• NC Software is proud to announce the release of APDL - Airline Pilot Logbook version 10.0. Click here to view APDL on the Apple App store and install now.

Route over or through the Rockies

msr

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
56
Total Time
4000
Anyone know of a website to find a route or know of a route to go from PDX to STL other than Aopa's website. I am looking for a low altitude route for a single engine airplane. I have the charts but am wondering if there is a prefered route. I have never flown over or through the Rockies. Thanks for any help!!
 

avbug

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 14, 2001
Posts
7,602
Total Time
n/a
Mark,

Two very commonly overlooked aids for the VFR pilot (or the light airplane pilot) are road maps and enroute low altitude IFR charts.

Road maps, especially in mountainous terrain, will give you a quick reference to lower terrain and passes. Highways don't go over mountain peaks; they go between mountains. They're a good reference when planning routes, to be used in conjunction with a sectional or a WAC.

Low Altitude enroute charts give quick references to minimum altitudes along specific routes between navaids, as well as frequencies for use in an emergency. (A low altitude IFR chart may provide the information you need when sitting on a hillside after a forced landing, trying to call for help).

From portand, head toward Boise, then down through Salt Lake City, Grand Junction, and over to Denver. If there is weather, or you don't want to go over the higher country, go south to New Mexico and over. Alternately, you can go from Boise to Rock Springs, with resonably low enroute terrain there. Eastbound from there is straightforward, with relatively flat terrain that keeps getting flatter and lower the farther east you go.

As always, watch your weather, and be prepared to stop and wait it out, if need be. Remember, there are no flights that must be made. Dress warmly, carry some extra supplies (and cash). We're moving into spring time, but many areas along that route are very inhospitable, even for months to come if you need to put the airplane down somewhere. Be prepared. Good luck!!
 

TurboS7

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 25, 2001
Posts
2,261
Total Time
19,210
Years ago I flew that in an Eurcoupe with a 65H.P. engine. Fly through the Columbia gorge to Pendelton from there go to Mountain Home down to Ogden. From Ogden follow the Interstate via Laramie and Rock Springs and Cheyenne. Once you get through the Rockies you are home free. Flight plan to follow the interstates so if you have a problem you have a good place to land. Enjoy it.
 

328dude

Still turning two
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
1,647
Total Time
??????
Years ago took a old 172 with a 6 cylinder Continental over to Vegas from Tulsa. I pretty much followed route 40 all the way there past ABQ and Flagstaff. Was a really nice flight but only flew it during daylight hours.
 

jsoceanlord

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 29, 2001
Posts
367
Total Time
2800
in the late 1980's I flew a citabria westbound in the area of Albuquerque. south of there is even better, depending on your plane. a few years after that I flew a cessna 180 eastbound through a fairly well known pass (by locals) north of boulder CO.

My friend and I were actually stuck circling in a snow covered basin on the western approaches to the mmmmmountains (M's originally a typo, but left for effect). We didn't have the power to climb out - we could've maybe turned back - anyway, my friend finally figured out to apply carb heat. that restored power and we made it over to denver.

the above doesn't adequately convey our pucker factor!

if you contact fbo's near boulder they might know of the pass, etc
 

typhoonpilot

Daddy
Joined
Feb 24, 2002
Posts
1,381
Total Time
17000+
Mark:

You didn't mention what type of airplane this is going to be done in. I am going to assume a single with decent performance. In that case Avbug's post gives good advice , but TurboS7's route is the better one. I would suggest Logan for a stop instead of Ogden if you want to stay away from Class B airspace. The main advantage of this route is, except for a few stretches of high mountain passes, it is relatively flat terrain. Albight, flat terrain with an elevation of 7000 to 8000 feet in places. You wouldn't want to do this route in a fully loaded C-172 in the summer, but a Mooney 201 in the spring would be a piece of cake.
 

ShawnC

Skirts Will Rise
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Posts
1,481
Total Time
-5Z
JCOL,

I can only ponder what was said as the carb heat was applied.
"ohyeahforgotaboutthat" <---Said in under a second.
 

jetdriven

restraint order pending
Joined
Dec 23, 2001
Posts
517
Total Time
6600
that post about following the interstates from boise to salt lake city , rock springs, cheyenne is the way to go. I have done it in a 182 and its pretty flat, just the ground is 8000 feet in places. once you get past cheyenne its smooth sailing from there, just flat terrain. enjoy it.
 

CitationCapt

STILL determined
Joined
Dec 3, 2001
Posts
229
Total Time
8000
Look at this route

This route takes you through MONTANA, away from Class B:

Portland- TR-cities- Spokane (Class C)- Missoula (Northstar Aviation FBO)- Drummond- Helena (Route from Spokane to Helena is almost over I-90), then SE over Canyon Ferry Lake to Bozeman, then through Bozeman Pass to Livingston- Columbus-Billings (Class C) (Lynch Flying Service, FBO)- then SE to Sheridan, Wyoming- east to Gillette, Wyoming- past Devil's Tower- through the Black Hills to Rapid City, SD. From there you are out of the mountains. Most of this entire route is over interstate highways and through mountain passes.

This might take longer, but maybe you'll get a chance to see some mountain goats and elk.
 
Top