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NTSB reviews jet's skid landing at O'Hare

firstthird

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presumably there is more to this than meets the eye in this story.

http://www.usatoday.com/travel/flights/2008-10-23-NTSB-OHare_N.htm

By Alan Levin, USA TODAY


The pilots of an American Airlines flight carrying 185 passengers were forced to make an unusual emergency landing last month in Chicago with limited ability to control the jet after they lost electrical power, according to newly released information from a federal investigation.


The Boeing 757 skidded off a runway at O'Hare International Airport on Sept. 22, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said. Although none of the 192 people aboard was injured, the pilots flew on backup battery power for long beyond the 30 minutes that their emergency handbook said the batteries would last, the NTSB said.



The pilots of the Seattle-to-New York flight drained the jet's battery backup system, leaving inoperable vital systems that help stop a jet, according to a preliminary report released this week.



The pilots told investigators they had difficulty raising and lowering the jet's nose and felt they had only one chance to land, the NTSB said.


"They should have landed as soon as practical," said Michael Barr, an instructor at the University of Southern California's Aviation Safety and Security Program. "That would have been the conservative approach. I don't see why they thought they could fly all the way across country on their backup electrical system."


The pilots had switched to battery power shortly after leaving Seattle when electrical problems developed. The batteries last for about 30 minutes, but the pilots continued toward their destination until the jet's electrical systems began failing about an hour and 40 minutes later.


The need to land as soon as possible when aircraft systems begin to fail has been reinforced by several accidents, such as Swiss Air Flight 111 in 1998, Barr said. The Swiss Air pilots attempted to diagnose where smoke was coming from before deciding to divert, Canadian investigators concluded. The jet became engulfed in fire and crashed off Nova Scotia, killing all 229 people aboard.



Last month, the American Airlines pilots had to stop the jet without thrust reversers and other devices that help a jet stop, the NTSB said. The electrical system failure was so complete that the pilots were unable to shut off the engines after they came to a stop, the report said.



Barr said investigators will want to know what the airline's manuals and emergency documentation instructed pilots to do, what the airline's maintenance department advised the pilots to do and how pilots were trained to handle electrical malfunctions.



American and its pilots union, the Allied Pilots Association, declined to comment while the case is under investigation.
 

Jonny Sacko

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Hmm, I wonder if there was any cars at the end of that runway, don't you? Well, maybe you don't, but the rest of the industry does. You are a poser, just like the USA today.
 

vixin

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JS
I really dont think you want to go their. Lets just leave that stupid post alone.
 

Soverytired

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Does anyone really think a highly trained AA crew would fly on battery power only for 90+ minutes just to try and get to their overnight hotel?

USA Today strikes again. There's more to the story, but only a tiny portion of the flying public will ever hear it.

What a rag.
 

firstthird

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There's more to the story, but only a tiny portion of the flying public will ever hear it.
That was my sole point in posting it. It doesn't really make sense to me and was wondering if maybe there is a problem with the manual or procedures that other people flying Boeings might be interested in. Much like our MDW accident brought to light industry-wide problems with landing calculations and braking report readings, must of which still aren't fixed and are waiting to bite the next guys that have a distance critical ladning.

Johnny Sacko, real classy. Sorry that you can't discuss incidents and safety related items without getting personal and dragging in recent fatalities. (p.s. not really sure what you consider a 'poser.' I posted a recent news story and was wondering what other professional pilots thought. what about you? do you think most professional pilots want to go around comparing their companies latest fatal accident.)

Stuff happens. Either we learn from it or we don't. Like Soverytired said, only a few will ever hear the real story. unfortunately, most pilots won't hear it either. companies and the FAA are so afraid of lawyers that valid, safety complaints get buried rather than fixed or publicized to pilots so the rest of us can avoid the same mistake.
 
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