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DAL applies to DOT for Haneda service.

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ACL65PILOT

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ATLANTA, Feb. 16 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Delta Air Lines (NYSE:DAL - News) today filed an application with the U.S. Department of Transportation to offer customers nonstop service between Tokyo's Haneda Airport and Seattle, Detroit, Los Angeles and Honolulu. Delta is seeking to compete at Tokyo's centrally located Haneda airport, which is slated to be re-opened to U.S. carriers for the first time since 1978 under a proposed new aviation treaty with Japan.
(Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20090202/DELTALOGO )
The importance of Delta's application is underscored by the fact that Delta's SkyTeam alliance is the only global network without the ability to compete at Haneda. The two other major alliances serving Tokyo-Haneda Star and Oneworld have Japanese partners that dominate service at the airport, with large hubs and extensive networks across Asia. Awarding Delta new slots to Haneda would add a third major airline alliance flying between the airport and the U.S., increasing competition and benefits to consumers.
"Enabling Delta to enter Haneda is critical to advancing airline competition in Tokyo, particularly considering the strong presence that the Star and oneworld alliance carriers already enjoy at this important and tightly controlled airport," said Glen Hauenstein, Delta's executive vice president - Network and Revenue Management. "No U.S. airline has invested more in Tokyo, and more customers and communities stand to gain from new Delta service at Haneda than can be served by competing applications."
Delta's application proposes new nonstop service, beginning Oct. 31, 2010, between Haneda and four U.S. cities:


  • Seattle This city already Delta and partner Alaska Airlines' primary West Coast gateway to Asia would serve as a convenient connecting point to central Tokyo for customers in 55 U.S. cities, as well as providing nonstop service for Seattle's large local market. Flights would be operated on 298-seat Airbus A330-300 aircraft.




  • Detroit Service between Detroit and Haneda is a natural addition to Delta's Eastern U.S. gateway to Asia. Delta's hub at Detroit, featuring a state-of-the-art 120-gate terminal designed for international connections, will provide one-stop service to Haneda for 106 U.S. cities. Service would be operated on 403-seat Boeing 747-400 aircraft.




  • Los Angeles With flights between Haneda and Los Angeles, Delta would be serving the largest U.S.-Tokyo market, as well as providing one-stop service for customers in 18 U.S. cities. Flights would be operated on Boeing 747-400 aircraft.




  • Honolulu Service between Haneda and Honolulu would provide new options for customers traveling the already popular and competitive leisure route between Tokyo and Hawaii's largest city. Delta would operate service with Boeing 747-400 aircraft.


"Delta's proposed new service stands to advance the commercial and tourism interests of both the U.S. and Japan by creating jobs and boosting local economies in communities on both sides of the Pacific, especially in Seattle, Detroit, Los Angeles, Honolulu and Tokyo," said Andrea Fischer Newman, senior vice president Government Affairs. "Delta needs to be able to meet the competitive challenge of new services that soon will be launched by Japanese airlines from Haneda, and our strong track record of trans-Pacific service from communities across the United States enables us to do that most effectively."
She noted that Haneda's popularity among business travelers could attract new businesses to cities with nonstop service.
"We are looking forward to working with elected and community leaders, our customers and Delta employees to make the case to the Department of Transportation that our new Japan service will have widespread benefits for consumers, residents and businesses alike," Newman said.
Delta's new service at Haneda would complement the airline's existing service at Tokyo's Narita airport. Delta currently offers flights between Narita and 11 U.S. cities.
Delta's complete proposed schedule for summer and winter service at Haneda is available online at http://news.delta.com/index.php?s=18&item=123.
Delta Air Lines, the world's No. 1 airline, serves more than 160 million passengers each year. With its unsurpassed global network, Delta and the Delta Connection carriers offer service to 367 destinations in 66 countries on six continents. Delta employs more than 70,000 employees worldwide and operates a mainline fleet of nearly 800 aircraft. A founding member of the SkyTeam global alliance, Delta participates in the industry's leading trans-Atlantic joint venture with Air France KLM. Including its worldwide alliance partners, Delta offers customers more than 16,000 daily flights, with hubs in Amsterdam, Atlanta, Cincinnati, Detroit, Memphis, Minneapolis-St. Paul, New York-JFK, Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Salt Lake City and Tokyo-Narita. The airline's service includes the SkyMiles frequent flier program, the world's largest airline loyalty program; the award-winning BusinessElite service; and more than 50 Delta Sky Clubs in airports worldwide. Customers can check in for flights, print boarding passes, check bags and review flight status at delta.com.
 
American also applied for Haneda slots, but to JFK and LAX. And, the times are interesting for the departures from Haneda.



American Airlines Applies to Fly From New York and Los Angeles to Tokyo (Haneda), the Busiest Airport in Asia
New Flights Would Complement American's Service to Tokyo (Narita)

Tuesday February 16, 2010, 605pm




FORT WORTH, Texas, Feb. 16 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- American Airlines, a founding member of the oneworld® Alliance, today filed an application with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) to acquire two daily slot pairs to operate year-round scheduled service to Tokyo International Airport at Haneda (HND), starting Oct. 1, 2010. American proposes to fly to Haneda from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) and Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), the two largest markets between the U.S. mainland and Tokyo.
"We have long wanted to fly from New York and Los Angeles to Haneda, the closest airport to downtown Tokyo," said Will Ris, American's Senior Vice President – Government Affairs. "New York and Tokyo are two of the world's principal financial centers, and Los Angeles, the nation's second largest city, has substantial ties to Japan. The new service will strengthen our relationship with our oneworld partner, Japan Airlines (JAL), which has extensive operations at Haneda.
"American applauds DOT and the U.S. Department of State for successfully negotiating an Open Skies accord with Japan last December that clears the way for U.S. airlines to serve Haneda once the new agreement is signed," said Ris. "There has been no scheduled service between the U.S. and Haneda since Narita opened in 1978.
"With almost 70 million annual passengers, Haneda is the fourth busiest airport in the world," Ris added. "It is in the public's best interest that New York and Los Angeles are first in line for this important new service opportunity."
American proposes to operate these new flights featuring 247-seat Boeing 777 aircraft, which hold 16 passengers in First Class, 37 in Business Class, and 194 in Economy Class. Here are the proposed schedules:

From JFK to Haneda:
From Haneda to JFK:
Depart at 7:20 p.m.
Arrive at 10:20 p.m. (next day)

Depart 700am (Haneda)
Arrive at 6:50 a.m. (same day)




The early evening departure from New York, and the early morning arrival in New York, will allow convenient round-trip connections to a number of beyond cities, including Boston, Miami, Orlando, Raleigh/Durham, St. Louis and Washington (Reagan).

From LAX to Haneda:
From Haneda to LAX:
Depart at 6:45 p.m.
Arrive at 1005 p.m. (next day)

Depart 1205am
Arrive at 6:10 p.m. (previous day)




The early evening departure from Los Angeles, and the early evening arrival at Los Angeles, will likewise allow convenient on-line roundtrip connections to a number of beyond cities, including American's hubs at Chicago, Dallas/Ft. Worth, and Miami, as well as Fresno, Las Vegas, New York (JFK), Portland, San Diego, San Francisco, San Juan, Santa Barbara, Seattle, and Washington (Dulles).
American currently operates nonstop service to Tokyo's Narita airport using Boeing 777 aircraft from Chicago (daily), Dallas/Fort Worth (twice daily), Los Angeles (daily), and New York JFK (daily). Under a codeshare arrangement between JAL and American, JAL displays its JL code on each of American's U.S.-Tokyo flights and American displays the AA code on daily flights operated by JAL between Narita and Chicago, Los Angeles, New York (JFK), and San Francisco.
On Feb. 12, American and JAL filed a joint application with DOT for antitrust immunity for an alliance agreement and a joint business agreement for services between North America and Asia. Subject to government approvals, those agreements will allow greater cooperation between American and JAL, enhanced competition and improved air travel across trans-Pacific routes.
American's and JAL's oneworld partner, British Airways, previously announced its intention to create a joint business agreement with JAL so that, from April 2011 and subject to regulatory approval, the two carriers can enjoy greater revenue sharing opportunities that will offer real long-term value for Japan Airlines. As part of a joint business venture, British Airways has offered to support and facilitate a new service between London Heathrow and Haneda.







And CAL just announced EWR to Haneda on a 777, and Guam to Haneda on a 764.


Bye Bye--General Lee
 
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So did CAL

Continental Airlines and Continental Micronesia Apply to Fly Nonstop From New York/Newark and Guam to Tokyo's Haneda Airport


WASHINGTON, Feb. 16 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Continental Airlines (NYSE:CAL - News) and its wholly-owned subsidiary Continental Micronesia today submitted a joint application to the Department of Transportation to provide nonstop service from the carriers' hubs in New York/Newark and Guam to Tokyo's Haneda airport.

Continental and Continental Micronesia seek the route awards as part of a historic open skies agreement between the U.S. and Japan, which is anticipated to come into force later this year. The open skies agreement would provide the U.S. airline industry access to Haneda, with its close proximity to Tokyo's central business district, for the first time in over 30 years.

"Continental again congratulates Secretary of State Clinton and Secretary of Transportation LaHood on securing rights for additional competitive U.S. airline service to Japan," said Jeff Smisek, Continental's chairman, president and chief executive officer. "We thank both the U.S. and Japan negotiating teams for achieving this landmark agreement, which will benefit air travel and consumers for years to come."

Both the New York and Guam hubs, two major gateways for passenger traffic to Tokyo, also provide convenient connecting opportunities for travel between Tokyo Haneda and numerous additional points.

The proposed nonstop service to Haneda would begin in late 2010, pending approval, and would use Boeing 777 aircraft from Continental's New York hub at Newark Liberty International Airport, and Boeing 767-400 aircraft from Continental Micronesia's hub at A. B. Won Pat International Airport in Guam.
 
Continental Airlines and Continental Micronesia Apply to Fly Nonstop From New York/Newark and Guam to Tokyo's Haneda Airport


WASHINGTON, Feb. 16 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Continental Airlines (NYSE:CAL - News) and its wholly-owned subsidiary Continental Micronesia today submitted a joint application to the Department of Transportation to provide nonstop service from the carriers' hubs in New York/Newark and Guam to Tokyo's Haneda airport.

Continental and Continental Micronesia seek the route awards as part of a historic open skies agreement between the U.S. and Japan, which is anticipated to come into force later this year. The open skies agreement would provide the U.S. airline industry access to Haneda, with its close proximity to Tokyo's central business district, for the first time in over 30 years.

"Continental again congratulates Secretary of State Clinton and Secretary of Transportation LaHood on securing rights for additional competitive U.S. airline service to Japan," said Jeff Smisek, Continental's chairman, president and chief executive officer. "We thank both the U.S. and Japan negotiating teams for achieving this landmark agreement, which will benefit air travel and consumers for years to come."

Both the New York and Guam hubs, two major gateways for passenger traffic to Tokyo, also provide convenient connecting opportunities for travel between Tokyo Haneda and numerous additional points.

The proposed nonstop service to Haneda would begin in late 2010, pending approval, and would use Boeing 777 aircraft from Continental's New York hub at Newark Liberty International Airport, and Boeing 767-400 aircraft from Continental Micronesia's hub at A. B. Won Pat International Airport in Guam.


How many crews to staff this at CAL ?
 
One per alliance is my guess.

Well you could say that ANA and JAL have that covered for Star and Oneworld. Looks like the skyteam needs some slots to compete fairly with those alliances...... just sayin....
 

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