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G. Tilton leads JetBlue Airways as ATA Chairman

Rez O. Lewshun

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Got JPBA?


As a member of a the airline "lobby group" Glenn Tilton will be helping JB management...




On Thursday in Washington , D.C. , the board of directors of the Air Transport Association of America (ATA), the industry trade organization that represents the leading U.S. airlines, unanimously elected Glenn Tilton as chairman of the ATA Board of Directors. He will serve a two-year term.

"Glenn has proven time and again his strong leadership ability during the most tumultuous of times," said ATA President and CEO James C. May. "Under Glenn’s chairmanship, ATA will work vigorously with the new administration and Congress on a number of aviation priorities, including air traffic modernization, energy policy and the implementation of fair and practical environmental protection measures."


The ATA is widely recognized by Congress, the Department of Transportation, the Federal Aviation Administration, the Department of Homeland Security and other governmental and regulatory agencies as representing the collective interests of the industry. ATA works to foster a business and economic environment that promotes safe and efficient air transportation. The ATA has taken the lead on key issues facing our industry, including a campaign launched earlier this year to stop excessive oil speculation that was primarily responsible for driving up fuel prices, and efforts to modernize our air traffic control system and fairly fund our next generation ATC system.

"I am pleased to serve as chairman of the ATA, and along with my fellow directors look forward to partnering with the new administration and the Congress on initiatives that will further both the performance of the industry and the economic contribution to the U.S. economy," Tilton said. "Airlines are a driver of economic growth, contributing more than $1.1 trillion in value to the economy and creating more than 10 million jobs. With a modernized air traffic control system, we can deliver better financial, operational and environmental results to the benefit of our customers, our employees, our stakeholders and the communities we serve."

ATA members comprise the largest passenger and cargo carriers in the U.S. , including American Airlines, Continental Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Federal Express, Southwest Airlines, United Airlines, UPS Airlines and US Airways.
 

Cheeta

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Got JPBA?


As a member of a the airline "lobby group" Glenn Tilton will be helping JB management...




On Thursday in Washington , D.C. , the board of directors of the Air Transport Association of America (ATA), the industry trade organization that represents the leading U.S. airlines, unanimously elected Glenn Tilton as chairman of the ATA Board of Directors. He will serve a two-year term.

"Glenn has proven time and again his strong leadership ability during the most tumultuous of times," said ATA President and CEO James C. May. "Under Glenn’s chairmanship, ATA will work vigorously with the new administration and Congress on a number of aviation priorities, including air traffic modernization, energy policy and the implementation of fair and practical environmental protection measures."

The ATA is widely recognized by Congress, the Department of Transportation, the Federal Aviation Administration, the Department of Homeland Security and other governmental and regulatory agencies as representing the collective interests of the industry. ATA works to foster a business and economic environment that promotes safe and efficient air transportation. The ATA has taken the lead on key issues facing our industry, including a campaign launched earlier this year to stop excessive oil speculation that was primarily responsible for driving up fuel prices, and efforts to modernize our air traffic control system and fairly fund our next generation ATC system.

"I am pleased to serve as chairman of the ATA, and along with my fellow directors look forward to partnering with the new administration and the Congress on initiatives that will further both the performance of the industry and the economic contribution to the U.S. economy," Tilton said. "Airlines are a driver of economic growth, contributing more than $1.1 trillion in value to the economy and creating more than 10 million jobs. With a modernized air traffic control system, we can deliver better financial, operational and environmental results to the benefit of our customers, our employees, our stakeholders and the communities we serve."

ATA members comprise the largest passenger and cargo carriers in the U.S. , including American Airlines, Continental Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Federal Express, Southwest Airlines, United Airlines, UPS Airlines and US Airways.

First it's JBPA and second glenn tilton has been on this board for years.........MSU.....Makin Sh#t up!

Toolbox alert!
 

FlyAuburn

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So how is this going to affect my QOL? And if so, what about the other airlines? Looks to me like you have some kind of beef with JB, which is fine, but you're the one that's losing credibility with the nonsense post. But, feel free to educate me.
 

Rez O. Lewshun

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feel free to educate me.

The ATA is the lobby group for the airlines. The airlines use the ATA to influence Congress to change laws that favor airline companies.

Laws that favor airlines don't necessarily favor pilots. At times they do, often they do not.

Glenn Tilton is such a great CEO and accepted by the UAL pilots that they have created a lovely website

www.glenntilton.com

Check it out...



Anyway, So now Glenn is Chairman of the BOD for the ATA, of which JB, the airline, is a member.

So when Glenn Tilton provides direction to JB management at the ATA BOD meeting do you think he is considering JB pilots?

At least the UAL pilots can counter the ATA influence on CapHill with their own association. The JB pilots are voiceless.


Why is it JB management an Association member but the JB pilots are not?


It just confirms that my and other non JB pilots', contribution to the JBPA was correct.


Thoughts?
 

FlyAuburn

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The ATA is the lobby group for the airlines. The airlines use the ATA to influence Congress to change laws that favor airline companies.

Laws that favor airlines don't necessarily favor pilots. At times they do, often they do not.

Glenn Tilton is such a great CEO and accepted by the UAL pilots that they have created a lovely website

www.glenntilton.com

Check it out...



Anyway, So now Glenn is Chairman of the BOD for the ATA, of which JB, the airline, is a member.

So when Glenn Tilton provides direction to JB management at the ATA BOD meeting do you think he is considering JB pilots?

At least the UAL pilots can counter the ATA influence on CapHill with their own association. The JB pilots are voiceless.


Why is it JB management an Association member but the JB pilots are not?


It just confirms that my and other non JB pilots', contribution to the JBPA was correct.


Thoughts?

Thanks for the donation, seriously. I agree that any association with that P.O.S. is not good. I briefly read through that article and all it mentioned was ATC, environmental stuff, etc. How in the world will Tilton influence Dave B. on pay, rigs, insurance, etc.?
At this point Tilton is useless against the JBPA campaign - that's what F&H is for.

So I'm trying to see the direct connection that you see. :confused: You donated to JBPA, I guess I was wrong about any ill will towards us. My bad.
 

Rez O. Lewshun

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Thanks for the donation, seriously. I agree that any association with that P.O.S. is not good. I briefly read through that article and all it mentioned was ATC, environmental stuff, etc. How in the world will Tilton influence Dave B. on pay, rigs, insurance, etc.?
At this point Tilton is useless against the JBPA campaign - that's what F&H is for.

So I'm trying to see the direct connection that you see. :confused: You donated to JBPA, I guess I was wrong about any ill will towards us. My bad.


Jetblue is a member of the ATA a lobby group that influences Congress on keeping or changing federal law to airlines' advantage. Such as flight time duty time, foreign ownership (Tilton wants it) and control. I believe it would not be in JB pilots' interest if JB could be foreigned owned. With no binding contract or CBA, foreign labor can easily take JB pilot jobs.

JB takes money, that its pilots hep generate, and pays membership dues/fees to belong to the ATA.

The ATA is run on a daily basis by James May, but direction is provided by the BOD of which now Tilton leads.

Tilton is not an airline man. He is a corporati. He cares about money. He will, as he has, screw pilots and employees to get more.

Now he leads JB when they discuss how they will lobby Congress. In a sense, JB pilots are funding their own "enemy", as we all are, but many pilot groups have a voice to counter their managements. JB pilots do not.

However, if you notice the JBPA has joined up with CAPA. CAPA is a conglomerate of non-ALPA pilot unions that lobby congress.

ALPA for years and before CAPA, has been the [effective] pilot lobby group...for all pilot groups, whether they've been ALPA pilots or not! In fact the ATA was formed in 1936, 5 years after ALPA was formed, in part to counter ALPA's effectiveness on CapHill.

Pilot groups like the APA, NPA, IPA, SWAPA and IBT realized that they needed a voice on CapHill too, so they formed CAPA. If your group has no voice on CapHill it is like being a citizen without rights. A dramatic example is a Muslim woman with a burka. No identity, no face, no voice, no rights.


In house unions are attractive because its easier to manage one pilot group at one company than multiple pilot groups at different brands. This is one reason ALPA gets a bad rap.

However, the downside to being in house (Frontier pilots, a non CAPA member, for example) is no voice on CapHill. Without representation on CapHill then an in house is really just spinning its wheels.



The new realm is global.

There will be so many issues that will effect every airline pilot on a global scale that pilots must have a voice, just like we need one nationally.

And yes, JetBlue management via the ATA is represented internationally, at ICAO for Int'l issues.

Just as CAPA is getting effective on CapHill, they are already falling behind because the 21st Century is all about globalization and CAPA has no voice at IACO.

So, its good that the JB pilots are looking to be heard on the national level, but as soon as they get connected they will have to figure out how to get connected internationally.

One might say "Why should JB pilots care about international or globalization?" With LH getting involved in JB's business plan it is kind of obvious. In addition, ICAO can be influenced to change international policy that could effect national regulatory agencies such as the FAA, which will effect JB pilots.


All politics is local.....
 
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kommutrdog

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JBPA is a cancer.

Here is a little snippet:

At Orlando International Airport, we are the only U.S. airline to be experiencing growth. Our seats are up 11% year-over-year while seat capacity for the airport overall is down nearly 10%. Thank you for all you do to make this impressive record possible!

What is the difference that makes the difference?

Maybe we should get a union. After all, look at the tremendous help they have been to TWA, US Airways, TransStates with GoJet.

Perhaps we should compare JB 4 year FO pay with a 4 year America West FO...oh wait, you can't.

He's furloughed.

I'm not a management shill. I just see things the way they are.

I find it amusing how born-and-bred American dopes think they can get something for nothing.

Everyone joined JB knowing gawd-damned well it was a non-union shop, and now you have cancer-promotors crying "I, I, I. Me. Me. Me."

Give me a break.

Last month alone, 534,000 Americans lost their jobs and people want to form a union? This is a joke, right?
 

CaptainSpaz

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kommutrdog,

So you decided to step off of your right wing soap box for a minute to come over here and set all the poor misguided JBPA supporters straight? They really are just representative of everything that is wrong with this country, right? I mean, Americans are just so stupid it makes you want to spit, right?

Spaz
 

kommutrdog

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I think the intentions of most of the JBPA supporters are genuine. To improve the quality of life/pay/benefits of the pilots at Jetblue. I can respect that.

What I don't get at all, is how in the world people think that forming a union will improve anything?

Did ALPO help TransStates pilots keep GoJets from flying 70 seaters?

Was ALPO able to "protect" the pensions of United, US Air or Delta pilots?

How did unionism work out of the USAir pilots when Cactus bought them?

Right now there is a 4 year FO from America West on the street without a paycheck. He belongs to a union.

Right now there is a 4 year FO at Jetblue reading an email about how we are expanding our route structure. He still has a paycheck. It's not big enough, I'll grant you that, but he is still here.

Jetblue, with all its faults is the best run airline in the country.

We only lost $11 million in Q3. Delta is burning through a billion A QUARTER.

Look down the road a few years. There is a reason Lufthansa has 2 execs on our B.O.D. You think that David Neeleman's outfit (AZUL) in Brazil & the boys from Lufthansa aren't gonna talk turkey in a few years?

JB, with the business partnerships that are being put into place has the potential to be part of something dominant.

JBPA has the opportunity to screw all that up.

If the junior FOs at JB, of which I am one, think that forming a collective bargaining agent will help our quality-of-life and/or job security, they are very much mistaken.

The history of unions has shown time and time and time again that THE FIRST people that get sold down the river are the junior ones.

Direct quote from one of our Airbus captains, undoubtedly in the extreme minority:

"If we had a union, I wouldn't have had my monthly flying our reduced because we could have just furloughed the bottom 10%".

In other words: "F-you. I got mine, you get yours"

I'll hitch my wagon to Dave Barger & the boyz from Lufthansa, and not the JBPA.
 

Rez O. Lewshun

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I think the intentions of most of the JBPA supporters are genuine. To improve the quality of life/pay/benefits of the pilots at Jetblue. I can respect that.

What I don't get at all, is how in the world people think that forming a union will improve anything?

It is more than just pay and bennies at the local level....



Look down the road a few years. There is a reason Lufthansa has 2 execs on our B.O.D. You think that David Neeleman's outfit (AZUL) in Brazil & the boys from Lufthansa aren't gonna talk turkey in a few years?

This is exactly the reason to form a union. LH and Neeleman are going to talk turkey... the question is... are they going to consider the JB pilots? Even if they do, will they represent the JB pilots as the JB pilots want?

Right now, HOW do the JB pilots talk to Congress if JB was getting sold or merged and the JB pilots were getting a raw deal?

JB pilots need effective representation NOW, so when Execs start talking turkey they can address the issues.

JB, with the business partnerships that are being put into place has the potential to be part of something dominant.

JBPA has the opportunity to screw all that up.

I have faith in the JB pilots to represent themselves. They are smart pilots. If they can fly jets then they can also govern themselves.

It seems other groups in this country can organize committees, groups and associations... why not JB pilots?


If the junior FOs at JB, of which I am one, think that forming a collective bargaining agent will help our quality-of-life and/or job security, they are very much mistaken.

The history of unions has shown time and time and time again that THE FIRST people that get sold down the river are the junior ones.

Direct quote from one of our Airbus captains, undoubtedly in the extreme minority:


In other words: "F-you. I got mine, you get yours"

I hear the same thing at my airline... and we have ALPA. The difference is, I can effectively organize the junior pilots at my pilot group to counter the Old man geezer syndrome.

You can too... however, without scheduled meetings, etc... IOW an organization, it is much much harder...


I'll hitch my wagon to Dave Barger & the boyz from Lufthansa, and not the JBPA.

Let us know if they provide you a campsite for your wagon, with water and power hookups at their campground.....

I am guessing they will not....
 

bluesideup340

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The 7 Myth on Foreign ownership

Myth 1 : We Need US Carriers for National Security
On 3 April 2003, Speaker Dennis Hastert used this argument to defend Congress' $3.2 billion airline aid plan. He said '[it is necessary that] we don't have a whole industry collapse at a time when maybe we need it most' (referring, presumably, to the Iraqi conflict).
It is true that there is a program (the CRAF - Civil Reserve Air Fleet) whereby US airlines hire planes to the military when needed, giving the military additional airlift capacity. But this program would apply equally to any US based, US incorporated airline, no matter where the shareholders were based.
A US corporation is bound by US laws, no matter who or where its shareholders are based.
Furthermore, the US airlines are generously remunerated in return for their military charters, indeed some experts suggest it would be cheaper and better if the US government and Tax payer to simply tendered for charters on the open market!

Myth 2 : Foreign Airlines Don't Have the Same Security Standards
Maybe foreign airlines do, maybe they don't have the same security standards as US airlines. But, who cares? This is a red herring argument, because we're not talking about foreign airlines. We're talking about a US airline, subject to all US regulations and controls.
Sure, the airline may be owned in part or by whole by off-shore investors, but it is a US airline, operated by US permanent residents and citizens, and following all US standards and procedures.

Myth 3 : Foreign Airlines Don't Have the Same Safety Standards
The answer to this myth is exactly the same as the answer to myth #2.

Myth 4 : Foreign Airlines Would Take Away Jobs from Americans
A US based carrier is subject to the same laws for who it can employ, no matter who its owners might be. All US carriers have to employ either lawfully admitted foreign nationals on special work visas, or US permanent residents, and indeed, for some jobs, they can only employ full US citizens.
There is no difference in these laws if the airline is owned by people in London or Little Rock.

Myth 5 : A Foreign Airline would replace High Paying Jobs with Low Paying Jobs
Any company is free to set whatever terms of employment it can agree upon with its workers (and possibly the unions that represent them).
And, in case anyone hasn't noticed, all those 'high paying' airline jobs are under massive threat at present as the traditional carriers lay off staff and reduce the wages (and pension plans!) of those that remain.
All new startup airlines are building their operations on lower employee costs than the traditional carriers. And their staff seem to be delighted to accept the opportunity to work with them, too. They're surely not complaining, so why should we!

Myth 6 : A Foreign Airline would 'cherry pick' only the Profitable Routes
This myth suggests that the foreign (owned) airline would only fly on the 'easy major routes that any airline can make a profit on'. By reducing the ability of the existing airlines to make profits on the major routes, the existing airlines would no longer be able to subsidize the other loss-making routes that they currently operate as a public service.
As recently as this week, a noted travel writer commented 'having a national airline protects the nation's transportation network from being at the mercy of foreign carriers to whom profits are more important than whether the country's capital has daily service from New York, Chicago, Tokyo, or Timbuktu.'
This myth is full of nonsense in several areas. Any start-up airline, no matter who or where their owners are, carefully works out a business plan that has them concentrating on some 'easy' routes that they think they can make a profit on. As the new airline grows, they build out from their core routes so as to grow their total network in an organic manner.
The second piece of nonsense is there is no such thing as an 'easy' major route that any airline can make a profit on! If there was, then all airlines would be on that route already, and more, totally US owned, airlines would be starting up to add more services to that route.
The third piece of nonsense is that none of the major airlines operate as a social charity. If they can't make money on a route, they will stop flying it. Plain and simple. All 'for profit' airlines work on the same basis, no matter where their shareholders sit.
The ownership of a new startup airline again makes no substantial difference to the external marketplace factors that influence all airlines and their present operations.

Myth 7 - Profits will be Taken Offshore
Some people have made the ridiculous suggestion that allowing foreigners to own US airlines means that they'll take all the profits offshore and somehow harm the US economy in the process.
Look around you. Exactly which US carrier is making so much profit that transferring some share of it offshore would harm the economy!?
Even in a very good year, shareholder dividends rarely exceed a very few percent of total revenue - repatriation of dividends is a negligible matter.
And such concerns haven't prevented foreign ownership of just about every other type of company (with the exception of media outlets and shipping companies). So let's allow foreign ownership of airlines, too.​
 

Smoking Man

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JBPA is a cancer.

Here is a little snippet:



What is the difference that makes the difference?

Maybe we should get a union. After all, look at the tremendous help they have been to TWA, US Airways, TransStates with GoJet.

Perhaps we should compare JB 4 year FO pay with a 4 year America West FO...oh wait, you can't.

He's furloughed.

I'm not a management shill. I just see things the way they are.

I find it amusing how born-and-bred American dopes think they can get something for nothing.

Everyone joined JB knowing gawd-damned well it was a non-union shop, and now you have cancer-promotors crying "I, I, I. Me. Me. Me."

Give me a break.

Last month alone, 534,000 Americans lost their jobs and people want to form a union? This is a joke, right?

If you see things the way they are, how do you see the 423 million dollars of payments to unscheduled debt reduction this year (besides us not getting profit sharing from it)? Personally I see it as smart (early debt reduction), but by not putting it in the bank and showing a profit for the previous three quarters does not equal us loosing money. Actually we are a cash flow positive airline. Also none of the figures include the Ars related $110 million line of credit or a 55 million dollar loan. Third quarter prasm up 16% year over year. An increase of $150 million dollars this year in Ancillary Revenue.

Your vision is short sided at best.

These are not my numbers, it came from the companys presentation at the Credit Suisse Global Airline Conference 12/02/08.

Also having a union the company could not have taken away our pts at premium pay just to make the "raise" cost neutral.

JBPA
 

bluesideup340

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Also having a union the company could not have taken away our pts at premium pay just to make the "raise" cost neutral.

JBPA[/quote]

Quiet a statement. You are assuming the Union negotiators can squeeze every golden egg out of the goose just because it is a Union CBA. In fact cost neutral contracts are not new what is different in the case of JB is the distribution. In our Pilot world of seniority is everything most often pay raises are financed bottom up.
Although, the last contract was not great for all crewmembers neither will or have CBAs ever been fair for all. That being said, the PVC and the company will work on this again in 2009. On the other hand, a CBA last at least 5 to 7 years.
 

Bavarian Chef

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"Quiet" indeed.

That being said, the PVC and the company will work on this again in 2009. On the other hand, a CBA last at least 5 to 7 years.

Huh? Since when did the PVC become a bargaining agent? They have repeatedly told me they are not. Did their status change recently?

Did the pilot group authorize it?
 
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Bavarian Chef

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My favorite kommutrdog quotes:

"I find it amusing how born-and-bred American dopes think they can get something for nothing."

"I think the intentions of most of the JBPA supporters are genuine. To improve the quality of life/pay/benefits of the pilots at Jetblue. I can respect that."
 

Smoking Man

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Also having a union the company could not have taken away our pts at premium pay just to make the "raise" cost neutral.

JBPA

Quiet a statement. You are assuming the Union negotiators can squeeze every golden egg out of the goose just because it is a Union CBA. In fact cost neutral contracts are not new what is different in the case of JB is the distribution. In our Pilot world of seniority is everything most often pay raises are financed bottom up.
Although, the last contract was not great for all crewmembers neither will or have CBAs ever been fair for all. That being said, the PVC and the company will work on this again in 2009. On the other hand, a CBA last at least 5 to 7 years. [/quote]

Ignore all of the other data in my post and pick this?

You are missing the point, PTS was "TAKEN" not negotated away.

The first PCRB, only one person on it did not have a blackberry, so the company presented the data it wanted to. Win Company, loose pilots.

The second PCRB, [(excellent doccument), Direct question did you bother to read it?] the dompany disregards the vast majority of information in it.

Big deal if the company and the PVC have a third one, "do the right thing" is just sicker on the wall in Forrest Hills. News flash two years are gone and the only real changes are on paper (cost neutral) my eyes are wide open, you continue to follow the carrot on the stick.
 

Smoking Man

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Bluesideup340

I guess the stars are directing you not to respond eh?

Also if you do respond answer the question and don't bother with spin. My dad sold used cars for a living, I know BS the moment I see it.

Quite frankly you and the BoB fail at even having an old lady only drove this car on sunday sales pitch.
 

bluesideup340

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Dear Smoking Man,
The constellation of the heavenly bodies have very little to do with my silence.
What could I possible say to the son of used car salesman after such an eloquent and convincing sales pitch?
Of course, a man of your caliber only has to utter the words “This is a good for you” and I am left with no option but believe and trust you. Isn’t that the reason everybody trusts a used car salesman?

Who will you blame after your Union will make concessions during negotiations that do not benefit you?
 

clickclickboom

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Heck we make plenty of concessions without a union so to give your argument some validity lets assume the status quo continues.. Just putting a leash on this pro management based pvc would be an excellent start.
 
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