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ZJX & ZMA HI-Sector Cruise Altitudes

westwind driver

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 5, 2004
Posts
147
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&#8730
I have a question regarding cruise altitude and direction of flight with Jacksonville and Miami ARTCC airspace.

Isn't there some rule that northbound flights along the eastern portion of Florida fly odd altitudes? (Talking high altitude flight levels here, FL350, 370, etc)

This has something to do with airspace constraints?

Could someone elaborate further on how aircraft are assign altitudes within ZJX and ZMA?

Thanks!
 

DXR-Beavis

Ummmmmmm, uuhhhhhhhh
Joined
May 20, 2006
Posts
21
Total Time
~250
I have a question regarding cruise altitude and direction of flight with Jacksonville and Miami ARTCC airspace.

Isn't there some rule that northbound flights along the eastern portion of Florida fly odd altitudes? (Talking high altitude flight levels here, FL350, 370, etc)

This has something to do with airspace constraints?

Could someone elaborate further on how aircraft are assign altitudes within ZJX and ZMA?

Thanks!

They have simply turned cardinal flight levels north/south rather than east/west.
This is done throughout Miami Center airspace over/near land in Florida, and JAX Center does it south of approximately a CRG-SZW line. Traffic flow over the Florida penninsula is 99% north/south, and a good number of the routes down there flip-flop between east & west if you're flying on airways.
If you're leaving from the Orlando area or points south going to the northeast, you will generally take odd flight levels the whole way. Going to the Midwest or say Dallas, you will usually have an odd flight level until somewhere around SZW then transition to an even flight level.
This stuff is not published anywhere that I am aware of (maybe ATC letters of agreement).
Further if you look at how the arrivals and departures are built into Orlando and the south Florida airports, you will notice that traffic is set up into corridors to get in/out of each area. Throw in the usual afternoon thunderstorms, and these corridors shift around dynamically allowing them to keep at least some routes open most of the time. Pretty unique environment down there.
 
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