Welcome to Flightinfo.com

  • Register now and join the discussion
  • Friendliest aviation Ccmmunity on the web
  • Modern site for PC's, Phones, Tablets - no 3rd party apps required
  • Ask questions, help others, promote aviation
  • Share the passion for aviation
  • Invite everyone to Flightinfo.com and let's have fun

Foreign Ownership of a Fractional Company

Welcome to Flightinfo.com

  • Register now and join the discussion
  • Modern secure site, no 3rd party apps required
  • Invite your friends
  • Share the passion of aviation
  • Friendliest aviation community on the web

surveypilot

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 5, 2003
Posts
249
Are there any restriction on foreign ownership of a 91 subpart k company? I know that 49 U.S.C. § 41102 addresses US ownership of air carriers, but I can't find anything that specifically addresses the citizenship requirements of the program manager.

TIA
 
I'm not sure about Part 91K but you can't survive in the fractional industry without a 135 certificate and the ability to fly charter. I KNOW the foreign ownership rules apply to that. Ask anybody that worked for TAG.....
 
No limits on 91k to my knowledge, but a foreign entity may not operate an air carrier here. FlexJet is the perfect example. Owned by Bombardier, but operate on a U.S. 135 certificate for non 91(k) flights, hence the "Solutions" call sign instead of "FlexJet" when flying part 135.

Note: I do not fly for Flex, so if I have over simplified or supplied incorrect information please correct me.
 
It is "own or control" a US air carrier. Who controls "Solutions"? A Canadian company? What's the difference from TAG?
 
It is "own or control" a US air carrier. Who controls "Solutions"? A Canadian company? What's the difference from TAG?

Business Jet Solutions' majority owner is an individual who is a U.S. citizen. Bombardier is a minority owner and does not control the company, but does provide the aircraft through Flexjet.

One curiousity of the arrangement. Part 135 requires the operator to have "exclusive use" of at least one aircraft. Since all of the Lears and Challengers are operated by Flexjet as well, BJS needed an "exclusive" plane. The certificate lists a Cessna 172.

(You can look it up!)
 
"Since all of the Lears and Challengers are operated by Flexjet as well, BJS needed an "exclusive" plane. The certificate lists a Cessna 172."


Freudian slip? Does the certificate have any a/c other than Flexjet's or the 172?
 
"Since all of the Lears and Challengers are operated by Flexjet as well, BJS needed an "exclusive" plane. The certificate lists a Cessna 172."


Freudian slip? Does the certificate have any a/c other than Flexjet's or the 172?

I don't know about now, but 12 years ago, I was flying an airplane that was on the BJS certificate. They had many airplanes around the country that were on their certificate. Since the operational control changes a few years ago, I don't know how many non-Flex airplanes they have on certificate.
 
I don't know about now, but 12 years ago, I was flying an airplane that was on the BJS certificate. They had many airplanes around the country that were on their certificate. Since the operational control changes a few years ago, I don't know how many non-Flex airplanes they have on certificate.

That used to be true, but all those planes were removed from the certificate some years ago.

I heard about the 172 as well. I think it's parked in Addison somewhere.
 
I heard about the 172 as well. I think it's parked in Addison somewhere.

And for an airplane to remain on a certificate, a pilot has to remain current. Do the CP and DO draw straws to see who "gets" to take the check ride with a Fed every year? :laugh:
 

Latest posts

Latest resources

Back
Top