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Get a load of this guy...

Mamma

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You would at first write this guy off as some kook, but he is the executive vice president at republic Financial Corp. Just goes to show what those who sit in the ivory towers with golden parachutes think of our profession. He obivously has no idea how much money, time and effort it takes to become one of these extremely overpaid folks. Also, the responsibility, time away from the family...blah blah blah.


Ask any airline executive about pilots and you will get the same response – that they are extremely overpaid. That seems a little harsh, especially as US pilots are taking considerable pay cuts to enable their employers to continue flying. But the Asiana pilots are doing little to dispel this stereotypical view and government intervention now seems inevitable. What are your views on pilots (or airline executives)?

From: Ian Massey, Republic Financial Corporation
Subject: Pilots

Commercial airline pilots get a bad reputation because they are paid a lot of money and many of them have contracts that require them to fly less hours in a month than many people work in a week. When frequent flyers then see pilots dead-heading in first-class seats as is often the case (United being the poster-child for this) it adds to the view that they are overpaid, over-privileged and under-worked.
I prefer to think of it this way. When is someone going to explain to these pilots that we have the technology to replace them altogether and, but for the trepidation of passengers who still believe that it is good to have a real voice in the cockpit, it is possible to fly without pilots. At the very least, with all of the systems at their disposal, it is difficult to conclude that a driver of a school bus has more responsibility than a commercial airline pilot. So pay them accordingly and let them sit at the back of the aircraft when they are not flying leaving the seats at the front for customers.
Is it too much to expect that airlines should serve their customers before their employees? We pay all of their salaries.


About Republic Financial Corporation
Republic Financial Corporation, located in Aurora, Colorado, is a privately held investment company with ownership interests in portfolio companies in commercial roofing, promotional products, corporate staffing, as well as the Internet and data services sector. The company also invests in distressed commercial debt, aviation, equipment lease portfolios, private equity and structured finance transactions and has invested in assets worth $1 billion. Republic was founded in 1971 and has achieved commercial success by structuring creative financial solutions and employing intensive due diligence and asset management to generate significant results. www.republic-financial.com
 

enigma

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He's got to be a cheapskate who books coach and then upgrades to first. Not that there's anything wrong with that......

He's obviously pissed about seeing pilots in First Class, an clear impediment to his cheap entre into said seat.

The funny thing is, he's probably seeing a deadheading FlexJet pilot in FC.

enigma
 

say again

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Mamma said:
Is it too much to expect that airlines should serve their customers before their employees? We pay all of their salaries.
Is it to much for the flying public to quit bitching everytime a fare gets raised:p ?????!!!!! Maybe then pilots won't have their salaries slashed and slashed, repeatedly!!!!! First class is all we have, and there is no way we're giving it up:uzi: !!!!
 

Bob Loblaw

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"Ian Massey graduated from Loughborough University in England with a degree in Aeronautical Engineering in 1973.

"Mr. Massey began his career in the automotive industry with Ford Motor Company and moved on to Massey Ferguson, during which time he became qualified as an accountant.

"In 1980, finance and aerospace came together when he joined British Aerospace, initially in operational audit. He progressed within BAe through a number of financial positions within the headquarters and as finance director of the Hatfield site. In 1989 he became divisional finance director for the Regional Aircraft business of British Aerospace.

"In 1991, Mr. Massey moved to Toulouse, France to join Airbus Industrie as the chief financial officer. In this position, he reported to the supervisory board of Airbus and was a member of the executive board. From 1994, this role was expanded to include the customer finance activities of Airbus. Mr. Massey has also been a member of the Vought Aircraft Industries, Inc. board of directors since April 2001.

"Mr. Massey’s key personal objective during his time at Airbus was to see the consortium re-structured into a "normal" company. With the achievement of this step in 2001, it was his wish to take on a new challenge.

"Mr. Massey joined Republic in September 2001 and has executive responsibility for the Structured Finance, Private Equity and Aviation & Portfolio Groups as well as Corporate Marketing & Communications and myVine, an operating company owned and managed by Republic.
 

Bob Loblaw

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Ian Massey said:
...it is difficult to conclude that a driver of a school bus has more responsibility than a commercial airline pilot.
At least he got this part right, though I don't think it came out the way he meant.
 

Mamma

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Found it in AirFinanceJournal.com. The post that described Ian's background is appalling. He spent his career in the aviation industry and can still say something like this. It has to be the most ignorant statement I have heard in awhile.
 

Mesabi Miner

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Well then...

We can be replaced by automation, huh? O.K., buddy. Let's see how you like it when you check one of your family members in at the counter. Or, perhaps check them into a doctor-less hospital?

What an idiot.

MM
 

FR8mastr

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His working for Airbus certainly explains his views of pilots, he must have fit right in.
 

§kyye Candy

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Wonder what this guy's bonus and pension plan looks like? Wonder if most of us would consider HIM "overpaid" (like most of the cut-and-run execs in airline mgt. today) ??? Maybe the corporate world and so-called "free market economy" (what a joke anymore) is what should be restructured instead.
 

BeCareful!

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FR8mastr said:
His working for Airbus certainly explains his views of pilots, he must have fit right in.

Seeing how shaken some of those JetBlue passengers were as they deplaned in LAX the other day makes me wonder: How scared would they have been if there hadn't been any pilots flying that thing!?!?!
 

capt. megadeth

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I swear if I ever run into one of these tools in a dark alley, they will have black and blue balls.
 

starchkr

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Well He!!, he runs a company based in Da' Hood...what do you expect?! I am sure the Frenchies got ahold of him and turned him anti-american as well.
 

Fridge

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Sounds like he is making the case for management so he can sell more Airbus jets with pilot salaries. What an a-hole.
 

Bob Loblaw

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Ian Massey
Republic Financial Corporation
3300 S. Parker Rd., Suite 500
Aurora, CO 80014
Phone 303.751.3501
Fax 303.751.4777
E-mail Republic
For media inquiries or to request a press kit, contact:
Phone 303.923.2516
email communications@republic-financial.com

DRIVING DIRECTIONS:
Denver International Airport to I-70
1. Go North on PENA BLVD toward TERMINAL W.
2. Stay straight to go onto TERMINAL E.
3. TERMINAL E becomes TERMINAL EAST DEPARTURES.
4. Turn SLIGHT RIGHT onto AIRPORT EXIT.
5. Take PENA BLVD.
6. PENA BLVD becomes I-70 West.
I-70 to Republic
7. From I-70, exit to I-225 S (exit 282) toward COLO SPGS.
8. Merge onto CO-83 S/S PARKER RD (exit 4).
9. Take the VAUGHN WAY/DAM ROAD ramp.
10. Turn RIGHT onto S VAUGHN WAY.
11. Continue straight underneath Parker Road overpass and through stoplight.
12. Follow around to stop sign, turn RIGHT onto HEATHER GARDENS WAY.
13. Continue to first RIGHT, WHEELING ROAD. Enter parking lot for Cherry Creek Place IV.
 

Mamma

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I find it incredilous that a corporate executive from the airline business can call any profession overpayed. Ian needs to take a long look in the mirror and around his peers before he says we have a bad reputation. I figure after the JetBlue incident at LAX, airline pilots are held in high esteem. Didn't Kaslowski from Tyco just go to jail?
 

BLing

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Mamma said:
When is someone going to explain to these pilots that we have the technology to replace them altogether and, but for the trepidation of passengers who still believe that it is good to have a real voice in the cockpit, it is possible to fly without pilots.
Please explain Mr. Massey!
 

TheDonger

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Letters
Our daily newsletter AirFive has provoked many of our readers to respond with their opinions about the events of the past month

AirFive Editorial – Asiana pilots' strike (August 4)
Ask any airline executive about pilots and you will get the same response – that they are extremely overpaid. That seems a little harsh, especially as US pilots are taking considerable pay cuts to enable their employers to continue flying. But the Asiana pilots are doing little to dispel this stereotypical view and government intervention now seems inevitable. What are your views on pilots (or airline executives)?

From: Ian Massey, Republic Financial Corporation
Subject: Pilots
Commercial airline pilots get a bad reputation because they are paid a lot of money and many of them have contracts that require them to fly less hours in a month than many people work in a week. When frequent flyers then see pilots dead-heading in first-class seats as is often the case (United being the poster-child for this) it adds to the view that they are overpaid, over-privileged and under-worked.
I prefer to think of it this way. When is someone going to explain to these pilots that we have the technology to replace them altogether and, but for the trepidation of passengers who still believe that it is good to have a real voice in the cockpit, it is possible to fly without pilots. At the very least, with all of the systems at their disposal, it is difficult to conclude that a driver of a school bus has more responsibility than a commercial airline pilot. So pay them accordingly and let them sit at the back of the aircraft when they are not flying leaving the seats at the front for customers.
Is it too much to expect that airlines should serve their customers before their employees? We pay all of their salaries.

From: Tony Taylor, ECGD
Subject: Pilots verses airline executives
These are my personal views and not those of the ECGD.
The big difference is that pilots have to negotiate for their pay – the executives just award themselves whatever they like, regardless of how well they perform. In the case of Asiana it would be interesting to know the level of pay increases the top executives have given themselves over the past three years compared with the pilots' settlements.

From: Evan Jones, Avbank
Subject: Are pilots overpaid?
Currently there is a shortage of qualified airline pilots. When you consider the time and money for a person to reach airline standards you will understand why so few students are entering the system. The last time we visited this subject the time and expense to become a doctor was less than that of obtaining an airline transport license. Enough said.

AirFive Editorial – Gate Gourmet (August 24) The Gate Gourmet saga is set to drag on even further now chairman David Siegel has left the country for a few days, as even though talks with the union have resumed, a decision is unlikely to be reached without him.
From: Tony Taylor
Subject: Gate Gourmet
Amazing how many employees suddenly become branded as troublemakers when there is a chance of replacing them with even cheaper labour!
I wonder how the pay rates now on offer to the replacements compare in real terms with what BA paid when the catering was inhouse. Perhaps the benefits of outsourcing are not quite as great as the BA management hoped now that they have been dragged into a dispute that is not of their making.
From: Tony Whitty, Cabot Aviation
Subject: Gate Gourmet
I am not a specialist in the catering business but it seems a strange decision for BA to give its catering contract to a company whose whole future depends on it. If for some reason BA wants to stay with Gate Gourmet, then it looks like their cost-cutting plans will need to be put on hold for this particular matter and they will actually have to increase their costs.
From: Hans Joerg Hunziker, Hunziker Lease & Finance
Subject: Gate Gourmet
I have known Gate Gourmet for years as a great company and a true leader in airline catering. What is going on since it has been taken over by Texas Pacific Group is shocking and makes me feel really sad. It seems that a great success story comes to an unhappy end due to a narrowed focus on financials and leverage. The culture and the value of the company are being destroyed day-by-day by means of its top management and owners. I am a finance guy too, but I know that any financial targets are absolutely useless if they are not based on a trustworthy management style and corporate governance. Airlines will think twice before they sign the next contract (or extension) with Gate Gourmet.
From: Terry Spruce
Subject: Gate Gourmet
Clearly this was a problem that was bound to happen sometime. Any airline-related company that needs to cut costs to maintain and compete for business would have to reduce its staff costs somehow, almost as a last resort.
Gate Gourmet appears to have been looking at doing this for over a year now and, in the process, managed to get a little more money from British Airways for its new renewed contract, albeit with a condition that all the sacked workers are taken back. Clearly Gate Gourmet do not want to do this as they see some as troublemakers.
BA are caught up in the dispute simply because Gate Gourmet are their only caterer and BA do not appear to have great relations with their T&GW union members. That is why the BA T&GW members downed tools in support of their Gate Gourmet colleagues.
If this dispute drags on then all the T&GW union members could be balloted and strike action could occur in October, if the dispute is not resolved. The operations at the whole airport then would be affected; it could well bring the airport to a complete stop.
Gate Gourmet even now may not see the solution as one that they could live with and go into administration, even with the new BA deal. In the worst-case scenario, Gate Gourmet would cease trading in the UK and put many more workers on the dole, not only at Heathrow. BA would have no caterer and have no one capable of replacing Gate Gourmet and the airline would still have pretty bad relations with its own T&GW union members. Again, if Gate Gourmet cease trading, then it is not only BA that would suffer; they have other contracts here in the UK, all those airlines would have to find alternative caterers, too.
The solution. The easiest is to reinstate all the workers but what would industrial relations be like at Gate Gourmet, at best not that good and this problem could well come again. Taking some of the workers back may help but again relations won't be that good. If Gate Gourmet cease, all we get are over 1,000 workers made redundant at Heathrow and others around the country, too. Worst still, BA flights are cancelled again and no catering on BA flights in the short term and in the longer term, BA has the problem of trying to sign new catering contracts with someone else quickly and BA may well have to pay over the odds to get the catering it needs. BA is hit twice for a problem which is not of their own making.
Maybe what should happen here is that BA contracts two catering companies in the future so that this problem may not occur again.
From: Evan Jones, AvBank
Subject: BA strike
Outsourcing, or lateral integration as we call it, has its problems unless there are built-in safeguards. Splitting the contract is one and liability insurance for non-compliance by the supplier is another. Whatever the case, lateral integration is the only solution if you go with a reliable source, even if it is not the lowest bidder.
 

Ty Webb

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Sent via e-mail:



I was amazed to read the demented ramblings of Ian Massey, who apparently believes that airline pilots have less of a responsibility than bus drivers and are overpaid, lazy, and shouldn't be sitting in First Class while deadheading.


I am sure his former employers at Airbus were happy to read how one of their former top executives viewed the very people who operate their equipment and participate in the buying decision.

Apparently, he has no idea what our jobs entail. I invite him to introduce himself to the crew the next time he boards an aircraft, and express his views to them in person.

I hope your company does the right thing and sends this moron packing . . . . . I know I would.

TW

 

rice

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Couldn't resist send him an email

WRT Mr. Massey's email.
I suggest Mr. Massey volunteer to be a passenger on the first Pilotless aircraft to have a nose gear malfunction such as Jetblue 292 recently experienced. I'm quite certain that the results of such an occurrence would rectify both his problems with professional pilots and our problems with him.
 
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