• NC Software is proud to announce the release of APDL - Airline Pilot Logbook version 10.0. Click here to view APDL on the Apple App store and install now.
  • Logbook Pro for Apple iOS version 8.1 is now available on the App Store. Major update including signature endorsements and dark/light theme support. Click here to install now.

WSJ article: AF447.

scoreboardII

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 15, 2008
Posts
2,694
Total Time
xxxxxx
That is not what I said, but go ahead and attack the messenger since you have not else to add. Also, did I ref this accident? no! History is starting to show there's a training problem.
I'm not else to add that can you please show where i called you names or did anything but attack the message?

Also, Ref this message, why are you talking on this topic then if not to ref this message? Clarify next time please.

There is NO training that I know of which requires pilots to perform known pitch and power setting recoveries. None. Until that occurs, let the media blame the pilots all they want, thats the easy out, the reality is, once again, the system is letting the pilots down. They should have had high altitude loss of airspeed, altitude and loss of vertical airspeed information training. My bet is we'll all get to try this in the near future.
 

bubbers44

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2005
Posts
468
Total Time
23000
If it is Airbus training all that will probably be on autopilot. Maybe they should turn the autopilot off and put it in direct law then teach their pilots not to pull back in a stall? It works so well on all other aircraft.
 

DeucesWild

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2006
Posts
92
Total Time
Lots
People keep talking about autothrottles, thunderstorms, CA vs FO, automation, ect. when in reality we need to be asking ourselves a very basic question, "Why is it that when things start going bad in a cockpit, some people insist on pulling the stick back, when the correct response is to push the stick forward?"

This appears to be similar to the Colgan accident, but at altitude. Once the aircraft stalls, the yoke/stick MUST be moved forward.

For as long as people have been flying airplanes, pilots have been dying because they insist on pulling when they should be pushing.

It seems so basic, but airlines are going to have to reevaluate and reinforce how they train not only stall avoidance, but stall RECOVERY. In this accident, it appears that the aircraft stalled with little or no fault of the crew, but the crew failed to correctly RECOVER from the stall once it occurred.
 
Top