Garmin equipped GA aircraft

polysciguy9

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 10, 2005
Posts
96
Total Time
<40hrs
I'm wondering what people think of the new line of glass cockpit GA planes. I've had a chance to see one of the new 182s, and got to play around with the computers on a training display at my FBO. It seems to me that some of the engine read-outs are a bit small, such as the tachometer. Plus I would think it might be difficult to get accustomed to the airspeed tape which doesn't stand out like the needle on a typical gauge. Might make it difficult to capture airspeed trends, ya know? I know the guys who fly jets have no problem with it, but it just seems overly advanced for my tastes.

What do you guys who fly these aircraft think? I'm probably the only person who isn't a fan of the glass cockpit for GA aircraft, but I was just curious. The GPS display is nice, though.
 

Lead Sled

Sitt'n on the throne...
Joined
Apr 1, 2004
Posts
2,066
Total Time
> enuf
polysciguy9 said:
I'm probably the only person who isn't a fan of the glass cockpit for GA aircraft...
I understand where you're coming from. I wasn't a big fan of glass cockpits at first (I'm a very traditional kind of guy), but that changed about 10 minutes into my first flight. That was over 15 years ago and now I would hate to have to go back. It's all about situational awareness - having all of the data given you in a usable, meaningful, easy to understand and manage way. Granted there are some pitfalls - until you get a handle on how to use the equipment there can be a very real danger of information overload. Also, for many pilots there is a real tendency to spend too much "heads down" time. Getting used to the tape displays only takes a few hours so it's basically a non-issue.

'Sled
 

Jafar

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2002
Posts
332
Total Time
~1000
I'm doing my instrument training in a DA-40 with the 1000. It doesn't take much to learn, few hours of ground. For a low time guy like me it's ideal because I haven't gotten accustomed to conventional instruments for thousands of hours. I like it. Makes you feel like you're flying some high tech piece of hardware.;)
 

NW_Pilot

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 13, 2005
Posts
1,088
Total Time
2500+
Jafar said:
I'm doing my instrument training in a DA-40 with the 1000. It doesn't take much to learn, few hours of ground. For a low time guy like me it's ideal because I haven't gotten accustomed to conventional instruments for thousands of hours. I like it. Makes you feel like you're flying some high tech piece of hardware.;)
I would say that you should also learn how to use the analog instruments! Computers fail! GPS system can be shut down! Hope microsoft don't start writing the OS for these systems. I could see the blue screen now!
 

DGdaPilot

Parrot Head Pilot
Joined
Feb 11, 2003
Posts
672
Total Time
5:00
If you can play an Atari game, you can fly glass. Sure the trend indications are different, but that's to be expected from something different like this. Trust me, you'll get used to it. Wanna know what aircraft (actually simulator) introduced me to the wonderful world of glass? The CRJ-700. I thought it would be tough, but it was actually quite easy. Now I love flying around our glass C-182.

The only issue I see in the future is students transitioning from glass to steam gauges (and having no prior experience with traditional gauges). That may be tough for some people, but I guess time will tell. Welcome to the 21st century. Enjoy it.
 

DGdaPilot

Parrot Head Pilot
Joined
Feb 11, 2003
Posts
672
Total Time
5:00
NW_Pilot said:
I would say that you should also learn how to use the analog instruments! Computers fail! GPS system can be shut down! Hope microsoft don't start writing the OS for these systems. I could see the blue screen now!
You forget that glass cockpit aircraft have traditional gauges and must be flown on them when an electrical hiccup happens.
 

molson247

Gettin' my drink on
Joined
Nov 7, 2005
Posts
80
Total Time
1500
The Garmin G1000 is well thought out and pretty user freindly once you are accustomed to it. I thought the same thing at first about the tach and manifold pressure reading size, but I have not had a problem. I will say that the Primary Flight Display's (PFD) attitude indicator is great for IFR ops and you will realize how small the old steam gauge attitude indicators are!!!
 

mtrv

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 14, 2004
Posts
156
Total Time
500-
NW_Pilot said:
I would say that you should also learn how to use the analog instruments! Computers fail! GPS system can be shut down! Hope microsoft don't start writing the OS for these systems. I could see the blue screen now!
Glass is the future. I've even heard that all new Cessna 172/182's will be glass. As to computers failing, there are backup instruments to the glass. Ask anyone flying GPS for the last 15 years or so, how often the GPS system has been shut down, in comparison to out of service VOR's and NDB's. I'll take the GPS reliability.

Glass greatly enhances situational awareness, which is quite an improvement over all the steam gauge pilots who still fly into rising terrain, during lost moments of situational awareness. GA, military, and commercial are all included.

New students starting with the private instruction, then on through instrument, have shaved an average of 45 hours off getting their ratings, when compared in a test with students using the basic gauge setup. The glass panel students began with instrument flight in the initial instruction.

The new glass panels offered by Garmin and Avidyne, complete with terrain, terrain warning, XM Satellite weather, Jeppeson airport/taxiway diagrams, traffic avoidance; are much better than what some military and commercial pilots get! :)
 

Pugh

Droopy Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Posts
192
Total Time
5
Glass is definately a good thing. While some may not like it, it's the wave of the future. Situational awareness is a phrase thrown around quite a bit but this really is a leap forward in S.A. It's here to stay whether some folks like it or not. The FAA is going to have to do something instrument training though...I'd be worried about somone jumping from a G1000 into regular ol' steam gauges with little to no experience in them.

Though I do agree, I think G1000s in 172s might be overkill in an environment besides training.
 

mtrv

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 14, 2004
Posts
156
Total Time
500-
Pugh said:
The FAA is going to have to do something instrument training though...I'd be worried about somone jumping from a G1000 into regular ol' steam gauges with little to no experience in them.

Though I do agree, I think G1000s in 172s might be overkill in an environment besides training.
Alan Klapmeier of Cirrus, brought up this subject in the latest edition of AOPA Pilot. In his view, it's easy to upgrade from steam gauges to the glass panels, but un-safe to fly steam gauges, if the instrument instruction program was using glass.

As to 172's, glass cockpits , and training; that's the whole idea.
 
Top