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King Air Signoff question!!!

femflyr

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abunch
Does anyone know how it works to get a King Air signoff. Its a B-100 and the pilot has over 400 hours in it. He wants to get his commerical in it and wants to be signed off. Those anyone know what the checkride is going to inculde?
 

HappyFlying

Cessna 150 Captain
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The B100 is less than 12,500 pounds and doesn't require a type rating. If the person already has a multi rating with high performance, high altitude, and complex endorsements the "sign off" is more of an insurance issue if it is part 91. The 300 series King Air requires a type rating but the 100 and 90s do not.
The Practical Test Standards will be the same for the B100 as it would be in an Apache. The drawback is the King Air has a bunch of systems and stuff you'll be expected to demonstate knowledge about since that is the aircraft you are providing for the checkride. That sounds like a bit of overkill to take a King Air for a commercial checkride. I have quite a bit of B100 time and I can tell you some of the elements required are a handfull in it. I wouldn't want to foot the bill for the fuel either.
If you don't already have a multi-rating then the easiest way to go is to do the single commercial first. Then you only have to demonstrate commercial level knowledge and keep your headings, altitudes, airspeeds within commercial limits (+/-5 degrees, 50 feet and 5 knots) during the plain old multi ride. You will have to shoot a few approaches also to be able to fly multi instrument stuff.
I hope this helps.
 

tarp

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Walter Mitty Dream #2

Y'all know about Walter Mitty dreams right.

The first would be that as a passenger on 747 or A-340, the flight attendant frantically runs back through the cabin. BOTH the pilot and FO ate the fish and are now keeled over the controls. Can anybody fly the plane?

The second is you are a lowly CFI sitting in the FBO when this well-heeled customer walks in. He (or she) comes up to you and says that flying was always a dream. He(or she) went ahead and bought that shiny new King Air sitting out on the ramp because this guy's buddies said it was the best plane to get. Can you give instruction?

OK, pinch me. I'd love to give you instruction in the B-100! But the commercial multi sure would be easier in a PA-44.
 

bobbysamd

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Commercial King Air checkride

The Commercial-Multi PTS states everything your student needs to know and do and what you need to know and do to get rated.

Don't forget that not all examiners are qualified to give multi rides in every multi. Be sure you have an examiner lined up who can give King Air rides before you start working with your student. It may be that none of the examiners in your area can give King Air practicals and you'd have to send him to the FAA. And, notwithstanding a lot of opinion that the FAA is tougher than DEs, the FAA is harder to schedule.

Remember, too, that the insurance company and not the FAA is the true arbiter and regulator of flight qualifications. You would have to get on the airplane's insurance to instruct your student. Do you have enough time yourself to get on the insurance. Will your student have enough PIC time to be insured?

Speaking of "practical," wouldn't it be more practical for your student just to get his multi in a Seminole or something? Probably for the price of Jet-A for one or two King Air flights he could pay for enough Seminole time to earn his rating.

I realize that getting maybe 10 to 20 hours of King Air time is a major temptation to train this guy in his airplane, but it won't make much different to you in the long run when compared against the hoops through which you must jump to get there.

Just my .02.
 
Last edited:

Timebuilder

Entrepreneur
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>>Walter Mitty Dream #2

I'll bet most of us have had those two dreams, particularly number one!

Sitting around the school, I kept hoping that someone would buy a new Baron and want me to teach him how to fly it...
 

femflyr

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Jun 16, 2002
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abunch
Thanks for your response.
I'm still debating on if I should sign him off or not. I don't even know why he decided to get his private multi and jumped straight into a king air!!!!!

Thanks again
 

bigsky

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Just curious what your student received his multi-private in? It does sound like if he has already has 400 hours in the plane he should not have any real problems considering he is a decent stick. Also sounds like money is not too much of an issue. If he has been only flying the king air he would probably have more difficultly flying an a.s.e.l( I know I sure would)on the check ride anyways. I would think that you would use the same pts and the same criteria to decide if he is proficient as you would in a light twin.
 
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