• NC Software is having a Black Friday Sale Event thru December 4th on Logbook Pro, APDL - Airline Pilot Logbook, Cirrus Elite Binders, and more. Use coupon code BF2020 at checkout to redeem 15% off your purchase. Click here to shop now.
  • NC Software is proud to announce the release of APDL - Airline Pilot Logbook version 10.0. Click here to view APDL on the Apple App store and install now.

RNP-10 navigation - what is this?

satpak77

Marriott Platinum Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2003
Posts
3,015
Total Time
5000+
Could someone tell me what "RNP-10 navigation requirements" are? Also would a early 90's King Air 350 with Collins avionics meet this?

thanks
 

2000flyer

EASY FLYER
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
1,586
Total Time
5700+
Required Navigation Performance (RNP)
Ongoing development of navigation technology has resulted in a refinement of RNAV called Required Navigation Performance (RNP). RNP is performance- based and not dependent on a specific piece of equipment. It is a statement of navigation position accuracy necessary for operation within a defined airspace. RNP is not new hardware for the cockpit or new navaids. It establishes highly refined parameters for aircraft airspace containment including:

* Navigation performance accuracy, within which the navigation system is expected to remain 95% of the time
* Airspace for continuity and integrity in addition to the 95% area

The combined areas will ensure aircraft containment 99.9% of the time. Navigation performance for a particular RNP type, or number, is related to the size of an area evaluated for aircraft containment.

A descriptive number attached to RNP; e.g. RNP-2 and RNP-3, can be applied to a large region of airspace or to a unique approach procedure. The value is an indicator of the size of the containment area and also defines the navigation equipment an aircraft must have to operate in that airspace. In the United States , different RNP values can be assigned for terminal approach procedures, departure procedures and en route operations. For instance, terminal area approach procedures require very precise navigation and much smaller containment area (RNP value) within which the aircraft must remain while landing on a particular runway. En route airspace requires less finite navigation, and therefore larger containment areas to ensure track-to-track separation from other routes.

Expected RNP Benefits
By refining navigation system performance and airspace containment to a 99.999% certainty, maximum benefit can be derived from RNP. The accurate, repeatable path, integrity and continuity ensure procedures will be flown in the same manner by all aircraft. Controllers can then expect aircraft to be at a specific position with a high degree of confidence, thus maximizing safety and the efficient flow of aircraft through airspace. This improved containment will be used to refine obstacle evaluation when developing routes and procedures. Other benefits are:

* Reduced route separation resulting in increased airspace capacity and efficiency
* Improved obstacle clearance limits
* Lower landing weather minimums
* Reduced pilot and controller workload
* More “fly direct to” capability and capacity
 

ATCER

I have revised routing...
Joined
Sep 3, 2002
Posts
173
Total Time
500
At first look I thought you might be joking... but I do realize that all these types of equipment can be confusing. You will only find RNP-10 on the top of the line tras oceanic aircraft, actually trans pacific a/c. The 744, 772, A343's. etc would be about it. I know little about equipping an a/c but I would be about 100% sure that a king air could NOT be equipped nor would it need to be.

Just out of curiosity... where did you here about RNP-10 ?
 

2000flyer

EASY FLYER
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
1,586
Total Time
5700+
ATCER said:
At first look I thought you might be joking... but I do realize that all these types of equipment can be confusing. You will only find RNP-10 on the top of the line tras oceanic aircraft, actually trans pacific a/c. The 744, 772, A343's. etc would be about it. I know little about equipping an a/c but I would be about 100% sure that a king air could NOT be equipped nor would it need to be.

Just out of curiosity... where did you here about RNP-10 ?

Well, not exactly. Most Falcons comply, as do Gulfstreams, Challengers, Globals, etc. RNP-XX isn't based on the size of the aircraft, but the navigation equipment installed. While RNP accuracy isn't much of an issue in the states, yet, it is becoming more so in the EU. BRNAV, or "Basic Area Navigation" has an RNP value of 5. This includes US operators flying in Europe. I've seen several light jets and King Airs with US registration in Europe and I'm sure they are bound by the RNP 5 (BRNAV) requirements.

Here is a link, http://www.ponceby.com/plane.htm, of a 1974 King Air E90 that is capable of RNP-5/10. Remember, it's the equipment, not the aircraft.

2000Flyer
 

Rick1128

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 10, 2002
Posts
919
Total Time
22000+
RNP-10 refers to Oceanic Navigation standards (primarily for the Pcific) for long range navigation systems. While aircraft in Europe may meet RNP-5 or B-RNAV the units may not meet or be certified for RNP-10 operations. Depending on what equipment is in the aircraft it may or may not meet these standards. For the US I believe it is refered to in the aircraft supplement as TSO-129A or C. Some panel mounted GPS's meet these standards, like the Apollo 2101, Trimble 2101 and the King KN-90B.
 

ATCER

I have revised routing...
Joined
Sep 3, 2002
Posts
173
Total Time
500
2000flyer said:
Well, not exactly. Most Falcons comply, as do Gulfstreams, Challengers, Globals, etc. RNP-XX isn't based on the size of the aircraft, but the navigation equipment installed. While RNP accuracy isn't much of an issue in the states, yet, it is becoming more so in the EU. BRNAV, or "Basic Area Navigation" has an RNP value of 5. This includes US operators flying in Europe. I've seen several light jets and King Airs with US registration in Europe and I'm sure they are bound by the RNP 5 (BRNAV) requirements.

Here is a link, http://www.ponceby.com/plane.htm, of a 1974 King Air E90 that is capable of RNP-5/10. Remember, it's the equipment, not the aircraft.

2000Flyer

Yes... I understand RNP/Equipment. That is why my question still is... why RNP-10 on a King Air ? RNP-10 is only required in the US on the Trans-Pacific Flex Track System. This is so ATC can use 50NM seperation between A/C in the non-radar oceanic environment. Lets even assume a King Air could get to the flight levels to fly in RNP-10 airpsace (it begins at FL310) he would be flying where the slowest A/C is at M.80. At NY Oceanic in MNPS airspace we only use 60 miles and that is RNP-12.6. In training last year we were told we will be eventually going to RNP-10 but part of the holdup are the airlines, it is expensive. Sure, they have fleets of A/C to upgrade but the price per plane was in the 6 figures. Not to mention the crews need to be certified on the equipment.
 
Top