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Masters degrees?

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I have a Juris Doctorate and played attorney for 6 years and missed flying so much I left a very sucessful partnership to fly boxes. At least the boxes don't complain too much or want to sue everything in sight. I am glad I have something outside of Aviation I can fall back on. I don't knock the aviation masters programs which are great to stay in aviation should you loose your medical when aviation times are good. If times are tough like now it is not only pilots in the aviation field that find thier jobs in jeopardy. During slow times I will speculate there are a lot of aviation masters degrees looking to stay in the airline industry which may not be hiring anyone during the tough times. My recommendation is if you have an aviation degree and still want a masters get something that interests you outside of aviation. If you look at airline websites they advertise for general masters degrees such as a MBA's ect... With the aviation undergrad they should still favor you in hiring, all things being equal. Leaving your options open to the most possibilities appears to be the wise decision in my humble opinion. Bottom line its your decision. Live life to the fullest. I'll stop rambling. Two years ago I was charging $125.00 per hour now I'm down to $0.02 but having a blast.

KlingonLRDRVR
 
My impression based on this forum is that a Master's Degree would not necessarily help you get the job compared to other people who have just bachelor's degrees. But assuming that you are the recruiter for the airline, and you are interviewing tens of applicants who have approximately equal flight hours, would it not make sense that a person who has just the same flight hours like the rest and has a Master's degree might stand out in the crowd?
 
I am working on my masters right now in Economics. While the school doesn't have a aviation program, their letting me do it with a transportation emphasis on aviation. I am working on my thesis with a study on Asian Economic Development and Airlines. I don't really expect it to help me too much when it comes to hiring, but it is interesting and it is always something that I've wanted to do.
 
Masters in Management, Thesis on Statistical Analysis and Quality Contol.

Unfortunately, my MS got me off the flightline in the AF. My first CC made O-6 by pawning me off to the wing to set up a TQM program (aarrgghh!).

I don't use the degree much, but I certainly enjoy using the information.
 
MSF; Masters of Science in Finance. Used some of the knowledge in my old desk job and a little to help out my current employer. Nice to have to fall back on. Regardless of the field of study, if it is a program that pushes the students, has good professors, you'll walk away a better person after completing it. Some of the classes were ballbusters but fantastic learning experiences. Met some great people in the program I was in who are now good friends of mine.


Mr. I.


P.S. A number of morons in each program keep the boring topics in class interesting:p
 
Master's

swc12nap1 said:
[A]ssuming that you are the recruiter for the airline, and you are interviewing tens of applicants who have approximately equal flight hours, would it not make sense that a person who has just the same flight hours like the rest and has a Master's degree might stand out in the crowd?
Not necessarily. The difference-breaker may be a four-year degree v. no degree. A Master's won't help much; in fact, I've heard that a Master's is a turn-off to some recruiters because they don't like pilots with too much education, and all that too much education might imply.

All you really need is a four-year degree, from an accredited school, of course. The best major, i.e. Aeronautical Science v. something else, is a long-running subject of conjecture.
 
MS in Chemical Engineering and an MBA.
Used to use them a lot, now it is soley for idiot identification.
 
Just about finished with a Masters in International Relations - area of concentration is National Security. If we (ACA) get bought out by MESA, I am sure I will be using it......
 
I remember watching some video on Delta Airlines' pilots a few years back and, when explaining the selection process, a HR rep for the airline stated that points are awarded to candidates based on qualifications. Some of the ones that stood out in my head were 2 "points" for an undergrad degree, 4 points for landing an airplane on an aircraft carrier (at night, in poor weather), and 6 points for a graduate degree.

If the video and my recollection are accurate. it would seem that Delta values a graduate degree during the pilot selection.
 

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