helpful navigation websites?

cforst513

Giggity giggity goo!!!
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for all of you CFI's out there, i was wondering if you might know of any websites out there that could help me when trying to use a nav log to plot a cross country. i'm talking about having to find wind correction angles, density altitude, and all the other things that need to be filled in on a nav log. i would just like more practice doing it. i asked my CFI and he's going to try and make something for me, but it might take a few days. do you know of any helpful websites out there that could help me practice?
 

moxiepilot

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easiest thing to help your self is to put a sectional on the wall, take two darts and throw them at it. take the airport each dart is closest to and voila, there's your x-c.

pick an altitude, pull up the winds online and fill out your x-c with that info. have your instructor look it over.

there is no substitute for practice - you're not going to have the computer in the air when you need to divert or to see if your numbers are matching up.

sorry to get on a soap box, but don't rely on anything other than yourself before you go for the gadgets.

it's the same concept as learning to fly by pilotage & dead reconing before using gps. anyone can go gps direct, but what do you do when that chunks out?
 

Flechas

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I second moxie, come up with your own X-C and practice a lot.
 
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EDIT: Moved this part to the top of my post, as it is the most useful to you:

=====================================

After quickly skimming through this in depth 52 page PDF, this is basically all you need to be self taught. I think it's a great/excellent resource. I'm sure there are many others too!

CROSS COUNTRY PLANNING & FLYING GUIDE!!
http://www.mountainflying.com/XCGuide/XC%20Guide.pdf



===================================

Hey, the little pocket book that comes with the E6B tells you how to do all the calculations.


As to how to fill out the cross country nav log, it's pretty self explanatory. If you have a book, like a Jepp Book, its all in there.

Should only take a quick sit down with your CFI to learn how to do it if you want to go that route.

Here's an ASF article about how they think a CFI should do it
http://www.aopa.org/asf/publications/inst_reports2.cfm?article=3535

The Navigation Log

Once your student has completed his navigation log, you should review it carefully to catch any gross navigational errors. Along with the usual arithmetic errors, some of the more common errors students make when flight planning include taking reciprocal courses when measuring courses and misreading the mileage scale on the plotter when measuring the mileage between checkpoints. Look for headings that are 180 degrees off and distances that seem too long or too short. Be sure to check the wind correction angles as well. Many students will inadvertently subtract when they should have added, and vice versa. Finally, you should check the entire plan for reasonableness. For example, check the total mileage for the flight and compare it to the estimated time en route and fuel required. All three estimates should agree and make sense.

http://www.mountainflying.com/XCGuide/XC%20Guide.pdf
 

User546

The Ultimate Show Stopper
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Electronic E6B:
http://www.csgnetwork.com/e6bcalc.html

Standard CFI Disclaimer:
Do NOT use this site as a crutch! Know your handheld E6B forwards and backwards, and be very comfortable with all components and calculations of it! Remember, you won't have an internet connection in your Cessna one day when you need to make some quick calculations for a diversion or re-route.
 
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Advantage of a metal E6B versus a cardboard/plastic, or electronic one:

#1 - It can be used to slice cheese, lunch meat, apples, and bad guys.

#2 - You can fry an egg on it.

#3 - Old pilots won't think you are the punk kid they thought you were.

#4 - It can be used to signal for help by reflecting light off it's pretty shiney finish

#5 - It has a better resale value than a plastic or electronic E6B.

#6 - You can find it on a dark cold night in the cockpit easier than a paper or plastic one because it will feel like cold metal!
 

troy

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BRIGADEAVIATOR

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i'm gonna say go for the aopa flight planner program. Last time i used it it filled in everything on a nav log for current wx conditions. You have to be a member though.
 

aeronautic1

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Dude

www.fltplan.com Enter your aircracft performance numbers and voila!!

www.DUAT.com is another great website for weather prognostication and flight planning.

Or, you can do what alot of us do. Call Universal and let them do it.
 
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