be a doc or a lawyer (I know it was different back then)...But you woulda told them to go piss off.......Plus you gotta have some sort of a desire to enter the medical or law field, not just something you do for lack of a better idea because someone told you that you are guaranteed a good life if you do....Those 2 career fields are full of divorces and broken homes just like pilots are....

But I can agree with marrying a doctor or lawyer!......Let them go through all the extra school!!


obviously id feel bad, otherwise i wouldnt've went this route. All I did was answer the question.
 

time builder

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http://www.pilotbug.com/?p=528



3. Get MS flight simulator- This may sound crazy, but the flight simulator software out there for years has been a great way to get exposure to the mechanics of your instrument rating. You don’t need to be in a full motion simulator or even a Frasca to see how to enter a hold or join an airway from a vector. Get comfortable flying a $20 computer simulator, then go to your flight school.
It's not crazy, that little program has saved me thousands.
 

macatstarr

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I thought those were excellent ideas.

I am looking to get back into aviation after 7 years w/ only 100 hrs TT. In todays economy, the best way to pay for flight school now would be to purchase your own plane.
One can purchase a decent IFR Cessna 152/172, grumman cheetah, cheerokee 140 (these are my choices) for around 30K. Being able to finance for 15 to 20 yrs; thats less than $200.00/mo & around $700.00/yr for insurance. A small reserve per our of flight $25/hr per flight hr should more than pay for annuals & if needed the overhaul.

Trade-a-plane.com & barnstormers.com are saturated with a/c @ this price point & really can't be depreciated less than they aready are. youe should be able to get your money back if you want to sell. I think its a no brainer!
Now the only problem is Multi time...
 

Rerouted

What Dream?
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If you want to get in on the cheap, look at the overall location of where you will do your training. Training in a high cost of living (and doing business location) will cost you far more than training in a lower cost area. A good Part 61 school in the midwest will save you a small fortune over CA or the NE metro areas. Whatever you do - make sure you train in a fairly standardized manner with an experienced instructor. No glass in the cockpit - no problem. You'll be paid to learn it later if you pursue a career in the field. Be smart, study hard, and watch the bottom line.
 

JAFI

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I have told this story before but it may fit in here....

I was at a small flight club and a young man walked up to me and asked if I was an Instructor. I said I am an Instructor, but I do not work at this school, I said "can I help you with a question you have". I see what turned out to be his parents walk up behind him as he puffs out his chest and asks: What is the most important license I should get? I looked at him and said "get your real estate license or into a trade you can move around with". He and his parents look at me like I had three heads. I said "You are going to be laid off at least once as a pilot and you need a back up to feed your self". They all walked away.

When I tell this to young pilots they tell me I am cruel. When I tell the story to pilots that have been through the ringer they agree with me.
 

jdubya

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JAFI you are correct. The problem is with public perception. I am amazed at people who do no research before getting into this career. But, when someone has a dream, its really hard to convince them otherwise.

In any case, I have no problem with the original post. Its an honest statement and the guy wasn't looking for a debate on the merits of this career.

So, I went thru a 141 school and think a great instructor is better, not that you can't get that at a 141 school, it just does not mean a lot IMO. I would mention the simulator time going towards the commercial if you have access to that. The only other thing is whatever you do, DO NOT deposit any large amount of money with any flight school.

Good luck!
 

UndauntedFlyer

Ease the nose down
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Learn to fly during or after high school at a local flight school, preferably a Pt. 61 over a Pt 141 program; then, go to college where you can get a job as a CFI.

BTW: It is amazing how many people fall for the idea that some how a person can learn the same in 190 hours under Pt. 141 as they could learn in a Pt. 61 program in 250 hours. Do they think the fancy 4-color ads will do something or that the school will sprinkle magic learning dust over their heads? Give us all a break on this BS that goes on and on and on. The only way to learn to fly is the old fashioned way, more and more experience (hours) behind the wheel. Obviously you'll learn more in 250 hours rather than 190 hours.
 

IBNAV8R

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Jul 3, 2008
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First of all decide if you want to be a Renslow or a Sully.

That's what I thought. Now, don't fall for that "train the airline way" crap. It's BS. There is no substitute for good, old-fashioned stick and rudder skills and experience. Sadly, basic skills have taken a backseat to electronic wizardry, CRM and ever-more-complicated regulations. One of the puppy factories might get you into a cockpit faster but there are no shortcuts to becoming a "pilot".

Find a great instructor - not just a pilot with lots of hours, but one that can explain the complex in simple terms. Actually, find two or three. Don't be afraid to switch instructors or fly with another for part of your training. I also highly recommend a tandem, tailwheel aircraft for all or part of your initial training. You WILL be a better pilot for it.

The best thing you can do to save expenses is to have the resources in place first to complete your goal - be it a private license, instrument rating, commercial, CFI etc. Flying several times a week will save a LOT of coin over flying once or twice a month. Also, make a plan and stick with it. Commit to flying X number of times per day/week and studying X hours per day.

Again, don't look for any shortcuts and whatever you do, don't screw over others to get where you want. You will have to live with the decisions you make and the aviation community is not that big.
 
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