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"Restricted" Airworthiness Certificate?

ShyFlyGuy

Major Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Posts
540
Total Time
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I have a friend who has an aircraft, listed below (with select information changed). The most curious part of it is the bottom two lines. What does this mean? How can we get it changed to "Normal"? For the record, there is no modification to the airframe or anything to make it "Restricted." Your help is appreciated.

N-number : N12345
Aircraft Serial Number : 28-0000000
Aircraft Manufacturer : PIPER
Model : PA28-151
Engine Manufacturer : LYCOMING
Model : 0-320 SERIES
Aircraft Year : 1974
Owner Name :
FIRST LAST
Owner Address :
123 FIRST STREET
TOWN, LA, 12345
Type of Owner : Individual
Registration Date : 05-Aug-2002
Airworthiness Certificate Type : Restricted
Approved Operations : Aerial Surveying


Yours,

Shy
 

avbug

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Dec 14, 2001
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A restricted airworthiness certificate may be issued for several reasons, which can include the type of operation, or the operating limitations or circumstances of the airplane.

Many of the airplanes I've flown have been restricted category aircraft. In some cases, that's the way they were born; they'll always be restricted category, but in other cases, they have been put in the restricted category because they were military aircraft without typical certification data or documentation, modified aircraft which had been substantially changed, or were being operated under conditions or in ways that did not lend to normal certification.

Taking an airplane out of one category and placing it in another is as simple as applying for a new airworthiness certificate, provided the aircraft meets all the requirements for the airworthiness certification you're seeking. Those requirements include it's type certification, the intended operation, and of course, it's present condition...which must meet all the type certification data for the airworthiness category in which you intend to place the airplane.

In this case, if you're seeking normal airworthiness certification, with no airframe modifications, you should have no problem merely making application for a new airworthiness certificate.

The airworthiness certificate in the aircraft now should spell out the limitations for the airplane (it should be on the back of the certificate). Typical restrictions may include what airports you can use (often restricted from using airports where there is scheduled service, for example), restrictions from using airways, flight over populated areas, crew requirements, etc.
 

ShyFlyGuy

Major Member
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Nov 13, 2002
Posts
540
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AvBug, you are so smart, and you always have the answers. I should just start PMing you with my questions just to cut to the chase. I'm going to check out the Airworthiness Certificate and see what the requirements are. Hopefully we have not been flying in violation of any of those restrictions (as mentioned above, it is for Arial Surveying). Thank you sir.

Shy
 

propsarebest

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Sep 24, 2004
Posts
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....
Double check the actual A.C.-

We had a B200 Kingair that the FAA listed online as restricted but it wasn't. the online thingee also listed surveying too.

Could be just a mistake in the online stuff.
 

ShyFlyGuy

Major Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Posts
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Oh yeah... That's a pretty good idea. Thanks!I still say AvBug is very, very smart... like a hairy little Budda.Shy
 
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