How difficult is it to get a DE and give checkrides?

Dangerkitty

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 21, 2004
Posts
1,353
Total Time
8700
I was talking to a buddy of mine the other day that wanted to bring in a little extra cash. He has quite a bit of experience instructing in the military as well as doing some civilian instruction (even though his CFI is now expired).

That got me to thinking. How difficult is it to get a DE endorsement from the Fed's? I seem to remember seeing the requirements in the regs awhile back but I can't seem to locate them now. Anyone wanna chime in?
 

NuGuy

Ex-Commuter
Joined
May 30, 2003
Posts
2,375
Total Time
10000
Heyas DK,

Actually, the biggest requirement for being a DE is good political skills.

There are actually hour requirements, but they are pretty minimal if you've been a professional pilot any (although I have known DEs who never flew for hire). Depending on the designation (PVT, IR, COM, ATP), from what I remember they start around 3000 TT, with 2000 PIC and 1500 or so dual given and go up with the more advanced designation. But that's the easy part. One of the requirements is that you have a proven record of leadership and service to the aviation community at large where you are.

To apply, you go to your local FSDO, and let them know. Then, if you get selected, you take the written test. If you pass, you go into BIG pool of applicants for one or two years. When your local FSDO needs a DE, they go to this pool, and pull a name out. It's not first come first served, or even by quals or test scores. The FSDO looks at the list and picks the person they want.

To get picked you really have to make a name for yourself, in a good way, with the local feds. It's a long, long road, especially for the run of the mill designations, like PVT or IR in airplanes. But you have to start somewhere, so have your buddy goto the FSDO and sign up to be a Aviation Safety Counsellor. Its not a bad gig (no pay involved), but it gets you known around the FSDO. Volunteering to do the WINGS programs the FSDO puts on also isn't a bad deal either.

If someone is looking for some "extra cash", forget it. Its a big deal.

Nu
 

WMUchickenhawk

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 12, 2005
Posts
197
Total Time
900
I asked my DE when I got my PP, he said that if you scored less than a 95 on any of the writtens, you could count yourself out. It does seem like a good way to make cash though. Especially if you do it in an area with a large aviation college.
 

PacoPollo

MILF HUNTER
Joined
Apr 17, 2003
Posts
627
Total Time
Lots
Dangerkitty said:
I was talking to a buddy of mine the other day that wanted to bring in a little extra cash. He has quite a bit of experience instructing in the military as well as doing some civilian instruction (even though his CFI is now expired).

That got me to thinking. How difficult is it to get a DE endorsement from the Fed's? I seem to remember seeing the requirements in the regs awhile back but I can't seem to locate them now. Anyone wanna chime in?
You shouldnt have any problems getting in based on your curriculum,plus being ex AA pilot that should put you ahead from all other applicants.....
 

Immelman

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 10, 2002
Posts
324
Total Time
340
A buddy of mine became one. Combination of factors: he is a great leader/mentor, would do things like put on wings seminars for the local pilots, had corporate + military + CFI experience. He started his own small pt 61 flight school and ran a clean operation. Finally, the only other DE in the area (within 100 miles or so) got out of the business and so there was a regional need.
 

Dangerkitty

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 21, 2004
Posts
1,353
Total Time
8700
PacoPollo said:
You shouldnt have any problems getting in based on your curriculum,plus being ex AA pilot that should put you ahead from all other applicants.....
Once again Paco not only can you not type in proper English and coherent sentences but it seems you have trouble with reading as well.

You might wanna stop posting. With every post you continue to show everyone on this board what a complete and total dumbass you are.

I asked you a question in the regional forum. Why don't you have the balls to answer?
 

IFLYHI

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2002
Posts
52
Total Time
10,000
I became a designated examiner about 9 years ago, so some of what I am going to say may have changed slightly.

First, you need to fill out an application, and send it to the National Examiner Board. The application can be found here:

http://forms.faa.gov/forms/faa8710-10.pdf

You don't need to have any contact with the local FSDO prior to applying, but it certainly might help once you get a little farther along the process.

I was going to try and paraphrase the rest of the process, but it is spelled out right in the application. Here is the meat of it:


WHAT HAPPENS TO YOUR APPLICATION--
The National Examiner Board (NEB) will evaluate your application to ensure that you meet the selection criteria for the designation(s) sought. The NEB will advise you, in writing, whether or not you meet the applicable selection criteria. If the NEB sends you a letter stating you do not meet the selection criteria, do NOT take the predesignation knowledge test.

If the NEB sends you a letter stating you do meet the selection criteria, you will be directed to take the examiner predesignation knowledge test appropriate to the designation(s) sought. For example: airplane (PEA), rotorcraft (PER), glider (PEG), and balloon (PEB). You may take the examiner predesignation knowledge test at any FAA-approved computerized testing center. Request the pilot examiner predesignation knowledge test for the category applicable to the designation(s) sought. You MUST forward the original test results to the NEB within 10 days of the date you take the examiner predesignation knowledge test. Keep a copy of the test results for your personal records. Upon receiving your original test results with a score of 80 percent or higher, the NEB will notify you of approval or disapproval for assignment to the national examiner candidate pool. The NEB will forward only die top three ranking candidates within the national examiner candidate pool to each FSDO that requests a new designee. If you are selected, you must be available to serve the entire FSDO area. The NEB keeps your application in the national examiner candidate pool for 2 years or until a FSDO selects you, whichever comes first.
After 2 years, the NEB win delete the applications of all candidates not selected by a FSDO from the national examiner candidate pool. An applicant must repeat the application process in order to apply for reassignment to the national examiner candidate pool.
Read the application completely and that should answer most of the questions.




 
Last edited:

Dangerkitty

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 21, 2004
Posts
1,353
Total Time
8700
IFLYHI said:
I became a designated examiner about 9 years ago, so some of what I am going to say may have changed slightly.

First, you need to fill out an application, and send it to the National Examiner Board. The application can be found here:

http://forms.faa.gov/forms/faa8710-10.pdf

You don't need to have any contact with the local FSDO prior to applying, but it certainly might help once you get a little farther along the process.

I was going to try and paraphrase the rest of the process, but it is spelled out right in the application. Here is the meat of it:

Read the application completely and that should answer most of the questions.
IFLYHI,

Thanks for the info. That is exactly the info I was looking for. I will pass it along to my buddy and I know the stuff you have provided will help him make a much more informed decision on whether or not to pursue this endeavor.

Once again thanks for all your insight.

DK
 
Top