fixed wing to rotor transition

sirius100

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I'm interested in adding rotor craft to my certificate. My company has a few choppers and I have the chance to get some time in them. I was wondering if anyone can recommend some good books on the transition.

Thanks
 

AirCobra

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I recommend the Jeppesen books in their helicopter pilot kit. These books are what most schools use to train with. If you are doing your training in an R-22, Robinson makes a nice flight training guide too, which they will give you for free if you attend their factory training course.

No books specifically address transition from fixed wing to rotor wing. Treat the transition as totally seperate and do will do a lot better. Best analogy I can use is driving a car vs. driving a semi-tractor/trailer. Both use the same rules of the road, both have things like headlights and speedometers, but driving a car and driving a semi are very different.

Two other words of advice, don't call a helicopter a "chopper" and don't ever go to justhelicopters.com
 

AirCobra

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I don't know what happened to JH. It had its moments before but now it seems to have been highjacked by people posting unfunny comments about Silverstate and Robinson helicopters and pictures of silcone stocked bikini models or morbidly obese women. It used to be pretty helpful in learning about a comapny or finding a job but now...yikes!
 

stupidpilot

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I recommend the Jeppesen books in their helicopter pilot kit. These books are what most schools use to train with. If you are doing your training in an R-22, Robinson makes a nice flight training guide too, which they will give you for free if you attend their factory training course.

No books specifically address transition from fixed wing to rotor wing. Treat the transition as totally seperate and do will do a lot better. Best analogy I can use is driving a car vs. driving a semi-tractor/trailer. Both use the same rules of the road, both have things like headlights and speedometers, but driving a car and driving a semi are very different.

Two other words of advice, don't call a helicopter a "chopper" and don't ever go to justhelicopters.com
Nobody but this guy cares if you call em choppers or helicopters or whatever. I found fixed wing and rotor to be almost the same in forward flight, except for using your feet. The big differences are you are always CAT A on approaches and you can always use straight in mins because once you break out all you have to do is turn the nose into the wind to land. Things happen more slowly in helicopters too. So you'll have to adjust your ILS intercept turn, things like that. Its not hard at all. Once you've got hovering down(especially in an R-22) you've got it made.
 

AirCobra

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In 15 years of flying helicopters I have never heard another helicopter pilot call a helicopter a "chopper". The closest any helicopter pilot has come in my experience is with news helicopter call signs like "Chopper Five". I think it may be an archaic term for helicopters no longer used by the people that actually fly them. Sort of like the old days when pilots used to call airplanes "ships". When was the last time anyone asked you what kind of "ship" you fly?

The usual response I have heard from other pilots when someone uses the term "chopper" is; "CHOPPER...isn't that some kind of motorcycle?"
 

Rick1128

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A couple of things you will need to look at are Part 61 and the appropriate PTS guide. For an add-on there are several things that you will not be required to do during the check ride. This will speed it up some.

There are several books that cover helicopter flight. All of them have good information. Most important is the flight instructor. Having gone through the add-on process, it was my experience that having an instructor that was dual rated was beneficial. While many things do translate from FW to RW, many do not. And could cause negative transfer issues.

Be aware, that this transition is not only fun it is also addictive.
 

sirius100

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Thanks for the reading suggestions. Mr. Cobra, ease up their mate, choppers and helis are common terms outside the states. If that's not something your used to and it bothers you so much you keep posting about it, well thats your own personal battle mate.
fly safe
 

avbug

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You might try verticalreference.com, too.

Just helicopters has two forums; one is the older site which isn't very professional, and the other is the "newer" forum which is *supposed* to show a little more decorum.
 
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What are the training & hourly requirements I would have to fulfill if I have a fixed-wing ATP and desire a private/instrument rotorwing certificate?

Thanks

ZP
 

Andy Neill

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Z Pilot,
Here is the way I read the regs.

61.109(c) (Private Certification)
3 hours dual in helicopter ops
3 hrs dual XC
3 hrs dual test prep
10 hrs solo

61.65(d) (Instrument)
15 hrs dual
100 nm XC
3 hrs test prep

I don't know if any of the private requirements can be lumped with the instrument requirements or not.

Factor into this that these are regulatory minimums and may need to be increased for proficiency or time delays in training.
 
Last edited:

Rick1128

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Z Pilot,
Here is the way I read the regs.

61.109(c) (Private Certification)
3 hours dual in helicopter ops
3 hrs dual XC
3 hrs dual test prep
10 hrs solo

61.65(d) (Instrument)
10 hrs dual
100 nm XC
3 hrs test prep

I don't know if any of the private requirements can be lumped with the instrument requirements or not.

Factor into this that these are regulatory minimums and may need to be increased for proficiency or time delays in training.
I just went through the Instrument add-on and you will need 15 hours to meet the requirements of FAR 61.65 (D)(2)(i). For the Private add-on, plan on taking more time as you will have negative transfer issues to deal with.

The best thing is, you will not need to take written's for either rating, since they are add-on's. One of your biggest issues will be keeping the instrument rating current. As the regulations current make currency category dependent.
 
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Wow, just 19 hours!?! I might be able to afford it sooner than later. Thanks for the reply guys.
 
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