Proving Runs

livin'thesim

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I'm looking for input about proving runs for a Citation.
We have read all the FAA guidance, and we feel we're ready, but I would like any last-minute bits of wisdom from people who have been through this process.

Any good tips or ideas about how to make it go smoothly?

Thanks.
 

bizjet800

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I have not done this personally, but they will mess with you. I have heard they will pass a note to the captain or co-pilot that reads, "They other pilot has just passed out and is not available." Then they will see what you do. It's really just a rite of passage by the FAA--assuming you know what you are doing. I would try very hard to find out from others who have used your examiner in the past and find out what they did. Good luck!
 

Basil

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I've done both proving runs for a new certificate and "validation" flights for the addition of another type to that certificate.

We carried our POI, PMI, PAI, FAA "resource" on the type (their expert), as well as a POI-in-training. Basically, we had to show how we knew we had an airworthy aircraft, could follow 135, and handle unexpected events. Every scenario was delivered on a post-it note. Between legs, they would introduce a mx problem to ensure that we knew the steps to have items fixed when away from base. We also did approaches at every airport. They didn't mess with us too much during the flight, and the most stressful part was the mx hoops, made worse by our long-winded company procedures, combined with real mx issues.

Feel free to PM me with any specific questions you have.

It goes without saying, but know your Company Manual, OpSpecs, and 135...and be able to apply it to the flights. And do not rush through things...always consult the book!
 
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Cat3C

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proving runs

I have had the "pleasure" of completing 2 sets of proving runs - CE650 and CL601. Good times.

After several meetings and the appropriate paperwork has been completed, ops manuals, etc the runs are scheduled. In the 601 we had a plane full of inspectors from the local FSDO and 1 FAA 601 expert. The inspectors were maintenance, avionics, ops, and whoever else felt like going for a plane ride for a couple days.
Day 1 night flight to KAPA and then return to base. During vectors FAA passed a note card to me with a discrepency (braking issue if I recall). Basically how do you handle the failure and what is the maintenance procedure, etc. After landing we made the appropriate calls to our DOM, paperwork, etc. Ate a quick bite and returned to our base. Enroute they passed a note saying there was some sort of smoke issue in the cabin of some sort and we ran the appropriate procedures and diverted to a landing. More pretend paperwork and uneventfull return to base. Next day after the appropriate rest (they wanted to leave earlier as a test), we left to OK City. We had a "passenger" that was blind and needed to handle that as needed. Enroute to destination we had a wx divert to a landing with a gear issue - again note cards were passed to the cockpit. Handled that as needed and dropped 1 pax off - returned to base. Proving run completed and paperwork issued within a day or so. Looking back it was sort of fun - similar in intensity to a LOFT perhaps. Always flew with seat belt sign on as a to keep "them " sitting down FWIW. In the end it was pretty straight forward.

Hope it helps - it was a bunch of years ago.
 

Capt1124

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Not a big deal. All they want to know is given a situation, that you can handle it properly according to your own manuals. No point in having all that paper if you can't apply it to a real world situation.

Check or ask them about any bags they bring on board. Give a *good* passenger briefing, this is very important.
 

Basil

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That's a good point about the bags. Our guys tried to "smuggle" Hazmat aboard. Ask them what they have in there or even inspect it yourself.

Also they wanted very detailed briefings. Have them all follow along on their briefing cards as you do the preflight briefing. Also, give a pre-landing briefing via PA, and look back carefully to make sure they have stowed carry-on lugggage, have seatbelts fastened, headrests extended in the rear-facing seats, etc.
 

G100driver

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What a farcking waste of time and money these things are. I always thought that it would be best to pile in a van and drive around and pretend it was the airplane.

You could drive to a local airport, pentend the van was and an airplane and pretend to find out how to fix it! All while annoying the crap out of FBO that the van pulled into. It is really no different than wha you are doing in the aiplane, except you are flying holes into the sky at $1500/hour.
 
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