Dream of Flying for Emirates

Comet2

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Hi, I am a 16 year old with a dream of flying. In particular, i would love to fly for Emirates. I have seen pictures of Dubai, read about the company, and i feel like that company is amazing. Not to say i wouldn't be happy flying anywhere else, but the lifestyle of an Emirates pilot wins me over.

Right now i am enrolled in the college of southern nevada high school. It is a program where students can earn both their Associates degree and their high school diploma. I am getting my AA in applied science of aviation, and by the time i graduate i will hopefully have both my private pilots and instrument while in the program. I would have my commercial as well, but i won't be 18 when i graduate. So, after graduation, i am hoping to earn my commercial ASAP.

Once i recieve that, i would love to join Scenic. It is a local company where i could earn LOTS of multi time (they fly twin otters). After getting multi time, i would hopefully join a regional airline, where i would stay for some time.

Now, if i work very hard at a regional and gets lots of time quickly, is it possible for me to have minimums for Emirates by age 25/26? See, i really want to be there at the youngest age possible. I will have most of the required ratings by age 18, the only hard part (it seems) would be getting enough seniority in an airline to get a lot of time.

I know the path i have chosen might be different than most people's, and i know i have chosen a very difficult path as well. I am a straight "A" student in school, very driven, everything.

I know this path isn't perfect either, so what im asking for is advice. Any ideas you have would be GREATLY appreciated.

Thank you very much for you time, and any advice is welcome!!
 

Gillegan

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It's always good to have a goal but consider this; Emirates is the flavor of the moment. It is expanding quickly and aggressively and for pilots who have joined within the last 15 years, represents a good career opportunity in terms of command prospects on large, new equipment. By the time you qualify for employment, most of Emirates growth will be behind it and you could expect the type of career stagnation that you now see at the more long-established carriers.

In the meantime, watch the industry and try to think in terms of "who is the next Emirates, SWA, Cathay, BA, PanAm, Eastern, USAir, etc.." I include some of those failed carriers because at some time, they too were the flavor of the moment. It's hard to have a crystal ball in this industry but my advice would be to keep watching, learn how to analyse not only the industry but wholesale economic movements and set your goals accordingly. Your goal should not be to fly for Emirates but to fly for the "next Emirates". I know that is easier said than done and there is a whole lot of luck involved in the process but you can exercise some modicum of control over your career. In the meantime, study hard, take your training seriously (your ratings and time are not just boxes to tick but are the tools that you will use once you become a professional pilot) and enjoy the ride. It will definitely be a bumpy one.

Or - you can just close your eyes and throw your dart, you might have the same chance of success. Good Luck
 

CX880

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Good point. You're 16, not only so much will have changed in the industry by the time you have Emirates minimums but you yourself will be older and be more mature. Most have no idea where they will eventually end up and they certainly don't plan it from their teenage years.

Good thing you're so driven at a young age, you will definitely have a few years head start on the industry if you get your ratings by age 18. However, I strongly suggest you focus on life instead of flying. In my opinion the period of 18-21 year and even a few years later shouldn't be spent in airline cockpits but out there enjoying life doing stupid things. My years in college were a vast wasteland but I wouldn't trade it for anything, even sitting reserve to fly a regional prop/jet at age 18. Don't forget that the average age for major hiring is 30-35. Good luck
 

Thedude

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Don't forget that the average age for major hiring is 30-35. Good luck
That was the avg age in the late 90s. No longer applies today.
 

Papa Woody

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I know the path i have chosen might be different than most people's, and i know i have chosen a very difficult path as well. I am a straight "A" student in school, very driven, everything.
There was a time in America when the brightest, hard-working youngsters yearned for greatness. To be a neurosurgeon, a physicist, engineer, or educator.

Now, in our f^c&ed-up world, the best-and-brightest dream of being part of the working-class slaves for a few stone-aged toga-clad gazillionaires who plan only to slit our throats after all the oil has been paid for.

Very sad.
 

typhoonpilot

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There was a time in America when the brightest, hard-working youngsters yearned for greatness. To be a neurosurgeon, a physicist, engineer, or educator.

Now, in our f^c&ed-up world, the best-and-brightest dream of being part of the working-class slaves for a few stone-aged toga-clad gazillionaires who plan only to slit our throats after all the oil has been paid for.

Very sad.

What's even more sad is that as an airline pilot (which is his aspiring career) in the USA he would generally make far less working for the Harvard MBAs and other corrupt and inept airline management than working for the "toga-clad gazillionaires". My contemporaries in the USA make 1.5 to 2 times less per year than I do and are still on the bottom of their repsective seniority lists after a decade or more of service.

The choice of staying in the USA working for the Republican backed Wall Street bozos who screw labor at every turn in the road or going overseas and working as a mercenary pilot for hire for double the money is an easy one.



Typhoonpilot
 

Comet2

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There was a time in America when the brightest, hard-working youngsters yearned for greatness. To be a neurosurgeon, a physicist, engineer, or educator.

Now, in our f^c&ed-up world, the best-and-brightest dream of being part of the working-class slaves for a few stone-aged toga-clad gazillionaires who plan only to slit our throats after all the oil has been paid for.

Very sad.
Thanks for the input; however, I'm sure you'll understand if I don't apologize for making career choices that don't meet other's 'traditional' expectations, but my dream is to fly, it always has been. The adventure of seeing the world and experiencing everything it has to offer carries a lot more appeal than the professions u suggest, none of which interest me. I don't wish to waste time and money pursuing a career in something that doesn't inspire me (money is not all the motivator it makes itself out to be).

Beyond politics and stereotypes, I feel Emirates is a world-class international carrier that is very well-run.

To others, particularly Typhoon and Gillegan, thanks so much for your wisdom and support. Guys like you are tough to come by on these message boards.
 

Desert1

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There was a time in America when the brightest, hard-working youngsters yearned for greatness. To be a neurosurgeon, a physicist, engineer, or educator.

Now, in our f^c&ed-up world, the best-and-brightest dream of being part of the working-class slaves for a few stone-aged toga-clad gazillionaires who plan only to slit our throats after all the oil has been paid for.

Very sad.
Very Sad???! Have you taken a look at our youth and what our society is producing lately? I'm thankful (and amazed) we have kids out there still eager to do anything beyond the traditional practice of getting wasted, piercing themselves, riding skateboards, getting tatoos, and painting up the village.

What is truly sad is the cavalier way by which you diminish and criticize the efforts of a hard-working young man who is actively pursuing his dream. He comes here seeking the advice of experienced members of this industry, only to find cynicism and contempt, from the likes of you. Feel better now?

Comet, good on ya kid, keep up the good work and follow your dreams and ambitions. Kids like you are a rare find these days; you should be proud. Keep in mind that you can learn as much from the bad as you can from the good, so let this be a lesson to you: stay on target and never let anyone drag you down. In all likeliness there will be more that will try...

D1
 

Gillegan

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The choice of staying in the USA working for the Republican backed Wall Street bozos who screw labor at every turn in the road or going overseas and working as a mercenary pilot for hire for double the money is an easy one.
So it's Obama then I take it.;)
 

Father Jack

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the best-and-brightest dream of being part of the working-class slaves for a few stone-aged toga-clad gazillionaires who plan only to slit our throats after all the oil has been paid for.

Very sad.[/quote]

What is sad is that you actually have these beliefs about Emirates Airline. Unlike any US carrier, a company that is growing, provides great customer service, and gives their employees a raise and a bonus evey year. "Slaves?" Hardly. And management does not, as is the norm in The States, constantly poor-mouth while lining each-others pockets.

And if "The stews is the news," you'd love Emirates
 

Duck94

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Comet,

There is the other way of getting there which is the military. I didn't do it (as a pilot at least), but if you can get in, it may get you some jet time which looks real good on the resume.

If you stay in the reserve or get a reserve slot you can do both the airlines and fly a military plane/copter...

Just a thought. For someone so driven and with good grades it sounds like an option. And they would pay for your training so if you do it before you start on your commercial that would save you some money. Air Force Academy or Naval Academy might be an option too...
 

RemoveB4Flght

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Thanks for the input; however, I'm sure you'll understand if I don't apologize for making career choices that don't meet other's 'traditional' expectations, but my dream is to fly, it always has been. The adventure of seeing the world and experiencing everything it has to offer carries a lot more appeal than the professions u suggest, none of which interest me. I don't wish to waste time and money pursuing a career in something that doesn't inspire me (money is not all the motivator it makes itself out to be).

Beyond politics and stereotypes, I feel Emirates is a world-class international carrier that is very well-run.
The point that some are trying to make is that the more you cling to one set path in this industry, the more frustrated you will make yourself.

a couple years from now this Scenic is out of business.. or the regionals hit another hiring slump, or you get furloughed like many are right now and can't build the jet time. Maybe Emirates stops taking non type rated pilots, or those with no time on type. so maybe you decide to instruct for a while to build hours, and maybe you get a job flying boxes, or maybe one of your students runs a company and decides to put you through training to fly his corporate jet. and the next thing you know you are driving a Gulfstream V... would you consider your career to be a failure becuase you never drove an Emirates triple 7?

You have a long path ahead of you.. my advice is to enjoy each step of it. Ask the career flight instructors, or the freight dogs who are some of the best pilots out there, or the older regional airline captains who had a few thousand hours before they got a chance to right-seat a turboprop across Montana, and know now that even if they went to a legacy, they would never get a wide body command becuase they don't have enough years left in their career. Is that not flying? They are every bit the professional aviators that wide body captains are.

So much of this industry involves timing, luck, and contacts. You never know where life is going to take you. Never limit yourself, always look for your unique opportunities. It's not a bad thing to have goals, but the funny part about that career is that the jobs seem to pick you, not the other way around.
 

Jeff Helgeson

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Think outside the box and stay open-minded

If Emirates is really your goal, then here are a few ideas:

-Emirates is starting an ab initio program. Why not apply on line or write the corp. offices of your goals and send them a transcript. Offer to do an internship for 6 months.

-Also take a look at Etihad

-try and get a pass out to Dubai or an invitation by the airline. Consider picking up some foreign language skills.

-and as others have said, don't just look to one airline for your career.

-If you have never lived or worked abroad before, you need to try that as a first step.

Jeff


Hi, I am a 16 year old with a dream of flying. In particular, i would love to fly for Emirates. I have seen pictures of Dubai, read about the company, and i feel like that company is amazing. Not to say i wouldn't be happy flying anywhere else, but the lifestyle of an Emirates pilot wins me over.

Right now i am enrolled in the college of southern nevada high school. It is a program where students can earn both their Associates degree and their high school diploma. I am getting my AA in applied science of aviation, and by the time i graduate i will hopefully have both my private pilots and instrument while in the program. I would have my commercial as well, but i won't be 18 when i graduate. So, after graduation, i am hoping to earn my commercial ASAP.

Once i recieve that, i would love to join Scenic. It is a local company where i could earn LOTS of multi time (they fly twin otters). After getting multi time, i would hopefully join a regional airline, where i would stay for some time.

Now, if i work very hard at a regional and gets lots of time quickly, is it possible for me to have minimums for Emirates by age 25/26? See, i really want to be there at the youngest age possible. I will have most of the required ratings by age 18, the only hard part (it seems) would be getting enough seniority in an airline to get a lot of time.

I know the path i have chosen might be different than most people's, and i know i have chosen a very difficult path as well. I am a straight "A" student in school, very driven, everything.

I know this path isn't perfect either, so what im asking for is advice. Any ideas you have would be GREATLY appreciated.

Thank you very much for you time, and any advice is welcome!!
 

Gillegan

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-Emirates is starting an ab initio program. Why not apply on line or write the corp. offices of your goals and send them a transcript. Offer to do an internship for 6 months.


A slight correction; Emirates has an ab initio program for UAE Nationals but has no plans at this time to open the program up for other nationalities. A year ago when the job market for pilots was very tight, there was some discussion of the idea but given the glut of pilots on the market right now, there are no plans. Of course that doesn't mean that it won't happen in the future.
 
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