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Left or Right seat-PIC?

trol1374

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I'm curious as to if there is a rule regarding if the "PIC" has to sit in the left seat of a GA plane (ie 172,182 ect). If a pilot is in the left seat, and a pilot in the right seat and the right seater wanted practice flying in the right seat, agrees to be PIC and does the entire takeoff and landing from the right seat. This being done as prep for CFI. Is there any regulation regarding if a "pilot" has to be in the left seat if a non CFI pilot is in the right seat? Note again: the right seater is a NON CFI.

Thanks in advance
 

aeronautic1

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trol1374 said:
I'm curious as to if there is a rule regarding if the "PIC" has to sit in the left seat of a GA plane (ie 172,182 ect). If a pilot is in the left seat, and a pilot in the right seat and the right seater wanted practice flying in the right seat, agrees to be PIC and does the entire takeoff and landing from the right seat. This being done as prep for CFI. Is there any regulation regarding if a "pilot" has to be in the left seat if a non CFI pilot is in the right seat? Note again: the right seater is a NON CFI.

Thanks in advance

If you are certificate in category and class and you are manipulating the controls, then it matters not what seat you are in.
 

mattpilot

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aeronautic1 said:
If you are certificate in category and class and you are manipulating the controls, then it matters not what seat you are in.

Correct .....unless the manufacture specifies a PIC seat in the AFM. Cessna does not for its singles.
 

nosehair

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trol1374 said:
If a pilot is in the left seat, and a pilot in the right seat and the right seater wanted practice flying in the right seat, agrees to be PIC and does the entire takeoff and landing from the right seat.

Yes...Get in that right seat now...a major portion of your commercial training should be in the right seat...that's where you're gonna start most of your commercial jobs, as fllight instructor or co-pilot.
...aaand, you don't hafta have a pilot in the left seat. You can fly solo or carry a passenger in the left seat.
 

midlifeflyer

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Other than the seat-specific limitation that matt mentioned, be aware that there are sometimes insurance issues and club rules on the issue. That an FAR issue but something to consider.
 

BLing

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nosehair said:


Yes...Get in that right seat now...a major portion of your commercial training should be in the right seat...that's where you're gonna start most of your commercial jobs, as fllight instructor or co-pilot.



Doesnt matter, the plane flys the same regardless of which seat you are at. It takes like one flight to get used to it. But it wouldnt hurt to get into the right seat now.
 

mattpilot

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BLing said:
Doesnt matter, the plane flys the same regardless of which seat you are at. It takes like one flight to get used to it. But it wouldnt hurt to get into the right seat now.

Flying the 152 did feel the same left or right. Doing it in the 172RG feels a little bit more different. I make more errors in the RG than in the 152 (right seat that is). I guess it has something to do with sitting further from the longitudinal axis since the RG is a bit wider.
 

midlifeflyer

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How long did it take for you to get comfortable in the right seat?" is a bit like "How long did it take you to solo." People and different so the adjustment to the view can take different lengths of time. Some do it quicker; others slower. Hardly matters.
 

BOOYA

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nosehair said:


Yes...Get in that right seat now...a major portion of your commercial training should be in the right seat...that's where you're gonna start most of your commercial jobs, as fllight instructor or co-pilot.
...aaand, you don't hafta have a pilot in the left seat. You can fly solo or carry a passenger in the left seat.


Never thought of this, what do you have your students do for a checkride? Fly in the right seat?

if so, do the examiners give them a hard time?
 

nosehair

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BOOYA said:
what do you have your students do for a checkride? Fly in the right seat?

Talk with your local examiner...it's up to him which seat he will fly. It is becoming more acceptable for examiners to see this request.
 

Fly_Chick

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My flight school's renter's agreement requires that the renter fly in the left seat (perhaps because traditionally pilots earning their ratings always fly in the left seat). If an instructor is on board, the student can often request to fly right seat. I think this is a good idea, as it gives them another perspective.

Once, while waylayed for weather, my student asked if I would fly the leg back home (it was late and we were on the ground for hours waiting). I agreed, and my student told me he would move our headsets so I could fly the left seat. It hit me like a brick that I took so much for granted, and the student actually thought the person flying had to fly the left seat.

Your confidence will increase with the knowledge that you can fly either seat, so will your understanding of cockpit layout, and the function of each of the items on the panel. You will become more precise with your flying. Another benefit is you will be better able to more quickly know where everything in the plane is located, thus reducing your workload.
 

GravityHater

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Just make sure to really do that brake check right after startup! (not all have em on the right)
 

Goose Egg

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GravityHater said:
Just make sure to really do that brake check right after startup! (not all have em on the right)

I did part of my CFI in an older Arrow II, and there were no toe brakes on the right side. I had to use the parking brake.

-Goose
 

Snakum

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When I first started flying right seat (King Air) I was all over the map on approach and landing. It took me at least four trips/approaches to get a handle on it. The site picture was all wonky. I flew a light single from the right the other day, for the first time, and it felt natural.

Now I get wigged flying on the left. :D

Minh
 

TankerDriver

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I remember it taking quite a few flights during my CFI training to get used to flying from the right seat. Probably 8-10 hours or so. For the most part, the issue will be learning how to use your right hand for the yoke and the left for the throttle. As simple as it may seem, untraining your brain after doing something for 200 hours or so, is not so easy. As for manuevers, I would say the most difficult ones will be steep turns, traffic patterns (left handers) and landing on centerline (a biggie). Once you master it though, you'll never want to go back to the left seat.

After I had been CFI'ing for a while, whenever I took a plane up for leisure, whether I was alone or with a passenger, I sat in the right seat. I didn't feel comfortable back in the left seat.

And... when you really want to pucker yourself, try having to shoot an ILS down to minimums with a private pilot student in the left seat and you in the right after unexpected fog rolls in. It's not so fun without having the instruments right in front of you (and I only had about 450 hours).
 
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mattpilot

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I agree, the steep turns are the hardest manouvers to do on the right seat. ;)
 

Fly_Chick

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TankerDriver said:
And... when you really want to pucker yourself, try having to shoot an ILS down to minimums with a private pilot student in the left seat and you in the right after unexpected fog rolls in. It's not so fun without having the instruments right in front of you (and I only had about 450 hours).

Tank, I found it much easier to fly instruments from the right seat. Because I sit further away from the instruments in the right seat, my scan is better. I do not have to move my head as much for my eyes to see all of the instruments, meaning I can usually keep all of the instruments in my scan without moving my head (unless of course I am flying a classic, then the instruments are installed anywhere on the panel where there is an available slot).
 

cshelton

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Start flying in the right seat as much as possible to get comfortable for your CFI. I did a lot of my commercial training in the right seat and by the time I started my CFI, the right seat felt the same as the left seat. There is no FAR that says what seat you have to fly in. The manufacter may specify a pic seat; as long as you can fly the plane saftley and manipulate the controls from the other seat then go for it. Good luck on the CFI.
 
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