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continental 0 200 question

J3guy

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I'm taking a run out 0 200 with key ignition out of my 150 and the engine that i'm replacing it with is an 0 200 with the pull start. My mechanic at the moment didnt' know what that would involve parts and cost wise. I would like to keep it with a key ignition. Any help is greatly appreciated. thankyou
 

avbug

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Keep the key ignition. The engine installation is irrelevant. You're talking about a starter installation, not the engine installation. The difference is how you actually move the starter solenoid...do you do it mechanically, or with an electrical switch? If you prefer the electrical switch, then retain it. Not a big deal.
 

J3guy

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thanks avbug, i just wanted to make sure i had everything i need when my mech. gets ready to swap engines. Anyone else want to chim in with advice?
 

avbug

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Keep your current starter, or keep the new starter if the other engine is so-equipped. The engine interface will be the same. The only difference will be the control for the starter, be it mechanical actuation or electrical switch for solenoid.
 

nickgutnick

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thanks avbug, i just wanted to make sure i had everything i need when my mech. gets ready to swap engines. Anyone else want to chim in with advice?
Sounds like good advice to me, besides I don't think anyone is willing to question avbug......out of fear of upsetting the great one
 

belchfire

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J-3 guy-there is an important thing to note here in this exchange of starters-and there are TCM service bullitens that should be consulted.

My memory of all that is involved has been faded by the 20+years but as I recall...

When the switchover from manual starters to solenoid took place there was a problem. The old t handle starters you manually engaged the starter to the engine as well as closing the switch. With the key type starter there is a sprag clutch of some sort to connect the starter to the accessory drives which needed spray lubrication. The TCM SB addresses some sort of tweek to the accessory case that allows oil to be sprayed onto the starter's sprag clutch assembly.

The only reason that I know about it is the airport I learned to fly at (and wrenched at a little) had three C-150's-one with the pull start and two with the key start. Somehow in moving a spare engine, various overhauls and such the accessory case that had been on the T-handle start airplane got onto one of the key start airplanes and suddenly there was a rash of sprag clutch failures.

Make darn sure that your accessory case has the mod unless you like buying starters!
 
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J3guy

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thanks belchfire. you're right. After looking into it i decided it isnt' worth it. There a kit i can buy to make it work but the time that it would take, it would be expensive. Not to mention the 900 smoh engine i was interested in has the old cylinders, i just found out, so the timing is 24 btc, no good. thanks for the input.
 

erj-145mech

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thanks belchfire. you're right. After looking into it i decided it isnt' worth it. There a kit i can buy to make it work but the time that it would take, it would be expensive. Not to mention the 900 smoh engine i was interested in has the old cylinders, i just found out, so the timing is 24 btc, no good. thanks for the input.

Changing the timing is an easy chore, XX out the 24 and stamp the 22, on the data plate, and tetime the mags to comply. Make the log book entry and you're off to the races.
 

J3guy

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Changing the timing is an easy chore, XX out the 24 and stamp the 22, on the data plate, and tetime the mags to comply. Make the log book entry and you're off to the races.
all true, Continental had problems with cracking cylinders, so the timing was turned back on the old style cylinder = loss of power output. I would like the new cylinder, so it just wasnt' worth it.
 

erj-145mech

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all true, Continental had problems with cracking cylinders, so the timing was turned back on the old style cylinder = loss of power output. I would like the new cylinder, so it just wasnt' worth it.
If there was a reduction, you can't measure it. My 150 still made book performance after the re-time. The airplane/engine only had 700 hours total time on it when I bought it. This isn't a high performance powerplant to start with, and I'm not sure that the cracking was from operators using mogas or cylinders that had numerous overhauls on them. No one tracks the times and cycles on the individual cylinders, just the engine assembly.
 
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